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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Yasemin Afacan

The aging population and their expectations have become a growing concern in Turkey as in other countries. This study aims to investigate interactions/relationships…

Abstract

The aging population and their expectations have become a growing concern in Turkey as in other countries. This study aims to investigate interactions/relationships between the needs, demands and expectations of Turkish elderly and inclusive urban design principles. It tries to answer the research question: how the inclusive urban life could improve elderly life and contribute to achieve an active aging process. An exploratory study was conducted with a total of 100 randomly selected elderly between the ages 65-95 (45 female and 55 male) from the City Centre of Ankara. A survey instrument based on the ‘streets for life’ concept (Burton & Mitchell 2006) was developed to gather data. The participants were asked to identify how important inclusive urban design features were in understanding, using and navigating within an urban environment. The findings of the study suggest that an inclusive open environment allows elderly people to feel safer, and thus encourage more regular use of urban space. Overall the results highlight two important insights, first that accessibility is inevitable for increasing the chance of the aging population to participate in the mainstream of community life and second, plain and simple signage is necessary to achieve more liveable urban environments. The study concludes the most important physical requirements and social requirements for elderly people.

Details

Open House International, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2017

Hourakhsh Ahmad Nia, Resmiye Alpar Atun and Rokhsaneh Rahbarianyazd

This study assesses changing aesthetic values and their characteristics in urban environments based on human perception. With this in mind, a model for assessing the…

Abstract

This study assesses changing aesthetic values and their characteristics in urban environments based on human perception. With this in mind, a model for assessing the aesthetic values of the urban environment based on the three steps of human cognition has been developed to elaborate the user's perception in different urban environments.

The results of the survey confirm that by changing urban morphology the aesthetic perception of the environment also changes. The finding of this research opens up a new window for urban planners to assess the aesthetic effects of the elements of urban spatial configuration for future urban development.

Details

Open House International, vol. 42 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 June 2020

Ashraf M. Salama and Yonca Hurol

The purpose of this paper is to construct a series of narratives by assessing a selection of the key literature generated by Open House International (OHI) over a period…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to construct a series of narratives by assessing a selection of the key literature generated by Open House International (OHI) over a period of 15 years. The paper also presents a brief review of the latest developments of the journal while introducing concise observations on the articles published in this edition – Volume 45, Issues 1 and 2.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a classification procedure of selected special issues published by OHI since 2006, 10 issues were identified based on the currency of the issues they generated. Following the review of the editorials, the key content of more than 100 articles within these special issues, the content of this edition and relevant seminal literature, the analysis engages, through critical reflection, with various themes that echo the polyphonic nature of built environment research.

Findings

The analysis conveys the plurality and diversity in built environment research where generic types of narratives are established to include three categories, namely, leitmotif, contextual/conceptual and open-ended narratives. Each of which includes sub-narrative classifications. The leitmotif narrative includes design studio pedagogy, sustainable environments for tourism, responsive learning environments, affordable housing environments, diversity in urban environments and urbanism in globalised environments. The contextual/conceptual narrative encompasses architecture and urbanism in the global south and the tripartite urban performance and transformation. The open-ended narrative embraces thematic reflections on the contributions of this edition of OHI.

Originality/value

Constructing polyphonic narratives in built environment research based on contemporary knowledge is original in the sense of capturing the crux of the themes within these narratives and articulating this in a pithy form. The elocution of the narratives stimulates a sustained quest for re-thinking concepts, notions and issues of concerns while invigorating research prospects and setting the future direction of OHI.

Details

Open House International, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 October 2018

David Deakins and Jo Bensemann

The purpose of this paper is to present qualitative evidence on strategies undertaken by 34 innovative small firms.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present qualitative evidence on strategies undertaken by 34 innovative small firms.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample of innovative firms is solely recruited from the agri-business sector that are located in contrasting environments varying from rural areas with low urban influence to areas with high urban influence and “main” urban or city areas. The authors discuss strategies in the light of a theoretical approach that incorporates a resource-based view, dynamic capabilities (DCs) and social network theory.

Findings

Although there is diversity in strategies across the 34 innovative small firms, irrespective of their “rural” or “urbanenvironment, qualitative evidence sheds light on differences in the way that strategies are pursued.

Research limitations/implications

The study indicates that small firms in rural environments can be just as innovative as their counterparts in urban environments; however, the authors demonstrate that they adopt different strategies, which have been shaped by their environment, to achieve innovation. The authors use the qualitative evidence to develop the theory of DCs and classify the sample into four clusters which marries the environmental context and innovative DCs.

Originality/value

The paper makes a contribution to a research gap on the way that the environment can shape management strategies in innovative small firms. It contributes to a limited literature in this area.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 57 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

William J Rose, Diane A Mollenkopf, Chad W. Autry and John E. Bell

As global populations become increasingly urbanized and urban areas grow in density and complexity, many firms seeking to operate in these areas face significant new…

1784

Abstract

Purpose

As global populations become increasingly urbanized and urban areas grow in density and complexity, many firms seeking to operate in these areas face significant new challenges. The purpose of this paper is to identify the approaches utilized by urban logistics service providers to overcome the issues resulting from urban density and complexity. The paper also identifies potential directions for future research based on the research findings.

Design/methodology/approach

The study followed a grounded theory approach (Corbin and Strauss, 2008) to uncover the approaches utilized by logistics service providers to adapt to urban environments.

Findings

The urban environment exerts certain coercive and mimetic pressures on logistics service providers. To overcome these pressures, urban logistics service providers seek to manage space, resources, and legitimacy in the urban environment.

Research limitations/implications

This research followed an inductive approach, and therefore, further empirical research is required to ensure statistical generalizability. Additionally, all research participants are currently employed in the USA, and so further research at the international level should be conducted.

Practical implications

The framework presented will enable firms seeking to enter the urban market to more quickly adapt to the specific pressures of the urban ecology.

Originality/value

While literature from several academic disciplines outline problems and solutions specific to urban areas, little qualitative, inductive research has been conducted in the field of urban logistics. The current research serves as a starting point for further urban logistics research.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 June 2020

Abrar Faisal, Julia N. Albrecht and Willem J.L. Coetzee

This paper aims to respond to the strong calls for interdisciplinary solutions to address the many and varied challenges that major disasters create in urban (tourism…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to respond to the strong calls for interdisciplinary solutions to address the many and varied challenges that major disasters create in urban (tourism) spaces, and provide a holistic conceptualisation of organisational responses to disruptions in the external business environment. It argues that organisations need to actively (re)formulate a sustainable business proposition to passively adapt to environmental conditions and modify the selective environment.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a qualitative approach to introducing and examining the concepts and theoretical constructs underpinning the proposed conceptual schemata. The content-driven inductive approach used here is based on an extensive review of the disaster recovery, crisis management, entrepreneurial strategy and urban tourism literature with a focus on organisational perspectives. It systematically brings together the theories and research findings from these separate strands of literature.

Findings

While the extant literature focuses on the importance of effective adaptability to survive and thrive in environmental uncertainties, some aspects of the relevant evolutionary processes are not addressed in the context of urban tourism. Indeed, a systematic approach that questions how urban tourism and hospitality businesses react to crises has been long overdue. This paper, therefore, introduces niche construction theory (NCT) as an alternative and proposes an integrated framework to understand the environmental conditions of urban tourism and organisational evolution during post-disaster turbulence.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed model emerging from a multidisciplinary literature review acknowledges boundary conditions in the tourism industry-specific interpretation of a crisis situation. The tenets of NCT need to be adopted flexibly rather than as part of a strictly prescriptive process to allow for all aspects of the related business responses to play out and become exposed to the emerging selection pressures.

Practical implications

The argument underpinned by the theoretical constructs of niche construction encourages and offers a framework for practitioners to actively (re)formulate business proposition and (re)construct organisational niche to survive post-disaster turbulence in the business environment and exert influence over their own evolution.

Originality/value

This paper offers different angles, filters and lenses for constructing and interpreting knowledge of organisational evolution in the context of crisis management. The conceptual schema (Figure 2) emerged as a novel contribution itself providing a necessary lens to interpret the empirical data and understand the complexities of the organisational responses to the disruptive post-disaster turbulence in an urban tourism business environment.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 June 2021

Dimitra Dritsa and Nimish Biloria

This paper presents a critical review of studies which map the urban environment using continuous physiological data collection. A conceptual model is consequently…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents a critical review of studies which map the urban environment using continuous physiological data collection. A conceptual model is consequently presented for mitigating urban stress at the city and the user level.

Design/methodology/approach

The study reviews relevant publications, examining the tools used for data collection and the methods used for data analysis and data fusion. The relationship between urban features and physiological responses is also examined.

Findings

The review showed that the continuous monitoring of physiological data in the urban environment can be used for location-aware stress detection and urban emotion mapping. The combination of physiological and contextual data helps researchers understand how the urban environment affects the human body. The review indicated a relationship between some urban features (green, land use, traffic, isovist parameters) and physiological responses, though more research is needed to solidify the existence of the identified links. The review also identified many theoretical, methodological and practical issues which hinder further research in this area.

Originality/value

While there is large potential in this field, there has been no review of studies which map continuously physiological data in the urban environment. This study covers this gap and introduces a novel conceptual model for mitigating urban stress.

Details

Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 September 2022

Hossein Omrany, Amirhosein Ghaffarianhoseini, Ali Ghaffarianhoseini and Derek John Clements-Croome

This paper critically analysed 195 articles with the objectives of providing a clear understanding of the current City Information Modelling (CIM) implementations…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper critically analysed 195 articles with the objectives of providing a clear understanding of the current City Information Modelling (CIM) implementations, identifying the main challenges hampering the uptake of CIM and providing recommendations for the future development of CIM.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts the PRISMA method in order to perform the systematic literature review.

Findings

The results identified nine domains of CIM implementation including (1) natural disaster management, (2) urban building energy modelling, (3) urban facility management, (4) urban infrastructure management, (5) land administration systems, (6) improvement of urban microclimates, (7) development of digital twin and smart cities, (8) improvement of social engagement and (9) urban landscaping design. Further, eight challenges were identified that hinder the widespread employment of CIM including (1) reluctance towards CIM application, (2) data quality, (3) computing resources and storage inefficiency, (4) data integration between BIM and GIS and interoperability, (5) establishing a standardised workflow for CIM implementation, (6) synergy between all parties involved, (7) cybersecurity and intellectual property and (8) data management.

Originality/value

This is the first paper of its kind that provides a holistic understanding of the current implementation of CIM. The outcomes will benefit multiple target groups. First, urban planners and designers will be supplied with a status-quo understanding of CIM implementations. Second, this research introduces possibilities of CIM deployment for the governance of cities; hence the outcomes can be useful for policymakers. Lastly, the scientific community can use the findings of this study as a reference point to gain a comprehensive understanding of the field and contribute to the future development of CIM.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 September 2020

Leslie Mabon

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to emergent understandings in research into urban climate change-related disasters (such as extreme heat), which recognise that…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to emergent understandings in research into urban climate change-related disasters (such as extreme heat), which recognise that present-day actions or failures of cities to address climate risk are rooted in a historical context.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyses content of scientific journals produced by the not-for-profit Kyushu Environmental Evaluation Association in Fukuoka since the 1970s. The aim is to evaluate the shifting understanding and conception of a liveable urban environment within Fukuoka over time and assess how this narrative has informed capability to understand and manage extreme heat as an emergent disaster risk.

Findings

The strong technical competences enabling Fukuoka to undertake evidence-based management of risks from climate-related disasters today exist at least partially because of earlier environmental concerns within the city and an early emergence of techno-scientific competence within the city's research institutions working at the science–policy interface.

Originality/value

The findings suggest a need to avoid uncritically exporting “lessons” from apparent urban climate “success stories”, without full recognition of the historical context enabling production and utilisation of weather and climate knowledge in specific locations.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2021

A.S.M. Shuaib and Md Masud Parves Rana

What makes neighbourhood environment more walkable is an important question for urban planning and design research. The purpose of this paper is to explore this question…

Abstract

Purpose

What makes neighbourhood environment more walkable is an important question for urban planning and design research. The purpose of this paper is to explore this question through a case study of urban sidewalks in different contexts of urban neighbourhoods in Rajshahi city of Bangladesh.

Design/methodology/approach

Using participatory observation, Google street view and photography techniques, it examines the quality of the street facilities by demonstrating physical attributes of sidewalks and by analysing how various obstructions on them characterize neighbourhood walkability environment.

Findings

The findings suggest that the unusable sidewalks in Rajshahi city, Bangladesh, are a production of inadequate and inappropriate planning and design that unable to capitalize the functionality of sidewalks as a means of walking. It further argues that the urban planners and designers of streets have paid little attention to the diverse requirements of sidewalks in accordance with spatial and socio-economic categories of urban neighbourhoods.

Originality/value

This study adds insights about the urban sidewalks planning and design in the context of a developing country. It provides an empirical evidence about the constraints and potentials of making a walkable city.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

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