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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2014

Abdul-Rahman, Chen Wang, Azli Mohd Rahim, Siaw Chuing Loo and Nadzmi Miswan

Numerous researchers proved Vertical Greenery System VGS beneficial to buildings and surroundings. However, it is still not widely applied in the tropics like Malaysia…

Abstract

Numerous researchers proved Vertical Greenery System VGS beneficial to buildings and surroundings. However, it is still not widely applied in the tropics like Malaysia. This paper aims to determine the perceptions of VGS among the end users before it can be improved. A survey was conducted among 40 respondents, the end users of VGS in selected buildings within Klang Valley area. The collected data was analysed using statistical tests. From the findings, the primary benefits of VGS perceived by end users are enhancing visual quality, bringing nature harmony, reducing stress and reducing the urban heat island effects. The perceptions contradict with the results of ANOVA test between reducing the urban heat island effects and other VGS benefits that proves the need and effort to work on VGS in Malaysia.

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Open House International, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Michael Y.L. Chew and Sheila Conejos

The use of green wall technology in green buildings is a growing trend; however, more research is required about their maintainability, taking into account that…

Abstract

Purpose

The use of green wall technology in green buildings is a growing trend; however, more research is required about their maintainability, taking into account that maintainability at the design stage is a valuable strategy in achieving building efficiency and sustainability. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to determine the issues in operating and maintaining green walls, particularly in tropical areas like Singapore, leading to the development of a green maintainability framework.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses a qualitative method that combines a thorough and systematic literature review, multiple case studies, field observation surveys and selected instrumental case studies with building plan appraisal and interviews to investigate the potential issues associated with the maintainability of green walls in tropical areas like Singapore.

Findings

The findings show that technical and environmental issues/defects are prevalent in the operation and maintainability of green wall technologies applied in green buildings located in tropical regions. Proper considerations of these findings will encourage green building designers and facilities managers to collaborate in the effective implementation of operations and maintenance of green building technologies.

Originality/value

This research gives new and significant information while identifying a clear knowledge gap. The paper recommends the formulation of a green maintainability framework with a set of design criteria that will serve as a benchmark in the future design of green walls. The green maintainability framework would be a valuable addition to green facilities management in ensuring the long-term maintainability and sustainability of existing and new green walls in tropical areas specifically in Singapore.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 34 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2019

Sheila Conejos, Michael Yit Lin Chew and Fikril Hakim Bin Azril

Vertical greenery systems (VGS) have been a widely accepted design strategy that contributes to creating sustainable built environments. However, green building…

Abstract

Purpose

Vertical greenery systems (VGS) have been a widely accepted design strategy that contributes to creating sustainable built environments. However, green building technologies (e.g. VGS) have grown in complexity which poses maintainability challenges. Designing with maintainability in mind is crucial in delivering efficient and sustainable buildings. This paper aims to assist designers and allied professionals in terms of integrating maintainability and sustainable design in developing high-rise VGS directly from its design inception.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is grounded on the “Green Maintainability” concept which link maintainability, sustainability and facility management right at the outset. The Green Maintainability factors are translated into critical design criteria which are used to analyze the selected instrumental case studies to evaluate the high-rise VGS performance and maintainability potential. A qualitative approach via the triangulation of data collected from relevant literatures, field surveys and walkthrough interviews is undertaken.

Findings

Findings have shown that the major VGS defects which are mostly occurring in the case studies are issues concerning fallen leaves and dirt accumulation; safety issues during cleaning and repairs; insufficient maintenance access; algae/ mould growth; withering plants; water stagnation/ ponding; poor/faulty irrigation and water dripping and unavailability of natural elements. Best practices and lessons learned revealed few design oversight and technical issues concerning high-rise VGS façade implementation. While maintenance cost, biodiversity and lack of coordination among involved professionals are the additional issues which emerged during the stakeholders’ walkthrough interviews.

Originality/value

Current researches conducted on the maintainability of green building technologies (e.g. high-rise VGS) are still few. This research study is the first comprehensive assessment to determine the green maintainability potential and performance of high-rise VGS in tropical conditions.

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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2021

Ga Yoon Choi, Hwan Sung Kim, Hyungkyoo Kim and Jae Seung Lee

In cities with high density, heat is often trapped between buildings which increases the frequency and intensity of heat events. Researchers have focused on developing…

Abstract

Purpose

In cities with high density, heat is often trapped between buildings which increases the frequency and intensity of heat events. Researchers have focused on developing strategies to mitigate the negative impacts of heat in cities. Adopting green infrastructure and cooling pavements are some of the many ways to promote thermal comfort against heat. The purpose of this study is to improve microclimate conditions and thermal comfort levels in high-density living conditions in Seoul, South Korea.

Design/methodology/approach

This study compares six design alternatives of an apartment complex with different paving and planting systems. It also examines the thermal outcome of the alternatives under normal and extreme heat conditions to suggest strategies to secure acceptable thermal comfort levels for the inhabitants. Each alternative is analyzed using ENVI-met, a software program that simulates microclimate conditions and thermal comfort features based on relationships among buildings, vegetation and pavements.

Findings

The results indicate that grass paving was more effective than stone paving in lowering air temperature and improving thermal comfort at the near-surface level. Coniferous trees were found to be more effective than broadleaf trees in reducing temperature. Thermal comfort levels were most improved when coniferous trees were planted in paired settings.

Practical implications

Landscape elements show promise for the improvement of thermal conditions because it is much easier to redesign landscape elements, such as paving or planting, than to change fixed urban elements like buildings and roads. The results identified the potential of landscape design for improving microclimate and thermal comfort in urban residential complexes.

Originality/value

The results contribute to the literature by examining the effect of tree species and layout on thermal comfort levels, which has been rarely investigated in previous studies.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2017

Shazmin Shareena Ab. Azis, Ibrahim Sipan, Maimunah Sapri, Rohaya Abdul Jalil and Izran Sarrazin Mohammad

The purpose of this paper is to identify green envelope building components of residential buildings applicable under hot and humid climates and to analyze the effect of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify green envelope building components of residential buildings applicable under hot and humid climates and to analyze the effect of these components on building value.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors place an emphasis on green envelope components that influence building value and which are derived based on their integration into a building envelope structure that is applicable under hot and humid climates. This is performed through identification of green benefits of each green envelope component based on literature reviews and in relation to green criteria listed by the Malaysia Green Building Index (GBI). Consequently, a quantitative analysis has been conducted to determine the effect of these green envelope components on building value by means of a questionnaire distribution among 550 property valuation practitioners in Malaysia. However, in order to certify respondents’ credibility, the authors analyzed questionnaires answered by property valuation practitioners with experience in green valuation.

Findings

The findings show that there are ten green envelope components currently certified under GBI Malaysia and applicable for hot and humid climates. There are three green envelope components that can increase property values, specifically: solar photovoltaic, green living wall and green roof. However, eight of the green envelope components have no effect on building value.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the relative immaturity of the green building market in Malaysia, the authors were unable to analyze the actual percentage of increment on building value as conveyed by each green envelope component.

Originality/value

This paper aims to provide understanding of the effect of individual green envelope components on building value rather than merely the value of green buildings in general. It proves that green building envelope components do in fact contribute to an increase in green building values. As the green building market in Malaysia is still in its infancy, this study is significant in that it prepares the Malaysian green building market to attain a new level by providing valuation practitioners with awareness of green building values and new knowledge concerning the effect of individual green components on building values. Hence, it is anticipated that this study can assist property valuation practitioners in conducting valuations of green buildings in the future.

Details

Property Management, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 16 June 2021

Faith Owoha, Eric Kwame Simpeh, Julius Ayodeji Fapohunda, Divine Kwaku Ahadzie and Henry Mensah

This study aims to explore the concept of green building by determining a suitable system for categorising green building features (GBFs) that are considered significant…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the concept of green building by determining a suitable system for categorising green building features (GBFs) that are considered significant in enhancing the value of a building in a developing economy with particular reference to South Africa. The motivation for categorising the features is based on the perception that the upsurge in adopting green building and sustainability has ushered in a new and formidable set of challenges to practising professionals in terms of recognising the most significant value-adding GBFs.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative approach was adopted, involving randomly selected construction professionals within the Western Cape Province of South Africa. The data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistical analysis tools.

Findings

Based on the mean ranking analysis, the top three most important features, amongst others, were kitchen and water-closet (WC) water efficient fittings, megawatt photovoltaic solar plant and water metering for monitoring and leak detection. Additionally, an exploratory factor analysis revealed that the underlying grouped features were “recycled materials and high-performance building energy design”, “water-saving and solar technologies”, “biometric system and acoustical feature”, “sensor control and natural daylight design”, “daylight harnessing feature”, “high-performance hydrologic strategy and noise control feature” and “special utility feature and water efficiency technologies”.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted and limited only to the Western Cape Province of South Africa. However, the findings have practical significance to the generality of green building projects and may serve as a useful guide for other developing countries.

Originality/value

This study broadens the viewpoint of construction professionals to recognise and prioritise the most important GBFs in South Africa that increase the value of a building. To create a system for assessing the sustainability of a building, the seven components and the features associated with them may be useful.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2007

Zbigniew Bromberek

The argument presented in this paper is based on distinctive and exploitable differences which merit putting eco-tourists, eco-resorts and the coastal tropics into…

Abstract

The argument presented in this paper is based on distinctive and exploitable differences which merit putting eco-tourists, eco-resorts and the coastal tropics into categories of their own. Such differences should inform planning and design process when working in this environment, which is both very sensitive and valuable. The paper aims to describe the main characteristics of the coastal tropics as a climate targeted by eco-tourism. Differences between eco-tourists and residents are presented through definition of comfort. Climatic and other factors influencing comfort limits are at the core of discussion, in which passive design is seen as the most appropriate response to challenges of the tropical coast setting. The design opportunities for the desirable climate modifications in eco-friendly resorts together with some passive design features are briefly presented. These architectural design solutions are set against theoretical principles specific to tropical coastal regions. The focus is on human responses to environmental factors, and on their implications. The paper concludes with a few recommendations aimed to deliver indoor conditions consistent with climatic preferences of itinerant environmentally conscious users of buildings in the coastal tropics. Such an approach is expected to minimize impacts the facility will make on the environment.

Details

Open House International, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2014

Adi Ainurzaman Jamaludin, Nila Keumala, Ati Rosemary Mohd Ariffin and Hazreena Hussein

Three residential colleges located in a university campus at the capital city of Kuala Lumpur and built in different decades were selected for landscape studies with…

Abstract

Three residential colleges located in a university campus at the capital city of Kuala Lumpur and built in different decades were selected for landscape studies with respect to species and position of the trees, as well as the effects of the current landscapes as a shelter in reducing solar radiation on buildings, as a pre-assessment for the Low Carbon Cities Framework (LCCF) and assessment system. These landscape designs were carefully studied through on-site observation. The name and location of the matured plants were redrawn and visualised with standard normal photographs. The studies revealed that the old residential college landscape is dominated by tropical forest trees which are able to provide a significant shade to the buildings and offered a potential to achieve sustainable development due to a higher rate of carbon sequestration. While, palm and hybrid fruit plants were most extensively cultivated in the landscape of new residential colleges due to low maintenance and being fast growing.

Details

Open House International, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Manfred Köhler, Marco Schmidt, Friedrich Wilhelm Grimme, Michael Laar, Vera Lúcia de Assunção Paiva and Sergio Tavares

Green roofs are still often seen as a pure aesthetical element in architecture, as a spleen of some “greenies”. In fact green roofs already contribute, to some extent, to…

Abstract

Green roofs are still often seen as a pure aesthetical element in architecture, as a spleen of some “greenies”. In fact green roofs already contribute, to some extent, to a better microclimate through evaporation, filtering of dust from the air and a decrease in temperatures at the rooftop. In cities like Berlin and Munich many green roofs have already been realised. Coupled with this microclimate improvement, is the thermal comfort improvement under such roofs by more mass, dry or wet substrate, and shading through the plants. Besides improving the microclimate and the indoor climate, the retention of rainwater is another important advantage. That means an important reduction of the rainwater input in the sewage system during rainfalls, cutting the peak load, avoiding an overload of the system, which might cause flooding and serious health problems. The risk of flooding in cities, which is increasing in many cities due to a ground sealed by buildings, asphalt and concrete, can be diminished. One recent example of the use of green roofs with this purpose is the Potsdamer Platz in the centre of Berlin, where 100 percent of the rainwater has to be evaporated or used for toilet flushing on the building site. Scientific knowledge on green roofs is still limited to temperate climates, due to a development which took place in central Europe. Since 2000 a scientific project in Rio de Janeiro is checking local parameters, like possible vegetation, which can be used and substrate composition. Parallel to this, four prototype roofs, three greened and one blank, are used to measure the retention rate of the rain water and the temperature on the underside of the roofs in order to analyse the possible improvement of the thermal comfort in buildings. This paper will describe the scientific results of Germany and discuss the practicability on a larger scale under tropical conditions.

Details

Environmental Management and Health, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-6163

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Article
Publication date: 26 September 2019

Aravazhi Selvaraj, S. Nedumaran, Disha Bose, Jyosthnaa Padmanabhan, Yesudas Pangiraj and Kiran Sharma

The purpose of this paper is to estimate the market demand and compare the average market margins for six broad categories of fresh produce in different retail formats…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to estimate the market demand and compare the average market margins for six broad categories of fresh produce in different retail formats across five select cities of the country. It also tries to qualitatively understand the supply chain management practices of these retailers across cities.

Design/methodology/approach

Registered retail outlets were selected randomly from online sources. Market potential was estimated as the average sales of each category of fresh produce. Personal interviews were conducted with the market players in order to collect qualitative data about their supply chain management practices.

Findings

Potatoes, onions and tomatoes are the largest consumed category of fresh produce across cities. Consumers in Tier 1 and Tier 2 cities exhibit different buying behavior and preferences. Large retailers and small retailers coexist in the cities. Marketing margins of retail formats are not uniform across cities.

Research limitations/implications

The study did not capture the reasons for the differences observed in consumer preferences and buying behavior across cities. The study has taken into consideration only registered neighborhood stores in the study locations.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, the paper is first of its kind which has attempted to estimate the categorywise market potential of fresh produce across study cities.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

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