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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Maria Mawson and Amy C. Haworth

This paper aims to outline work to support the employability agenda in the Library at the University of Sheffield, set in the context of debates about the nature of

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to outline work to support the employability agenda in the Library at the University of Sheffield, set in the context of debates about the nature of employability, employability skills and information literacy in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper starts with a brief review of literature on employability and student skills in the UK higher education sector, the place of information literacy as an employability attribute and information literacy in the workplace. It goes on to outline work done in the Library at the University of Sheffield to support the employability agenda. This includes the development of a commercial awareness workshop in collaboration with other services and the incorporation of student and alumni voices in an employability guide.

Findings

The literature reviewed highlights the differences between information literacy in the workplace and academia. This could present challenges and opportunities in promoting information literacy as an employability attribute. The case study highlights the benefits of working in collaboration with students and services beyond the library in the employability arena.

Originality/value

The approaches taken in Sheffield may be of interest to other institutions looking to develop support for the employability agenda.

Details

Information and Learning Science, vol. 119 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2014

Melanie T. Benson and Peter Willett

The purpose of this paper is to describe the historical development of library and information science (LIS) teaching and research in the University of Sheffield's…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the historical development of library and information science (LIS) teaching and research in the University of Sheffield's Information School since its founding in 1963.

Design/methodology/approach

The history is based on published materials, unpublished school records, and semi-structured interviews with 19 current or ex-members of staff.

Findings

The School has grown steadily over its first half-century, extending the range of its teaching from conventional programmes in librarianship and information science to include cognate programmes in areas such as health informatics, information systems and multi-lingual information management.

Originality/value

There are very few published accounts of the history of LIS departments.

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1972

W.L. Saunders

By one of those coincidences that seem to abound in academic life and are probably not coincidences at all, we have recently found ourselves, quite suddenly, in possession…

Abstract

By one of those coincidences that seem to abound in academic life and are probably not coincidences at all, we have recently found ourselves, quite suddenly, in possession of a very great deal of information about the language barrier and about the information requirements of the social sciences. This is a consequence of two recent publications: the Sheffield report on two years of intensive work on the language barrier in an academic community and Bath University Library's INFROSS report. The former looks at the language barrier from the point of view of all disciplines, including the social sciences; the latter looks at the information requirements and problems of social scientists from a very comprehensive point of view and includes amongst the problems that of the language barrier. The two reports therefore complement one another very well, and in my paper this evening I propose to draw on both of them, in an attempt to look at the language barrier from the social scientist's point of view. I shall normally draw more heavily on the Sheffield report than that of Bath—mainly because it is the one with which I am most familiar—though when I came to look at possible solutions, the Bath findings will certainly carry a good deal of weight, as you will see.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1997

Catherine Goddard, Peter Willett and Frances Wood

This paper reports a study of the use and value of MSc in Information Studies/Information Management dissertations produced during the seven years, 1988–89 to 1994–95, at…

Abstract

This paper reports a study of the use and value of MSc in Information Studies/Information Management dissertations produced during the seven years, 1988–89 to 1994–95, at the Department of Information Studies in the University of Sheffield. Responses to a questionnaire that was sent to students, supervisors and external collaborating organisations showed that they all used the dissertations in various ways, as did other Departmental staff and students. Some dissertations lead to publications in the open literature, and a citation analysis showed that these publications are successful in bringing dissertation results to a wider readership.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 49 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Chris Awre, Jim Baxter, Brian Clifford, Janette Colclough, Andrew Cox, Nick Dods, Paul Drummond, Yvonne Fox, Martin Gill, Kerry Gregory, Anita Gurney, Juliet Harland, Masud Khokhar, Dawn Lowe, Ronan O'Beirne, Rachel Proudfoot, Hardy Schwamm, Andrew Smith, Eddy Verbaan, Liz Waller, Laurian Williamson, Martin Wolf and Matthew Zawadzki

The purpose of this paper is to explore the usefulness of the concept to thinking about Research Data Management (RDM). The concept of “wicked problems” seeks to…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the usefulness of the concept to thinking about Research Data Management (RDM). The concept of “wicked problems” seeks to differentiate very complex, intractable challenges from tamer issues where approaches to problem solving are well-understood.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on and co-authored by a collaboration of practitioners from libraries, information technology and research administration, with facilitators from the Sheffield Information School. Participants worked together in two-day-long workshops to understand the wicked problem concept and advice on leadership in wicked problem contexts.

Findings

Participants concurred that RDM had many features of a wicked problem and most of Grint’s advice on leadership for wicked problems also resonated. Some elements of the issue were simple; participants were optimistic about improving the situation over time. Participants were resistant to the more negative or fatalistic connotations of the phrase “wicked problem”. Viewing RDM as a wicked problem is an interesting way of looking at it as a challenge for support professionals.

Practical implications

The notion of a wicked problem is a generative concept that can be usefully added to professional vocabulary.

Originality/value

The paper captures an in-depth response from practitioners to the notion of wicked problems as a lens for examining RDM.

Details

Library Review, vol. 64 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Frances Gordon, Claire Walsh, Michelle Marshall, Fiona Wilson and Tim Hunt

The modernisation agenda in health and social care is concerned with providing an integrated service for patients/clients and their carers. This paper focuses on the…

Abstract

The modernisation agenda in health and social care is concerned with providing an integrated service for patients/clients and their carers. This paper focuses on the nature of practice‐based learning environments that support the development of students as effective interprofessional practitioners for the modernised health and social care services.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 24 January 2018

Stefanie Buckner, Calum Mattocks, Melanie Rimmer and Louise Lafortune

The purpose of this paper is to report how an evaluation tool originally developed for Age-Friendly Cities was pilot-tested in the context of the Dementia Friendly…

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4110

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report how an evaluation tool originally developed for Age-Friendly Cities was pilot-tested in the context of the Dementia Friendly Community (DFC) initiative of the city of Sheffield/UK. It presents finding and outputs on which other communities with dementia friendly agendas can draw.

Design/methodology/approach

The original evaluation tool was adapted to a focus on dementia friendliness. Data collection involved scoping conversations, documentary analysis, interviews and group discussions. Following evidence appraisal, Sheffield’s approach to dementia friendliness was assessed. A local steering group was central to the study.

Findings

The evidence indicates areas of strength in Sheffield’s approach to dementia friendliness: involvement of older people; service provision; collaboration; monitoring and evaluation. Scope for improvement was identified around resource allocation, and use of existing guidance on dementia friendliness. Recommendations for policy and practice include enhancing pooling of resources, more detailed recording of resources allocated to dementia-related activity, and collection of evidence on how people affected by dementia have shaped the city’s DFC initiative. Key research outputs are an adaptable logic model and an emerging evaluation framework for DFCs.

Research limitations/implications

The study was a short pilot with limited resources. Its findings and outputs must be considered preliminary.

Originality/value

The findings and outputs provide a basis for further research. The study has suggested key components of an evaluation framework for DFCs. It is informing ongoing work to develop such a framework.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2009

Winnie Tam, Andrew M. Cox and Andy Bussey

The purpose of this paper is to identify the features that international student users prefer for next generation OPACs.

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2903

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the features that international student users prefer for next generation OPACs.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 16 international students of the University of Sheffield were interviewed in July 2008 to explore their preferences among potential features in next generation OPACs. A semi‐structured interview schedule with images of mock‐up screens was used.

Findings

The results of the interviews were broadly consistent with previous studies. In general, students expect features in next generation OPACs should save their time, be easy to use and relevant to their search. This study found that recommender features and features that can provide better navigation of search results are desired by users. However, Web 2.0 features, such as RSS feeds and those features which involved user participation were among the least popular.

Practical implications

This paper produces findings of relevance to any academic library seeking to implement a next‐generation OPAC.

Originality/value

There have been no previous published research studies of users' preferences among possible features of next‐generation OPACs.

Details

Program, vol. 43 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

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Article
Publication date: 2 June 2014

Richard Laughlin

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the life of Tony Lowe, Emeritus Professor of Accounting and Financial Management at the University of Sheffield, who died on 5…

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773

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the life of Tony Lowe, Emeritus Professor of Accounting and Financial Management at the University of Sheffield, who died on 5 March 2014. It celebrates Tony Lowe’s considerable direct contributions to accounting knowledge and, possibly more significantly, his indirect contribution through his enabling of a range of those associated with him at Sheffield to become scholars of distinction in their own right.

Design/methodology/approach

Publication review, personal reflections and argument.

Findings

Apart from providing insight into Tony Lowe's direct contribution to accounting knowledge through an analysis of a range of significant sole authored and joint authored publications, the paper gives rather more attention to his more indirect enabling contribution. In this regard it traces the development of initially the Management Control Association and subsequently the “Sheffield School” to Tony Lowe, clarifying the values that underlie these groups. It also clarifies how some of the key elements that have allowed the now global Interdisciplinary and Critical Perspectives on Accounting (ICPA) Project to exist and flourish are traceable to Tony Lowe and the “Sheffield School” he created.

Research limitations/implications

This paper provides an important historical analysis of the direct and indirect influence of a unique scholar on the beginnings and development of particularly the now global ICPA Project. This history is personal and maybe selective and possibly limited because of this but hopefully will encourage others to investigate the claims further.

Originality/value

The history of the ICPA Project has only partially been told before. This is another part of this history that has not been analysed before on which further work can build.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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