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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1995

Tom Redman and Brian P. Mathews

Examines managers′ attitudes to the use of upward and the moretraditional downward performance appraisal systems. The results aredrawn from a survey of UK managers. Finds…

Abstract

Examines managers′ attitudes to the use of upward and the more traditional downward performance appraisal systems. The results are drawn from a survey of UK managers. Finds that upward appraisal is viewed as being generally less acceptable than “traditional” appraisal systems. Potential applications appear to be directed towards development and counselling areas. Concerns that are expressed in the literature, e.g. retribution by vengeful managers or orchestrated campaigns by trade unions, were not found to be particularly prominent in practice.

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Personnel Review, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1992

Tom Redman and Ed Snape

Upward appraisal involves staff having a formal input into theirmanager’s or supervisor’s performance appraisal. Reviews the rationalefor the adoption of upward appraisal

Abstract

Upward appraisal involves staff having a formal input into their manager’s or supervisor’s performance appraisal. Reviews the rationale for the adoption of upward appraisal systems for manager’s, and identifies a number of key factors likely to contribute towards the more widespread use of upward appraisal. Describes upward appraisal systems in practice, reviewing what they are used for, who is appraised, what is appraised, and how the appraisals are conducted. Then discusses the effectiveness of upward appraisal, paying particular attention to its acceptability to managers, subordinates and trade unions. Finally, considers whether the transplant of what is largely an American practice can be more widely achieved in the UK and proposes some areas for future research.

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Personnel Review, vol. 21 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Brian P. Mathews and Tom Redman

Reports on the results from a survey of the attitudes of managers employed in the service sector towards upward appraisal. Describes what constitutes upward appraisal

Abstract

Reports on the results from a survey of the attitudes of managers employed in the service sector towards upward appraisal. Describes what constitutes upward appraisal. Discusses recent developments in the UK and in particular its application in the service sector. Examines the factor most critical to the success of any appraisal system ‐ its acceptability to the parties involved. Concludes with an examination of the implications of the findings for practitioners. The results indicate that strong feelings are held by some, both positive and negative, but these are difficult to attribute to particular groups. Many of the concerns expressed in the literature are found, on average, not to be major issues for service managers themselves.

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Career Development International, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Alma M. McCarthy and Thomas N. Garavan

360° feedback processes have gained popularity as a performance management and career development tool in contemporary organisations. This monograph explores the nature of…

Abstract

360° feedback processes have gained popularity as a performance management and career development tool in contemporary organisations. This monograph explores the nature of 360° feedback, investigates the factors which have influenced its emergence and contrasts it with more traditional performance management processes used by organisations. It specifically identifies the benefits and problems associated with 360° feedback in the context of management of performance and employee career development. The monograph considers the issues surrounding different sources of feedback, i.e. peer, subordinate and self. The monograph concludes with a discussion of the issues pertaining to the use of multi‐rater feedback as a tool for performance improvement and career development.

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Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1995

Christopher Rowe

Considers the benefits and pitfalls of 360‐degree feedback –drawing from experiences at British Petroleum (BP) and current thinkingat British Aerospace (BAe), Brough. A…

Abstract

Considers the benefits and pitfalls of 360‐degree feedback – drawing from experiences at British Petroleum (BP) and current thinking at British Aerospace (BAe), Brough. A distinction is made between “assessment” and “development” (necessary for understanding what appraisal is trying to achieve) and the different forms of appraisal – downward, upward, peer and self – are defined. The BAe Brough appraisal scheme is outlined and reference made to a “Manager as a Developer” training programme where the notion of 360‐degree feedback is being considered. Suggests there are 11 key issues that should be considered when introducing upward appraisal and that most of these also apply to peer appraisal and self appraisal. The BP scheme is used as a model for contrasting the author′s own views and those of his BAe colleagues. Concludes by warning of the dangers associated with 360‐degree feedback and favours, in most instances, an “informal, voluntary, qualitative” approach.

Details

Executive Development, vol. 8 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-3230

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Ebrahim Soltani

Reports findings from a research designed to investigate the main issues of the current human resource (HR) performance evaluation systems in over 150 UK‐based…

Abstract

Reports findings from a research designed to investigate the main issues of the current human resource (HR) performance evaluation systems in over 150 UK‐based quality‐focused organisations. The study identified the main characteristics of HR performance evaluation systems currently conducting in total quality management (TQM)‐based organisations. The research approach consisted of a questionnaire survey in a sample of cross‐section organisations in different economic sectors with enough experience of quality management to reflect the widest possible range of characteristics in the HR performance evaluation practices. The survey results provide the most recent details of the performance appraisal systems currently conducting in TQM organisations and their effectiveness in improving and achieving TQM objectives. Also discusses implications of these findings for HR performance evaluation system in general, and a quality‐driven HR performance evaluation in particular.

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Employee Relations, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2007

Mike Millmore, David Biggs and Laura Morse

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of gender on the performance assessments of managers arising from the 360‐degree scheme operated within the UK…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of gender on the performance assessments of managers arising from the 360‐degree scheme operated within the UK headquarters of a large multi‐international financial services organisation.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire approach was used to collect data on 66 managers (33 males and 33 females) against four broad capabilities on the 360‐degree appraisal system. Data were gathered on each of the 66 managers from eight different sources including the individual being appraised, three of their peers, three of their direct reports (subordinates) and their manager (supervisor).

Findings

Performance ratings were either gender neutral or higher for female than for male managers. Within the case company there was no evidence of unfavourable discrimination against female managers, if anything the reverse with female managers showing superior performance compared to their male counterparts.

Research limitations/implications

As with all cross‐sectional research causality cannot be confirmed and difficulties in accessing 360‐degree appraisal information for a large number of managers led to constraints on research methodology.

Practical implications

The implication for human resource management is that the 360‐degree appraisal system did not necessarily fulfil the degree of objectivity claimed by its adherents and that possible adverse influence may be inherent within the 360‐degree rating system of managers particularly.

Originality/value

The paper offers insights into gender differences within 360‐degree managerial performance appraisals.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2012

Sarah Lewis and John Arnold

The paper aims to improve knowledge of how organisational career management (OCM) techniques are used within the UK retail buying and merchandising (B&M) community.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to improve knowledge of how organisational career management (OCM) techniques are used within the UK retail buying and merchandising (B&M) community.

Design/methodology/approach

Using quantitative research methods via an online survey of B&M managers across 30 UK‐based retailers, this study explores the extent of OCM technique usage, buyers and merchandisers' evaluations of such techniques and the barriers to using them.

Findings

Internal job posting, performance appraisal for career development, induction, PDPs and competencies were the most commonly used. The most consistently favoured techniques were training/educational opportunities, career‐planning workshops, PDPs, induction and fast‐track programmes. In comparison to other studies, respondents perceived OCM techniques to be relatively unfair and identified the main barriers to their use as time/budget constraints, unsupportive management, poor technique development/implementation and poor employee attitude/ understanding.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides useful direction for retailers by recommending that they implement an OCM strategy that can be realistically carried out with the resources available, encourage a wider appreciation of OCM within the overall business strategy and attempt to determine the reasons for any perceived unfairness of OCM techniques within their organisation.

Originality/value

This study provides comprehensive information for use when considering OCM strategies. In particular it provides previously unavailable insight into OCM technique usage within the retail B&M community and is unique in its exploration of the perceived barriers to using such techniques in addition to measuring their usage and capturing perceptions surrounding their use.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 40 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Mohamed Zairi

This paper is one of a series of three, covering very comprehensively human resource practices in a global and generic context. The series of papers presents practices…

Abstract

This paper is one of a series of three, covering very comprehensively human resource practices in a global and generic context. The series of papers presents practices which are directly of relevance to the health‐care context, and which are based on proven, effective and pioneering approaches. The first paper covers practices based on British and European experiences, gathered from world‐class organisations that have either been finalists or went on to win prestigious quality awards such as the British and European Quality Awards. The benchmarking analysis presented in this paper is based on the sub‐criteria prescribed by the European Quality Awards Model, which include: how people resources are planned and improved; how the skills and capabilities of people are preserved and developed through recruitment, training and career progression; how people and teams agree targets and continuously review performance; how the involvement of everyone in continuous improvement is prompted and people empowered to take appropriate action; how effective top‐down and bottom‐up communication is achieved.

Details

Health Manpower Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-2065

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Pawan S. Budhwar and Yehuda Baruch

This paper examines and discusses the developments in the field of career management, bringing in the international perspective. In particular, the paper explores career…

Abstract

This paper examines and discusses the developments in the field of career management, bringing in the international perspective. In particular, the paper explores career management practices in 108 Indian organizations. A factor analysis procedure suggested five groups of practices: formal planning, formal active management, developmental, career stages and assessment. These are found to be associated with certain organizational and cultural characteristics. The research has both theoretical and practical implications.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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