Search results

1 – 10 of 23
Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Ian Seymour Yeoman and Una McMahon-Beattie

The primary aim of revenue management (RM) is to sell the right product to the right customer at the right time for the right price. Ever since the deregulation of US…

Abstract

Purpose

The primary aim of revenue management (RM) is to sell the right product to the right customer at the right time for the right price. Ever since the deregulation of US airline industry, and the emergence of the internet as a distribution channel, RM has come of age. The purpose of this paper is to map out ten turning points in the evolution of Revenue Management taking an historical perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a chronological account based upon published research and literature fundamentally drawn from the Journal of Revenue and Pricing Management.

Findings

The significance and success to RM is attributed to the following turning points: Littlewood’s rule, Expected Marginal Seat Revenue, deregulation of the US air industry, single leg to origin and destination RM, the use of family fares, technological advancement, low-cost carriers, dynamic pricing, consumer and price transparency and pricing capabilities in organizations.

Originality/value

The originality of the paper lies in identifying the core trends or turning points that have shaped the development of RM thus assisting futurists or forecasters to shape the future.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 July 2019

Ian Seymour Yeoman and Una McMahon-Beattie

This trends paper is based upon a literature review and access to a series of databases; thus, with the help of these the purpose of this paper is to provide insight into…

Abstract

Purpose

This trends paper is based upon a literature review and access to a series of databases; thus, with the help of these the purpose of this paper is to provide insight into changing consumer behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explores how the experience economy will evolve and outlines the micro and sub-trends that will shape its future.

Findings

This paper identifies seven micro trends associated with the experience economy. The micro trends are: once is never enough, luxury experienced, leisure upgrade, escape from modernity to authenti-seeking, fluid identity, everyday exceptional and experience first.

Originality/value

This trends paper provides useful insights into the experience economy for researchers, practitioners, students or interested parties. Going beyond a broad interpretation, it focuses on specific micro trends in action.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 December 2019

Ian Yeoman and Una McMahon-Beattie

This paper sets out to identify when, how and why tourism has changed from 1946 to 2020 using historical and future turning points.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to identify when, how and why tourism has changed from 1946 to 2020 using historical and future turning points.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the evolutionary paradigm from future studies and the authors’ expertise, this paper aims to provide a focussed review of the history of tourism to identify turning points drawing upon examples from Tourism Review that have transformed or will be of significance in the evolution of tourism.

Findings

This paper identifies three historical turning points which are mobility, Fordism and mass tourism and a modern-day leisure class. Three future turning points are identified including the political importance of tourism, footprint and transformational technologies.

Originality/value

By undertaking a historical analysis of the tourism literature, we can determine that Hobsbawm’s (1995, p. 46) proposition that “the future is a replication of the past” is true, as many of the debates about tourism from the past are relevant today and will be in the future. Thus, this paper identifies six turning points that are of significance to historians and futurists in understanding the evolution of tourism from 1946 to 2095.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 75 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Ian Yeoman, Una McMahon-Beattie and Carol Wheatley

Soft systems methodology (SSM) is well documented in the academic and management literature. Over the last 40 years, the methodology has come to be adapted depending on…

Abstract

Purpose

Soft systems methodology (SSM) is well documented in the academic and management literature. Over the last 40 years, the methodology has come to be adapted depending on the tool users’ skills and experience in order to fit the problem. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate good teaching and learning practice from a pedagogical perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Dr Ian Yeoman of Victoria University of Wellington provides a personal reflection of how the methodology is used in the teaching and learning of TOUR301 Tourism Policy and Planning as a policy and scenario analysis method.

Findings

The paper articulates the seven stages of SSM from problem situation unstructured, through to Rich Pictures, vision and guiding principles, policy solutions, comparisons, feasibility and implementation stages. The paper uses a series of teaching tasks to breakdown the complexity of the methodology thus guiding students and teachers in how to deploy the methodology in the classroom.

Originality/value

The value of the paper demonstrates the reflective practice of SSM in action as an exemplar of good practice. The paper clearly articulates the stages of the methodology so students and teachers can adopt this approach in classroom environments following a scaffolding learning approach. The use of teaching tasks throughout the paper helps bring clarity and order thus enabling the teacher to effectively teach the subject and the students to learn. The most significant contribution of this paper is the articulation of good teaching practice in policy and scenario analysis which articulated through four learning lessons: facilitating a learning environment; the impact of visual thinking; political theory; the importance of incremental learning; and problem-based learning and international students.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Michelle Stella Mars, Ian Seymour Yeoman and Una McMahon-Beattie

Sex tourism is well documented in the literature, but what about porn tourism? Whether it is a Ping Pong show in Phuket or the Banana show in Amsterdam, porn and tourism…

Abstract

Purpose

Sex tourism is well documented in the literature, but what about porn tourism? Whether it is a Ping Pong show in Phuket or the Banana show in Amsterdam, porn and tourism have an encounter and gaze no different from the Mona Lisa in the Louvre or magnificent views of New Zealand’s Southern Alps. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explores the intersections of tourism, porn and the future as a conceptual framework.

Findings

Four intersections are derived from the conceptual framework. Intersection 1, the Future of Tourism, portrays the evolution of tourism and explores its technological future. Interaction 2, Porn in Tourism, distinguishes between soft- and hard-core porn tourism. Intersection 3, Portraying Porn as a Future Dimension, delves into futurism, science fiction and fantasy. The fourth intersection, the Future Gaze, conveys the thrust of the paper by exploring how technological advancement blends with authenticity and reality. Thus the porn tourist seeks both the visual and the visceral pleasures of desire. The paper concludes with four future gazes of porn tourism, The Allure of Porn, The Porn Bubble, Porn as Liminal Experience and Hardcore.

Originality/value

The originality of this paper is that this is the first paper to systematically examine porn tourism beyond sex tourism overlaying with a futures dimension. Porn tourists actively seek to experience both visual and visceral pleasures. Tourism and pornography both begin with the gaze. The gaze is an integral component of futures thinking. Technology is changing us, making us smarter, driving our thirst for liminal experiences. Like the transition from silent movies to talking pictures the porn tourism experience of the future is likely to involve more of the bodily senses.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Ian Yeoman and Una McMahon‐Beattie

Wearable technologies are a near future concept and cyborgs are in fact reality. The authors’ proposition is how cyborgisation could and will occur. The paper aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

Wearable technologies are a near future concept and cyborgs are in fact reality. The authors’ proposition is how cyborgisation could and will occur. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach used by this paper is a general review.

Findings

The authors explain how the line between humans and technology is becoming more and more blurred as this trends paper explores the concepts of singularity and cyborgs as a future state highlighting the world's first cyborg games.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to our understanding that science fiction is fiction to some but reality to others depending on a person's cognition and insight.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Ian Yeoman and Una McMahon‐Beattie

The purpose of this paper is to gain an understanding of why the phenomena of knitting is important in society and an explanation of the underlying currents for tourism.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain an understanding of why the phenomena of knitting is important in society and an explanation of the underlying currents for tourism.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a futurist's observations and reflections.

Findings

Why is knitting making a comeback? Consumers are shutting the door on the world and cocooning thus returning to the world of crafts and hobbies as a way to seek enjoyment. An interest in authenticity and the past as an escape from the present. Single people looking for something to do in an urban world, thus some consumers have turned to knitting. Today, the authors are seeing niche holiday providers offering knitting cruises, knitting escapes and knitting adventures. For New Zealand the home Merrino wool knitting tourism has the potential to be bigger than bungy jumping (some would say).

Originality/value

The trends paper provides an insight of the key trends from a societal perspective of what knitting means and its manifestation as a tourism experience. The value to operators is understanding those trends in context of why the phenomena is occurring.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Dawn Surgenor, Christopher McLaughlin, Una McMahon-Beattie and Amy Burns

The aim of this research is to examine the impact of video-based learning on the cooking skills development of students. More specifically, exploring the first stages in…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this research is to examine the impact of video-based learning on the cooking skills development of students. More specifically, exploring the first stages in the learning process through embedding declarative knowledge utilising both video content and learner profiles, with the purpose to make teaching practice more effectively and efficiently targeted.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative social experimental approach was employed. The sample consisted of 414 students from three post primary schools in Northern Ireland. Students were randomly allocated into both control and experimental video content groups. All participants were made aware of ethical procedures and the nature of the study.

Findings

Through the application of latent class analysis (LCA), three distinct types of students were classified. Class one (n = 250) students were termed independent learners, class two (n = 88) students were motivated and benefited from video-based learning and class three (n = 52) students demonstrated an inability to apply information because video did not assist in embedding declarative knowledge.

Research limitations/implications

Implications from this research inform content generation for video-based cooking skills.

Practical implications

Given the unprecedented move towards online teaching in 2020 due to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) restrictions, there is increasing interest in targeting resources effectively to meet the requirements of all learning groups. This paper fulfils an identified need to study how video impacts on skills development and learning within specific learning typologies.

Originality/value

This research will be of interest to educationalists in promoting a cost-effective resource in line with constructivist values to streamline and meet the needs of individual learners.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 May 2020

Nikki McQuillan, Christine Wightman, Cathy Moore, Una McMahon-Beattie and Heather Farley

Vocational higher education and skills are recognised as key factors in shaping an economy to adapt to fast-emerging business models that disrupt workplace behaviours…

Abstract

Purpose

Vocational higher education and skills are recognised as key factors in shaping an economy to adapt to fast-emerging business models that disrupt workplace behaviours. Employers require graduates to be “work-ready”, emphasising the need to demonstrate resilience, as a critical desired behaviour (CBI, 2019). This case study shares the integrated curriculum design, co-creation and operationalisation of “Graduate Transitions” workshops that were piloted in a compulsory final-year module across a number of programmes in a higher education institutions’ business faculty to enhance graduates “work readiness”.

Design/methodology/approach

The collaboration and leadership thinking of industry professionals, academics and career consultants designed and co-created a workshop that enhances transitioning student resilience and prepares them for their future of work. Action research gathered data using a mixed-methods approach to evaluate student and stakeholder feedback.

Findings

Evidence indicates that the workshops actively embed practical coping strategies for resilience and mindful leaders in transitioning graduates. It assures employers that employability and professional practice competencies are experienced by transitioning graduates entering the future workplace.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations to this research are clearly in the methodology and concentrating on the co-creation of an innovative curriculum design project instead of the tools to accurately evaluate the impact in a systematic manner. There was also limited time and resource to design a more sophisticated platform to collect data and analyse it with the imperative academic rigour required. Emphasis on piloting and operationalisation of the intervention, due to time and resource restrictions, also challenged the methodological design.

Practical implications

The positive feedback from these workshops facilitated integration into the curriculum at an institution-wide level. This paper shares with the academic community of practice, the pedagogy and active learning design that could be customised within their own institution as an intervention to positively influence the new metrics underpinning graduate outcomes.

Originality/value

This pioneering curriculum design ensures that employability and professional practice competencies are experienced by graduates transitioning to the workplace.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Ian Yeoman, Amalina Andrade, Elisante Leguma, Natalie Wolf, Peter Ezra, Rebecca Tan and Una McMahon‐Beattie

The purpose of this paper is to portray the future of tourism in New Zealand based upon a philosophy of sustainability and cultural identity as a response to the present…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to portray the future of tourism in New Zealand based upon a philosophy of sustainability and cultural identity as a response to the present 2025 Tourism Strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

The research deployed a scenario planning methodology resulting in four portraits of the future.

Findings

Environmental issues and global migration are the key issues that will shape the future of New Zealand tourism. In order to address these issues four scenarios were constructed. New Zealand Wonderland portrays a future based upon a grounded international reputation for environmentalism driven by good governance, climate change targets and ecotourism. Indiana Jones and the Search for Cultural Identity position a future driven by rapid growth and unregulated air travel resulting in environmental degradation. A Peaceful Mixture is a balance of socio‐cultural and environmental dimensions of sustainability at the centre of a tourism product shaped upon Maori culture and economic prosperity. The final scenario, New Zealand in Depression, is the worst possible outcome for New Zealand's tourism industry as the three dimensions of economy, community, and environment are not at equilibrium. New Zealand would be over‐polluted with an uncontrolled number of migrants.

Research limitations/implications

The research was a social construction of ten experts’ views on the future of sustainable tourism.

Originality/value

New Zealand's present approach to the future of tourism is shaped by the 2025 Tourism Framework (http://tourism2025.org.nz/). This is derived from a business perspective and a neoliberal political philosophy and it is void of the words ecotourism and sustainability. This paper argues that the present strategy will fail because of community disengagement that proposes a range of alternative directions based upon a political discourse of sustainability and shaped by environmental credentials and cultural identity.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

Keywords

1 – 10 of 23