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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

D.R. Black, J.D. Ericson, T.J. Harvey, M.C. Hayden and J.J. Thompson

Attempts to trace the history and development of the Master of EducationDegree at the University of Bath. Highlights the comparatively smalldifferences which exist between…

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Abstract

Attempts to trace the history and development of the Master of Education Degree at the University of Bath. Highlights the comparatively small differences which exist between the Bath MEd and those from other institutions, namely: its greater flexibility in allowing students to “pay as they earn” and take as long as they wish in building up their portfolios of modules; the three modes of studying the modules, i.e. taught, distance learning and school‐based tuition; the linking of taught and school‐based modules; and the introduction of a Summer School for outstation students. These features have enabled the University of Bath to offer the course, on a part‐time basis, to teachers living considerable distances away, particularly those living and working overseas.

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International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Danish Mishra, Steve Cayzer and Tracey Madden

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of interactions between learners in a massive open online course (MOOC), particularly role of the tutors in such…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of interactions between learners in a massive open online course (MOOC), particularly role of the tutors in such interactions. For educators concerned with sustainability literacy, the authors are necessarily both affected by, and effectors of, digital pedagogies. The call for papers for this special issue challenged the authors to consider whether digital pedagogies are “supportive of sustainability or perpetuators of unsustainability”. As might be expected, this question is not a simple binary choice and the authors have chosen to address it indirectly, by considering the nature of interaction in a global, digitally connected community of learners. In particular, the changing role of tutors in these communities, and the possible implications of this change on sustainable literacy, are examined.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors focus on the “Sustainability for Professionals” massive open online course (MOOC) delivered by the University of Bath on the FutureLearn platform which hosts the “Inside Cancer” MOOC, also from Bath. “Sustainability for Professionals” is pedagogically connectivist, with “Inside Cancer” being more traditional and instructor led. The authors used social network analysis (SNA) for the research. It is a key tool to understand interactions in an online environment and allows quantitative comparison between different networks and thus between courses. In the context of digital pedagogy, the authors used a number of relevant SNA metrics to carry out analysis of MOOC network structures.

Findings

It was found that MOOCs are different in their network structure but tend to adapt to the subject matter. Digital pedagogies for sustainability result in a qualitative as well as quantitative change in learning where course design affects the learning process and gatekeepers are critical for information flow. These gatekeepers are distinct from tutors in the network. In such a network, tutors’ role is limited to course delivery and verifying, depending on course content, the information within the network. The analysis shows that network learning is dependent on course design and content, and gatekeepers exercise influence over the information within the network.

Originality/value

This study has implications for sustainability literacy. The authors examined the extent to which patterns of interaction in the network affect the learning process, and how this can help participants engage with the concept of sustainability. They used SNA to explore the nature of interaction between learners in a MOOC, particularly the role of the tutors in mediating such interactions. They also found that tutors can and do take a central role in early runs of the MOOC; however, with the subsequent runs, the removal of tutor nodes has little effect, suggesting that different modes of learning driven by participants are possible in a MOOC community.

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On the Horizon, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Bob Little

The purpose of this paper is to set out the results of research which shows the gender pay gap among graduates and outline some of the steps being taken to combat this at…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to set out the results of research which shows the gender pay gap among graduates and outline some of the steps being taken to combat this at the University of Bath. Notably, it highlights the Sprint programme, developed for women undergraduates. This programme aims to add value to the overall student experience at university, improve employability and help to ensure that each undergraduate – regardless of her subject, department or career aspirations – can develop to her fullest potential.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper outlines the Sprint programme and reports on how it is being used specifically by the University of Bath. It contains the results of interviews with the deliverers, sponsors and stakeholders of the Sprint programme.

Findings

The Sprint programme helps women focus on their studies at university, achieving results such as improved visibility and effectiveness in tutorials, better time management, less study stress, a boost in confidence and self-esteem. They also use Sprint to sharpen their career goals, raise their aspirations, explore possibilities and to take advantage of the work shadowing, internships and mentoring often offered by corporate sponsors.

Research limitations/implications

It is possible to bridge the gender pay gap as well as benefit women in other ways via learning and development activities, such as those promoted via the Sprint programme.

Practical implications

With help from programmes such as Sprint, women can achieve improved work visibility and effectiveness, better time management, reduced stress, increased confidence and self-esteem. This helps them achieve their career goals, raise their aspirations and generally develop their careers.

Social implications

Women can learn to compete effectively with men in the workplace as well as be successful in their personal lives (in terms of sorting out difficult relationships, improving fitness and gaining a better study/life balance). This offers many benefits for women – and for the well-being of society in general.

Originality/value

The Sprint programme is unique – and is, increasingly, proving valuable. Although the Sprint programme is relatively new – having started in 2013 – it is already bearing positive results. This is not just true in terms of narrowing the gender pay gap but also in terms of improved business networking and heightened self-confidence among other factors.

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Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 48 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1972

W.L. Saunders

By one of those coincidences that seem to abound in academic life and are probably not coincidences at all, we have recently found ourselves, quite suddenly, in possession…

Abstract

By one of those coincidences that seem to abound in academic life and are probably not coincidences at all, we have recently found ourselves, quite suddenly, in possession of a very great deal of information about the language barrier and about the information requirements of the social sciences. This is a consequence of two recent publications: the Sheffield report on two years of intensive work on the language barrier in an academic community and Bath University Library's INFROSS report. The former looks at the language barrier from the point of view of all disciplines, including the social sciences; the latter looks at the information requirements and problems of social scientists from a very comprehensive point of view and includes amongst the problems that of the language barrier. The two reports therefore complement one another very well, and in my paper this evening I propose to draw on both of them, in an attempt to look at the language barrier from the social scientist's point of view. I shall normally draw more heavily on the Sheffield report than that of Bath—mainly because it is the one with which I am most familiar—though when I came to look at possible solutions, the Bath findings will certainly carry a good deal of weight, as you will see.

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Aslib Proceedings, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1980

PHILIP BRYANT

The nature and purpose of the catalogue has been the focus of considerable and vigorous debate during the past decade. This article attempts to identify those topics which…

Abstract

The nature and purpose of the catalogue has been the focus of considerable and vigorous debate during the past decade. This article attempts to identify those topics which have been the most significant causes of the debate and discusses: the need for catalogues; users and non‐users; the nature of the bibliographic record and catalogue entry; the development of UK and LC MARC; standards, including exchange formats, the development of the ISBD, and the concept of UBC (Universal Bibliographic Control); the Anglo‐American Cataloguing Rules and the controversy over the implementation of AACR2; COM catalogues; subsets of the MARC record; co‐operatives, networks and resource sharing; and the development of subject access methods better suited to COM and online catalogues. The relevance of catalogue research activities at Bath University and elsewhere is highlighted.

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Journal of Documentation, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1994

D.R. Black, T.J. Harvey, M.C. Hayden and J.J. Thompson

Outlines the programme “Professional Development for Teachers inInternational Schools” which was developed from a modular programmealready in existence at the School of

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2109

Abstract

Outlines the programme “Professional Development for Teachers in International Schools” which was developed from a modular programme already in existence at the School of Education, at the University of Bath. The Professional Development Programme is taught both in the UK Summer School and overseas. There are two types of module, taught and school‐based, for which there is no predetermined order of study. The programme leads to an Advanced Certificate, Advanced Diploma or Master′s Degree in Education. The pilot programme was held at the International School of Tanganyika during Easter 1992 and the programme has subsequently evolved and expanded and now includes not only teachers in international schools but also teachers in other English medium schools in countries in Europe, Africa, the Middle East and the Far East.

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International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

John Nicholls, John Harris, Eleanor Morgan, Ken Clarke and David Sims

Given the increasing competition in higher education, includingthat on MBA degrees, it is surprising that more attention has not beenpaid to marketing issues, such as are…

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Abstract

Given the increasing competition in higher education, including that on MBA degrees, it is surprising that more attention has not been paid to marketing issues, such as are educational institutions really “customer‐oriented”?; do they choose the most appropriate market segments?; the complexities of the decision processes of the “buyers”. Looks first at general issues facing educational marketers, and then examines the marketing of MBA degrees in the light of theory, of previous survey data and of evidence arising from their collective experience. Concludes that, whether the “customer” is an individual student or a company, a greater understanding of buyer behaviour is needed; business schools should improve their marketing or stand accused of not practising what they preach.

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International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 30 January 2021

Sally McGuire, Alex Stephens and Emma Griffith

This paper aims to describe a service evaluation study of “Balance” – a National Health Service Tier 2 pilot weight management course delivered in a primary care mental…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe a service evaluation study of “Balance” – a National Health Service Tier 2 pilot weight management course delivered in a primary care mental health service. The 12 weekly sessions included dietetic, psychological and behavioural elements underpinned by cognitive behavioural theory and “third-wave” approaches, including acceptance and commitment therapy, compassion-focused therapy and mindfulness.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-methods design was used in this service evaluation study that included analysis of outcome measures (weight, eating choices, weight-related self-efficacy and mental health) and focus group data (n = 6) analysed using thematic analysis. Eleven clients with a body mass index of 25–40 kg/m2 enrolled, and nine clients completed the course. Outcome data were collected weekly with follow-up at three and six months.

Findings

Quantitative data analysis using non-parametric Wilcoxon signed-rank tests showed that the group mean weight decreased significantly (p = 0.030) by the end of Balance, but the group mean weight loss was not statistically significant at the three-month (p = 0.345) or six-month (p = 0.086) follow-up. The qualitative results showed that participants valued the course ethos of choice and also welcomed learning new tools and techniques. Balance was very well-received by participants who reported benefitting from improved well-being, group support and developing new weight management skills.

Research limitations/implications

Only one client attended all sessions of the group, and it is possible that missed sessions impacted effectiveness. Some of the weight change data collected at the six-month follow-up was self-reported (n = 4), which could reduce data reliability. Focus group participants were aware that Balance was a pilot with a risk that the group would not be continued. As the group wanted the pilot to be extended, the feedback may have been positively skewed. A small sample size limits interpretation of the results. A group weight management intervention, including dietetic, psychological and behavioural elements, underpinned by cognitive behavioural theory was well-received by service users and effective for some. Commissioners and service users may have different definitions of successful outcomes in weight management interventions.

Practical implications

Longer-term support and follow-up after Tier 2 weight management interventions may benefit service users and improve outcomes.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to a small but growing evidence base concerned with the design and delivery of weight management interventions. Areas of particular interest include: a gap analysis between the course content and National Institute for Health and Care Excellence clinical guidelines, participants’ views on the most impactful course features and recommendations for course development. The results also show a disconnect between evidence-based guidelines (mandatory weight monitoring), participants’ preferences and clinicians' experience. The difference between client and commissioner priorities is also discussed.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2020

Lucy Fiddick, Emily Neale, Falguni Nathwani, Kristina Bennert and James Gregory

Evidence-based psychological therapies are available for severe and enduring mental health problems, but resources and access to these are limited within England…

Abstract

Purpose

Evidence-based psychological therapies are available for severe and enduring mental health problems, but resources and access to these are limited within England. Practitioners in community mental health teams (CMHTs) can act as gatekeepers for access to psychological therapies for those in secondary care, but little is known about how they make referral decisions. This paper aims to understand how CMHT practitioners make decisions about who to refer or not, to secondary care psychological therapy services (PTS).

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 11 CMHT practitioners were interviewed to understand the decision making processes underpinning their referrals or otherwise, to a PTS within NHS England. The data were analysed qualitatively using thematic analysis.

Findings

Thematic analysis resulted in 11 sub-themes under three main themes of the self, the organisation and wider structure and the service user. Results indicated that some participants were referred automatically for psychological therapy if a service user asked or if there was external pressure to refer, while others’ decisions were informed by contextual information such as the service user’s ability to engage or change, risk status and limited organisational resources.

Originality/value

This study explores the decision making of multi-disciplinary professionals referring to PTS. The findings have important implications for understanding some of the factors that can influence patient access to psychological treatment in secondary care.

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Article
Publication date: 19 November 2021

Hannah Rettie, Joya Georgewill, Sarah Stacey and Emma Griffith

The benefits of including a psychosocial group programme alongside a medical inpatient detoxification and stabilisation regime has been recognised within addiction…

Abstract

Purpose

The benefits of including a psychosocial group programme alongside a medical inpatient detoxification and stabilisation regime has been recognised within addiction research; however, a “gold standard” psychosocial intervention has not been established. This small-scale study aimed to evaluate the psychosocial group (“Straight Ahead”) currently running at a substance use inpatient unit based in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-methods questionnaire design aimed to capture service user perspectives of the group programme via a questionnaire and assess whether an individual’s recovery capital and emotion regulation scores improved during their stay.

Findings

Thirty-four service users participated in the evaluation. Results indicate the group significantly increased individuals’ recovery capital scores; however, it did not significantly improve emotion regulation. The three themes from the qualitative results focused on the importance of shared experiences, learning of new skills and the group as a positive experience. Service users provided suggestions for improvements, and these informed the provision of service-specific recommendations for the team and project commissioner.

Originality/value

The evaluation provides tentative support for the use of the Straight Ahead programme and provides an insight into what service users find helpful when attending a psychosocial group during an inpatient detoxification admission.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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