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Article
Publication date: 24 March 2020

Ulun Akturan

This study aims to examine how green branding strategies affect pay-premium behaviour of consumers for high- vs low-involvement green products in an emerging country.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how green branding strategies affect pay-premium behaviour of consumers for high- vs low-involvement green products in an emerging country.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 500 consumers by survey method, and structural equation modelling was run to analyse the hypotheses.

Findings

Consequently, it was found that for involvement level consumers’ pay-premium behaviour was affected indirectly by perceived quality, and directly by green brand equity and brand credibility. Moreover, in addition to those factors, for low-involvement green products, performance risk and financial risk have an impact on willingness to pay more; however, for high-involvement green products, only performance risk influences the pay more behaviour of consumers.

Research limitations/implications

In the research, two involvement levels and two brands were used. Brand names in particular may have caused a bias in the measurement. And the findings are limited by the sample, which includes respondents from an emerging country.

Practical implications

Managers should focus on green brand equity, brand quality and credibility to support willingness to pay more for green products. Moreover, they should monitor performance risk and financial risk perceptions, which may differ according to the involvement levels.

Originality/value

There is no other study, at least to the best of the author’s knowledge, testing the effects of brand-related factors on consumers’ willingness to pay-premium for green brands.

Details

Journal of Global Responsibility, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2041-2568

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2018

Ulun Akturan

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship among greenwashing, green brand equity, brand credibility, green brand associations and purchase intention.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship among greenwashing, green brand equity, brand credibility, green brand associations and purchase intention.

Design/methodology/approach

As an object to study, two brands were chosen: a high-involved brand and a low-involved brand. Data were collected from 500 consumers by survey method, and structural equation modeling was run to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

As a result, it was found that green brand associations and brand credibility positively affect green brand equity, and green brand equity has a positive and strong impact on purchase intention of consumers. In addition to that greenwashing negatively affects green brand associations and brand credibility, and therefore, indirectly influence green brand equity and purchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

Previous studies conceptualize greenwashing and examine its effects on company performance and skepticism. This study is a first attempt to explore the effects of greenwashing on green branding strategies.

Practical implications

Managers should be aware of that greenwashing not only negatively affects purchase intention but also generates negative outcomes for the relationship with the brands.

Originality/value

There is no other study, at least to the author’s knowledge, testing the effects of greenwashing on green brand perceptions and green purchase intention.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 36 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Ulun Akturan and Nuray Tezcan

This study aims to investigate consumers' mobile banking adoption through an integration of the technology acceptance model (TAM) with work on perceived benefits and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate consumers' mobile banking adoption through an integration of the technology acceptance model (TAM) with work on perceived benefits and perceived risks.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 435 university students who were non‐users but future prospects, and analyzed by structural equation modeling (SEM).

Findings

It was found that perceived usefulness, perceived social risk, perceived performance risk and perceived benefit directly affect attitudes towards mobile banking, and that attitude is the major determinant of mobile banking adoption intention. In addition, no direct relationship between perceived usefulness and intention to use, perceived ease of use and attitude, financial risk, time risk, security/privacy risk and attitude was detected.

Research limitations/implications

This study reflects the perceptions of non‐users and university students – potential future prospects – in an emerging country. The main theoretical contribution of this research is the development of a risk‐benefit model by extending TAM.

Practical implications

Banks should rely on increasing the benefit perceptions of mobile banking. Simultaneously, decreases in social and performance risk should be promoted strongly.

Originality/value

In the study, the adoption intention of mobile banking is tested by integrating TAM with perceived benefits and perceived risks – social risk, performance risk, financial risk, time risk, security risk and privacy risk.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 November 2011

Ulun Akturan, Nuray Tezcan and Alexandra Vignolles

The purpose of this paper is to validate the CSI scale and segment young adults from a developed and a developing country on the basis of their consumption styles as consumers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to validate the CSI scale and segment young adults from a developed and a developing country on the basis of their consumption styles as consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was conducted in France and Turkey. To determine the consumption styles, the CSI scale was used. The data were collected from college students aged 18‐24 by a self‐administered questionnaire. To define the segments, cluster analysis was used. The segments are profiled by young adults' demographic characteristics, attitudes towards shopping influence, and reliance on media.

Findings

In both of the countries, four segments were distinguished and defined as “fashion‐brand conscious consumers”, indifferent consumers”, “recreation seekers” and “quality seekers”.

Research limitations/implications

The study was executed in just one city (Istanbul) in Turkey and one city (Toulouse) in France. The study focused on a single product class, apparel products, since young adults act more as decision makers for that product class.

Practical implications

The expectations and attitudes of the identified segments should be taken into consideration while developing marketing programs by firms.

Originality/value

This study examines a cross‐cultural validation of CSI scale for new country settings and segments young adults. Moreover, this study put forwards a cross‐cultural comparison of young adults' consumption segments.

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2011

Ulun Akturan

The purpose of this paper is to examine celebrity advertising in the case of negative associations.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine celebrity advertising in the case of negative associations.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 451 posts were captured permanently from randomly selected weblogs, and analyzed by discourse analysis. The basic emerging themes therein have been isolated and interpreted, and a model of celebrity endorsement in the case of negative information has been developed.

Findings

When a celebrity becomes involved in an undesirable event, the consumers' perceptions of the celebrity may or may not change. This study argues that this situation is influenced by “the level of negativity”, “the level of blameworthiness”, “admiration” and the “message content”. In addition, it was found that the admiration affects the perceived image of the celebrity and it is also affected by “the level of negativity” and “the level of blameworthiness”. Furthermore, the message given is directly associated with the “negativity”, “blameworthiness”, “perception of the celebrity”, and “the perception of the brand”.

Research limitations/implications

The present study examined only one case of celebrity advertising.

Practical implications

The expectations and attitudes of the identified segments should be taken into consideration when firms develop marketing programs.

Originality/value

This study, unlike others, analyzes the case of the continuance of the endorsement relationship between the company and the negatively publicized celebrity.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 34 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 November 2011

Dr Brian Young

Abstract

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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