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1 – 10 of over 2000
Article
Publication date: 4 September 2019

Emma O’Brien, Thomas M. Cooney and Per Blenker

Entrepreneurship education has moved from an elitist view focussing on a start-up and picking-the-winners philosophy towards a broader enterprising behaviour approach;…

Abstract

Purpose

Entrepreneurship education has moved from an elitist view focussing on a start-up and picking-the-winners philosophy towards a broader enterprising behaviour approach; recognising entrepreneurship as an activity of relevance for everybody. The purpose of this paper is to extend this development and identify how university entrepreneurial ecosystems can be expanded to support communities that are under-represented in entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on an integrative literature review (Torraco, 2005), this paper draws together and synthesises literature from the field of entrepreneurship, higher education studies and under-represented communities in an integrated fashion, leading to the development of a new conceptual model.

Findings

This paper challenges the traditional role of universities in supporting entrepreneurship as focussing mainly on economic growth and new venture creation, and identifies how universities are also positioned to provide greater civic support to entrepreneurial learning amongst under-represented communities. Through a critical analysis of the literature, the conceptual model proposed identifies six key considerations in the expansion of university entrepreneurial ecosystems for under-represented communities.

Practical implications

There are currently 96.6m people at risk of poverty and social exclusion in the EU (OECD, 2017) and an estimated 43.1m Americans (US Census Bureau, 2017). This paper explores how university entrepreneurial ecosystems can be expanded to support minority and disadvantaged communities who are under-represented in terms of entrepreneurial activity.

Originality/value

Given that there is little research regarding how universities might activate inclusive entrepreneurship initiatives amongst under-represented communities, this paper expands existing knowledge as it identifies the key considerations encompassing university-led community collaborative enterprise support.

Article
Publication date: 26 November 2018

Saurav Pathak

The purpose of this study is to make strategic recommendations that benefit under-represented entrepreneurship (UE).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to make strategic recommendations that benefit under-represented entrepreneurship (UE).

Design/methodology/approach

The approach toward suggesting the proposed strategic recommendations is conceptual in nature. Blumberg’s theory of nested level of resource structure and McPherson’s theory of homophily will be invoked.

Findings

Under-represented entrepreneurship would benefit from initiating key resource identification and acquisition at a meso-level, i.e. within one’s own community in the first place and engaging in community-based collaborative and collective entrepreneurship.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed strategies have not been validated empirically.

Originality/value

The beneficial effects of implementing these strategies for UE will be felt in stages. First, communities will emerge as entrepreneurial as a whole. Subsequently, societal-level attribution of these communities as “entrepreneurial communities” will occur providing the necessary visibility and acceptance they would need to participate, contribute and get blended with more traditional entrepreneurship without distinction or prejudice.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 13 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 October 2019

Emma O’Brien and Thomas M. Cooney

A decade after the 2008 global financial crisis, economic growth is returning to many OECD countries and EU states. However, a “rising tide does not lift all boats” and…

Abstract

A decade after the 2008 global financial crisis, economic growth is returning to many OECD countries and EU states. However, a “rising tide does not lift all boats” and there are currently 96.6 million people at risk of poverty and social exclusion in the EU (OECD, 2017). Addressing this concerning social situation, requires innovative approaches and it has been suggested that inclusive entrepreneurship may be part of the solution. Yet, many under-represented groups (in terms of entrepreneurial activity) face significant barriers to entrepreneurship. This research study identifies how Higher Education Institutions can utilise their multidisciplinary knowledge and expertise in partnership with government, industry and civil society to address the economic and social challenges within under-represented communities by engendering higher levels of enterprising behaviour. Emerging studies in the literature have demonstrated how some Higher Education Institutions are providing tailored and holistic enterprise support to under-represented groups in their communities. However, such initiatives are not common and there is little research on how other HEIs might replicate inclusive entrepreneurship initiatives. Through the presentation of a conceptual model, this chapter identifies how HEIs can move outside of their formal education setting and dynamically support the development of enterprising competencies and behaviours amongst people within their local communities. The findings highlight six key areas for consideration in such developments including: 1. Teaching and Learning; 2. Resources; 3. Infrastructure; 4. Multidisciplinary Approaches; 5. Stakeholders and 6. Culture. These findings highlight the requirements for impactful HEI-community engagement and suggest that HEI community engagement through entrepreneurial education is a novel way of adding value for both under-represented communities and HEIs.

Details

Management and Administration of Higher Education Institutions at Times of Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-628-1

Keywords

Abstract

Details

From Access to Engagement and Beyond
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80382-037-8

Article
Publication date: 28 March 2008

Marilia Angove, Caryl Cresswell, Rubina Akhtar, Justine Rolfe, David Brooksbank and Brychan Thomas

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the Cyfenter Development Partnership action research programme primarily aimed at under‐represented entrepreneurs in Wales. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the Cyfenter Development Partnership action research programme primarily aimed at under‐represented entrepreneurs in Wales. The Welsh Assembly Government and the EQUAL initiative of the European Social Fund support the programme with the objective of informing and developing inclusive policies, strategies and practices within mainstream enterprise support.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used to identify the needs of under‐represented groups when establishing a business and barriers to the start‐up process has been action research, which combines both information gathering and facilitation of change.

Findings

The research data indicate that all under‐represented groups face similar challenges and issues and many experiences are not exclusive to any one particular group. Financial risk, lack of collateral and self‐finance were significant issues for the under‐represented groups.

Research limitations/implications

Although the overall response rate of 12 per cent for the telephone and postal surveys was low, it was felt that the responses were sufficient for the study to proceed as further qualitative data gathering was undertaken.

Practical implications

Through the empowerment of excluded entrepreneurs, to express and suggest potential solutions, it is expected that policies and practices can be leveraged where enterprise support can become more relevant and appropriate for all. It is also expected that this will lead a greater number of under‐represented entrepreneurs to access mainstream enterprise support.

Originality/value

A key objective of the programme is to create and facilitate a platform for direct communication between under‐represented groups, policy makers and enterprise support provision, within a solutions‐oriented context.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 4 October 2019

Abstract

Details

Management and Administration of Higher Education Institutions at Times of Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-628-1

Article
Publication date: 10 December 2009

Kajal Patel and Ian Shaw

This paper explores issues surrounding the under‐representation of people from the Gujarati community in mental health statistics and services in the UK and asks why…

Abstract

This paper explores issues surrounding the under‐representation of people from the Gujarati community in mental health statistics and services in the UK and asks why people from the Gujarati communities are less likely to seek assistance for mental health problems. It is well known that members of the African‐Caribbean community are over‐represented in mental health statistics, and this is attributed to factors such as racial discrimination, social adversity and stress of migration. However, members of the Gujarati community have also been exposed to these hardships, but are not similarly represented in the mental health statistics. The paper explores a selection of the key literature. Two questions are considered: first, whether this group genuinely has very good mental health (and if so why); and second, whether there are any factors that hold members of this community back from seeking help.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 July 2019

Sara Meddings, Lucy Walsh, Louise Patmore, Katie Louise Emily McKenzie and Sophie Holmes

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether one Recovery College reflects its community.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether one Recovery College reflects its community.

Design/methodology/approach

Recovery College students’ demographics and protected characteristics were compared with the general population and the population of people using local mental health services.

Findings

Recovery College students were representative of the local community in terms of ethnicity, religion or belief and sexual orientation. Fewer Recovery College students were over 60 years old or men.

Practical implications

Recovery Colleges may be more accessible to people who are often under-served and under-represented in mainstream mental health services, including people from BAME backgrounds and people who identify as LGBT. Recovery Colleges may need to engage more men and more older people. Recovery Colleges aim to be inclusive and open to all but need to ensure that this is a reality in practice.

Originality/value

This is the first study to explore who accesses Recovery Colleges and whether they are inclusive and open to all.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 July 2020

Isa Mutlib

This paper outlines the UK Government's move to increase the numbers of apprentices. It explores how employers are looking to increase take up of apprenticeships with…

176

Abstract

Purpose

This paper outlines the UK Government's move to increase the numbers of apprentices. It explores how employers are looking to increase take up of apprenticeships with focus on Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) communities, the solutions they have identified and the role of higher education institutions (HEIs).

Design/methodology/approach

This is the viewpoint of the BAME Apprenticeship Alliance and its Director through engaging with BAME apprentices and collecting a variety of research to show the benefit of recruiting from BAME backgrounds for individuals and organisations. Examples of good practices are included.

Findings

This paper shows there has been an increased effort from UK Government to increase apprenticeship representation from BAME communities. The UK Government has supported the role of apprentices in raising awareness of apprenticeships through recognition of their work.

Research limitations/implications

This research is limited to the last five years from when the first degree apprenticeship was announced in 2015. Its real impact must be measured after a degree apprentice graduates finding what influence this has on job role, salary and subsequently promoting it to prospective apprentices from under-represented communities.

Practical implications

Practical implications include promoting apprentices as role models for the community and engaging with regional and stakeholder networks between HEIs, employers and the Government to share best practice.

Originality/value

Initiatives mentioned within this paper are original to the BAME Apprenticeship Alliance.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1993

Christopher Woodley

Why are people from minority ethnic communities under‐representedin public libraries? Suggests that the poor promotion of librarianshipas a career is a contributive…

426

Abstract

Why are people from minority ethnic communities under‐represented in public libraries? Suggests that the poor promotion of librarianship as a career is a contributive factor: also argues that, even when staff have been recruited – either as an attempt to make an authority′s workforce reflect the local community or through Section 11 for special projects – the prevailing environment militates against staff being retained. Concludes that black staff need a supportive environment, one where indigenous norms and values do not dominate; also suggests that much can be done by senior managers – through “positive action” – to recruit and retain appropriate staff.

Details

Librarian Career Development, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-0810

Keywords

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