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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2011

Helen Sharpe, Peter Musiat, Olivia Knapton and Ulrike Schmidt

Pro‐eating disorder websites are online communities of individuals who do not consider eating disorders to be serious mental illnesses requiring treatment. People visit…

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Abstract

Purpose

Pro‐eating disorder websites are online communities of individuals who do not consider eating disorders to be serious mental illnesses requiring treatment. People visit these websites to meet other like‐minded individuals, to share tips and tricks on how to lose weight and how to otherwise maintain the symptomatology of the disorder. This paper aims to review what is actually known about the risks associated with visiting these websites and provides recommendations for dealing with pro‐eating disorder material.

Design/methodology/approach

Relevant peer‐reviewed papers were located by means of searching three online journal databases (SCOPUS, PubMed, Web of Knowledge), and through carrying out reference checking. Key words for the search were: pro‐anorexia, pro‐ana, pro‐bulimia, pro‐mia and pro‐eating disorders.

Findings

Pro eating disorder websites are common and visited by a significant proportion of patients with eating disorders and non‐patients. The sites may be perceived beneficial, as they provide support and a sense of community. Although there is evidence for the harmfulness of pro‐eating disorder content on the internet, there is no clear indication that such sites promote the development or maintenance of eating disorders. Therefore, banning pro eating disorder websites seems inappropriate and unpractical, but measures for web‐hosting companies should be in place allowing them to remove such content. Instead, bodies creating alternative websites for young people should be supported. Clinicians and parents should be made aware of the existence of pro eating disorder websites and how to deal with them.

Originality/value

This paper provides an overview of the research in this field and discusses possible ways in which health professionals and the general public may respond to the existence of these web sites.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 March 2011

Woody Caan

335

Abstract

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Abstract

Details

The Mindful Tourist: The Power of Presence in Tourism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-637-8

Article
Publication date: 12 November 2021

Ulrike Fasbender, Fabiola H. Gerpott and Dana Unger

Knowledge exchange between older and younger employees enhances the collective memory of an organization and therefore contributes to its business success. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge exchange between older and younger employees enhances the collective memory of an organization and therefore contributes to its business success. The purpose of this paper is to take a motivational perspective to better understand why older and younger employees share and receive knowledge with and from each other. Specifically, this study focuses on generativity striving – the motivation to teach, train and guide others – as well as development striving – the motivation to grow, increase competence and master something new – and argues that both motives need to be considered to fully understand intergenerational knowledge exchange.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper takes a dyadic approach to disentangle how older employees’ knowledge sharing is linked to their younger colleagues’ knowledge receiving and vice versa. The study applied an actor-partner interdependence model based on survey data from 145 age-diverse coworker dyads to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Results showed that older and younger employees’ generativity striving affected their knowledge sharing, which, in turn, predicted their colleagues’ knowledge receiving. Moreover, the study found that younger employees were more likely to receive knowledge that their older colleagues shared with them when they scored higher (vs lower) on development striving.

Originality/value

By studying the age-specific dyadic cross-over between knowledge sharing and knowledge receiving, this research adds to the knowledge exchange literature. This study challenges the current age-blind view on knowledge exchange motivation and provides novel insights into the interplay of motivational forces involved in knowledge exchange between older and younger employees.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 25 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Aging Workforce Handbook
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-448-8

Article
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Ulrike Pröbstl-Haider, Verena Melzer and Alexandra Jiricka

This paper aims to address lack in destination leadership and to propose a new typology of approaches. Frequently, rural tourism is suggested as a remedy that should…

2142

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to address lack in destination leadership and to propose a new typology of approaches. Frequently, rural tourism is suggested as a remedy that should enhance the local economy, create new jobs, strengthen the regional identity and finance the infrastructure.

Design/methodology/approach

Case study analysis shows that regions, communities, tourism organizations and managers use different strategies to strengthen their tourism offers or to develop new ones. The paper analyzes different development approaches among destinations and discusses their respective leadership structure.

Findings

The typology of tourism development models makes the different development options transparent and easy to understand. This may aid a community to support tourism development with spatial planning and avoid conflicts with other forms of land uses. Overall, leadership for rural tourism development should lead to a strategic cooperation between tourism businesses and other organizations based on a commitment to destination coherence.

Research limitations/implications

The chosen research approach is based on the analysis of Central European case studies. Therefore, researchers of other geographical backgrounds are encouraged to test the proposed propositions further.

Practical implications

The presented typology illustrated four distinct options of coherent development strategies, which can support communities/regions to find a long-term decision frame.

Originality/value

The presented typology facilitates collaborative planning, helps operationalize rural tourism development policies and provides the foundation for spatial planning, all of which furthers the linkages between tourism and other sectors in the rural economy.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 69 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Mindful Tourist: The Power of Presence in Tourism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-637-8

Book part
Publication date: 28 December 2016

Kyung-Hyan Yoo and Ulrike Gretzel

To analyze and discuss the role of ICTs and the emerging trends and issues in marketing tourism experiences.

Abstract

Purpose

To analyze and discuss the role of ICTs and the emerging trends and issues in marketing tourism experiences.

Methodology/approach

Previous conceptual frameworks are reviewed and key issues and trends are identified as central for ICT-based tourism marketing. Case studies are presented to illustrate how the marketing issues could be translated into practical tourism marketing strategies.

Findings

(1) Based on the literature, a conceptual model that outlines a technology-empowered marketing approach for co-created tourism experiences is presented. (2) The identified key trends in marketing tourism experiences include the changing overall role of marketers, a growth in mobile marketing opportunities, the emergence of smart destinations and their varied implications for marketing. (3) The case studies show the integrated and strategic role of social media platforms, hashtags, photography, location-based geofilters, augmented reality and videography in marketing tourism experiences.

Originality/value

This chapter conceptually outlines the technology-empowered tourism marketing approach and the role of marketers and various other players in tourism experience co-creation. The case studies provide practical implications for ICT-based tourism marketing.

Details

The Handbook of Managing and Marketing Tourism Experiences
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-289-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2009

Ulrike Ravens‐Sieberer, John Freeman, Gyongyi Kokonyei, Christiane A. Thomas and Michael Erhart

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether students' perceptions of their school environment and their adjustment to school are associated with health outcomes…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether students' perceptions of their school environment and their adjustment to school are associated with health outcomes across gender and age groups.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from the cross‐sectional international Health Behavior in School‐aged Children Survey of the year 2002 (n=162 306) were analyzed. A structural equation model (LISREL) specified social school climate and school demands influencing, school adjustment (achievement and liking of school). The latter aspects were assumed to influence the health outcomes general health item, life satisfaction and multiple psychosomatic symptoms. Analyses were repeated across gender and age (11, 13 and 15 years).

Findings

The specified LISREL model fitted the data well on the entire sample as well as for age and gender subgroups (RMSEA=0.043‐0.054). Overall, girls' general perceived health and life satisfaction seemed to be more strongly affected by the school environment than boys'. Age affected the goodness of fit of the model and reduced the strength of the relationship between school pressure and school adjustment. In all subgroups, the relationship between better school perceptions and better subjective health and life satisfaction were supported by the analyses.

Research limitations/implications

Reported findings are limited to the cross‐sectional study design which precludes causal inferences. Further research using longitudinal data is warranted to confirm the findings.

Practical implications

Relationships between school environment and school adjustment and health‐related outcomes revealed the relative importance of school social climate and demands for school adjustment and through the latter in determining subjective health and life satisfaction. School social climate is a target for promoting health and well‐being of children and adolescents.

Originality/value

Complex statistical analyses employing structural equation modelling confirmed findings on the importance of school aspects for child and adolescents in a huge data set.

Details

Health Education, vol. 109 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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