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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Mark Dooris

As settings‐based health promotion has gained ascendancy within the field, there has been increased interest in applying the approach within a diversity of contexts, one…

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Abstract

As settings‐based health promotion has gained ascendancy within the field, there has been increased interest in applying the approach within a diversity of contexts, one of the most recent being higher education. The University of Central Lancashire became one of the first few universities in Europe to establish a Health Promoting University initiative when it appointed a co‐ordinator in 1995. This article critically discusses the emergence of the settings‐based approach to health promotion and its application to the higher education sector. Focusing on the University of Central Lancashire as a case study, it considers the development of Health Promoting Universities. It is argued that while the settings‐based approach still faces the challenge of establishing clarity and consistency, the Health Promoting University does have the potential to provide a robust conceptual framework that can enable the practical development and implementation of an holistic, comprehensive and integrative approach to promoting health. The article ends with some reflections on challenges, opportunities and future directions.

Details

Health Education, vol. 101 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 17 February 2021

Mark Dooris, Susan Powell, Doug Parkin and Alan Farrier

This paper reports on a research study examining opportunities for and characteristics of effective leadership for whole university approaches to health, well-being and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper reports on a research study examining opportunities for and characteristics of effective leadership for whole university approaches to health, well-being and sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-method qualitative approach was used: semi-structured interviews and focus groups were conducted with vice chancellors (n = 12) and UK Healthy Universities Network members (n = 10) and online questionnaires were completed by non-UK network coordinators (n = 6) and non-UK health promoting university coordinators (n = 10), supplemented with two interviews.

Findings

A total of two overarching themes emerged: opportunities to secure and sustain effective senior-level leadership and characteristics of effective senior-level leadership. Sub-themes under “Opportunities” included aligning work with core business so that health and well-being becomes a strategic priority, harnessing the personal qualities and values of senior-level advocates and using charters and policy drivers as levers to engage and catalyse action. Sub-themes under “Characteristics” included commitment to whole university/whole system working; an understanding that health underpins core business and is a strategic priority; enabling effective coordination through appropriate resourcing; balancing top-down and distributed leadership models and complementing strategic leadership with cultural change.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to explore leadership in relation to health promoting universities. Drawing on the findings, it presents a guide to developing and securing effective leadership for health promoting universities – of value to researchers, practitioners and policymakers worldwide.

Details

Health Education, vol. 121 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Cathy Dunne and Maggie Somerset

This qualitative research was designed to investigate students' health needs and their views on health promotion in a University. A total of 31 students participated in…

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Abstract

This qualitative research was designed to investigate students' health needs and their views on health promotion in a University. A total of 31 students participated in focus group discussions. Inductive analysis revealed two central themes: student health concerns and health promotion in a University setting. The former included issues associated with adjustment to life at University, health‐related lifestyle behaviours and provision of support services. The key areas highlighted for health promotion were alcohol and drug use, healthy eating and mental health. Participants' views on health promotion centred on the use of campaigns, which were felt to be a proactive and suitable means of targeting students with health messages; however, numerous recommendations to improve their efficacy emerged. Additional interventions to complement rather than replace campaigns were considered appropriate. By identifying the health concerns of students, this research has highlighted the areas on which future health promotion activity should focus and has suggested methods by which it could be delivered.

Details

Health Education, vol. 104 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 10 November 2014

Robert Detmering, Anna Marie Johnson, Claudene Sproles, Samantha McClellan and Rosalinda Hernandez Linares

– The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

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5597

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

Design/methodology/approach

Introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2013.

Findings

Provides information about each source, discusses the characteristics of current scholarship and describes sources that contain unique scholarly contributions and quality reproductions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 42 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Richard D. Waters, Rachel R. Canfield, Jenny M. Foster and Eva E. Hardy

The purpose of this paper is to examine how US universities' health centers are using dialogue and engagement on social networking sites to educate students and their…

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1659

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how US universities' health centers are using dialogue and engagement on social networking sites to educate students and their followers about health issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a content analysis of health centers' Facebook profiles, the research team examines the use of Kent and Taylor's dialogic principles of communication.

Findings

Results indicate that when a health center attracts a large number of followers online, their usage of the outlet as a dialogic tool increases significantly.

Practical implications

The study found that university health centers have a presence on Facebook, but they really are not using the site strategically to gain followers and educate them about health issues that they have pledged to address on their campuses.

Originality/value

The dialogic principles of communication have been examined significantly on web sites and blogs, but this is one of the first studies to test them in the social networking site environment.

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Juan Pablo Sarmiento

The purpose of this paper is to map out and characterize existing health-promotion initiatives at Florida International University (FIU) in the USA in order to inform…

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2656

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to map out and characterize existing health-promotion initiatives at Florida International University (FIU) in the USA in order to inform decision makers involved in the development of a comprehensive and a long-term healthy university strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

This study encompasses a narrative literature review on health promotion in higher education institutions and the identification and characterization of the various health-promotion initiatives associated with the subject of healthy universities at FIU. The characterization of health-promoting initiatives relied on the stakeholder analysis approach. Using the information obtained from this study, a map for promoting health initiatives with their location, capacities, leadership, and resources was established.

Findings

Most publications on health-promoting universities are limited to partial experiences’ reproduction. Self-financing health-promoting initiatives foster competition and work in silos. Gains of health-promotion interventions require governance, participation, and academic considerations. This study highlights the need for standards and minimum requirements for the mapping and characterization of health-promoting initiatives within institutions of higher education. The health-promotion strategy should fall within the university’s social responsibility policy.

Originality/value

This study helps identify organizational strengths and weaknesses and can inform decision makers seeking to establish policies and strategies as well as defining priorities and courses of action for healthy universities.

Details

Health Education, vol. 117 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Book part
Publication date: 23 June 2020

George Richard Lueddeke

Environmental degradation, economic and political threats along with ideological extremism necessitate a global redirection toward sustainability and well-being. Since the…

Abstract

Environmental degradation, economic and political threats along with ideological extremism necessitate a global redirection toward sustainability and well-being. Since the survival of all species (humans, animals, and plants) is wholly dependent on a healthy planet, urgent action at the highest levels to address large-scale interconnected problems is needed to counter the thinking that perpetuates the “folly of a limitless world.” Paralleling critical societal roles played by universities – ancient, medieval, and modern – throughout the millennia, this chapter calls for all universities and higher education institutions (HEIs) generally – estimated at over 28,000 – to take a lead together in tackling the pressing complex and intractable challenges that face us. There are about 250 million students in tertiary education worldwide rising to about 600 million by 2040. Time is not on our side. While much of the groundwork has been done by the United Nations (UN) and civil society, concerns remain over the variable support given to the UN-2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), especially in light of the negative impact of global biodiversity loss on achieving the UN-2030 SDGs. Ten propositions for global sustainability, ranging from adopting the SDGs at national and local levels to ensuring peaceful uses of technology and UN reforms in line with global socioeconomic shifts, are provided for consideration by decisionmakers. Proposition #7 calls for the unifying One Health & Well-Being (OHWB) concept to become the cornerstone of our educational systems as well as societal institutions and to underpin the UN-2030 SDGs. Recognizing the need to change our worldview (belief systems) from human-centrism to eco-centrism, and re-building of trust in our institutions, the chapter argues for the re-conceptualization of the university/higher education purpose and scope focusing on the development of an interconnected ecological knowledge system with a concern for the whole Earth – and beyond. The 2019 novel coronavirus has made clear that the challenges facing our world cannot be solved by individual nations alone and that there is an urgency to committing to shared global values that reflect the OHWB concept and approach. By drawing on our collective experience and expertise informed by the UN-2030 SDGs, we will be in a much stronger position to shape and strengthen multilateral strategies to achieve the UN-2030 Transformative Vision – “ending poverty, hunger, inequality and protecting the Earth’s natural resources,” and thereby helping “to save the world from itself.”

Details

Civil Society and Social Responsibility in Higher Education: International Perspectives on Curriculum and Teaching Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-464-4

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2021

Yuan Meng, Li Dong, Rui Guan and Yan Zhang

The study aims to find out the university students' health information service needs in post-COVID-19 age and then consider how to do the health information services well…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to find out the university students' health information service needs in post-COVID-19 age and then consider how to do the health information services well and promote it in further work.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses Kano model to design a questionnaire about university students' health information service needs from academic library and investigates 243 students from seven universities in China. The data generated were analyzed using a statistical tool and presented in tables.

Findings

The results show the students' different requirements level of health information services from academic library as must-be requirements, one-dimensional requirements, attractive quality attributes and indifferent quality in post-COVID-19 age.

Research limitations/implications

The questionnaire design and the scale of respondents have limitation, such as only focus on Chinese university, have not characteristically research on different group of students. It could optimize to cover more worldwide university students and refer to different groups of students' needs in further research.

Originality/value

The paper expands and deepens the theory about university library health information service and provides a practical reference and proposes some suggestions for academic libraries on how to carry out health information services and give the social health institutions inspiration on how to promote the health services, especially in post-COVID-19 age.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Book part
Publication date: 20 November 2015

Nick Rowe

This chapter describes and analyzes a project offering university-based courses to local people with mental health problems. Converge is a partnership between York St John…

Abstract

This chapter describes and analyzes a project offering university-based courses to local people with mental health problems. Converge is a partnership between York St John University and the National Health Service (NHS) that is built on a convergence of interests of the two organizations: real world experience for university students and good quality, non-stigmatizing courses for people with mental health problems. Three key principles of the project will be considered: to work with participants as students and to frame the provision as education, not therapy; to involve university students in the delivery of the courses and in the support of participants; and to work closely with the university and mental health providers in order to offer a resource that supports social integration and recovery.

It will be proposed that this partnership provides the conditions for the creation of a “healing campus”: an attempt to heal the “fracture” between people who experience mental health problems and their communities that began with their disappearance into large mental hospitals in the 18th and 19th centuries. The healing that this chapter examines is not merely of people who identify as having mental health problems but of a social and cultural fracture revealed in the stigma and shame that still surrounds mental ill health.

Details

University Partnerships for Community and School System Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-132-3

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine the knowledge and attitudes of the physicians regarding human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), to emphasize that these patients exist and they will exist in the future and to raise awareness so as to prevent that their rights to treatment are revoked.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey was conducted via a link sent through an online system. Random physicians from 81 cities of the country were invited to the survey. The survey has 41 questions regarding knowledge and attitudes in total, including epidemiological information such as age, gender and title.

Findings

A total of 3,107 physicians has voluntarily participated in the study. In total, 2,195 (70.7%) are internal physicians and 912 (29.3%) are surgical physicians among the participant physicians. In total, 1,452 (46.7%) of the participants are specialist physicians, 608 (19.6%) of the participants are practising physician and the rest of it is physician assistants, academicians and dentists, respectively.

Originality/value

In this study, it has been found out that the physicians have a lack of knowledge on HIV/AIDS and they adopt a discriminatory attitude towards HIV-positive persons. HIV-positive patients who are exposed to discrimination and scared of being uncovered refrain from applying to hospitals for treatment, which puts public health into jeopardy due to the high viral load and these patients are faced with difficulties in coping with both medical and emotional load of the disease.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

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