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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Anna Park, William Ickes and Rebecca L. Robinson

The purpose of this research is to (1) to identify personality variables that reliably predict verbal rudeness ( i.e by replicating previous findings) and (2) to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to (1) to identify personality variables that reliably predict verbal rudeness ( i.e by replicating previous findings) and (2) to investigate what personality variables predict more general ugly confrontational behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

In Study 1, the authors used an online survey to collect information regarding individual differences in social desirability, self-esteem, narcissism, blirtatiousness, behavioral inhibition, behavioral activation, conventional morality (CM), thin-skinned ego defensiveness (TSED), affect intensity for anger and frustration (AIAF), and verbal rudeness. In Study 2, the authors used a similar online survey to collect the same information, but extended the survey questionnaire to include measures of entitlement, psychopathology, Machiavellianism, and a retrospective checklist of ugly confrontational behaviors.

Findings

In Study 1, regression analyses revealed that CM, behavioral inhibition, and behavioral activation reward responsiveness were significant negative predictors of rudeness. AIAF, TSED and behavioral activation drive were significant positive predictors of rudeness. In Study 2, regression analyses revealed that CM was again a significant negative predictor of rudeness. AIAF, and narcissism were significant positive predictors of rudeness. CM also negatively predicted ugly confrontational behaviors, whereas AIAF, blirtatiousness, and Machiavellianism were positive predictors.

Originality/value

Although several measures of aggression exist, the current studies of rudeness and ugly confrontational behavior specifically assess tendencies to abuse strangers. These studies begin to establish a personality profile of the type of person that might abuse strangers.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Anna Park, Rebecca L. Robinson, Meghan J Babcock and William Ickes

The purpose of this paper is to behaviorally validate the Rudeness Scale (RS), a self-report measure of the propensity to verbally abuse strangers, using both a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to behaviorally validate the Rudeness Scale (RS), a self-report measure of the propensity to verbally abuse strangers, using both a retrospective design (Study 1) and a prospective design (Study 2).

Design/methodology/approach

In Study 1, participants (n=280) completed an online survey that contained the RS and a retrospective checklist measure that assessed how often they had engaged in specific confrontational behaviors during the past year. In Study 2 (n=109), participants first completed an online survey that contained the RS and then later completed an experimental session in which they received, and immediately responded to, rude instant messages sent by another “participant.”

Findings

In Study 1, a multiple regression analysis revealed that scores on the RS were positively associated (β=0.39) with scores on the retrospective checklist measure of ugly confrontational behaviors. In Study 2, a multiple regression analysis revealed that scores on the RS were positively associated (β=0.30) with the level of “retaliatory” rude behavior the participants displayed in their instant messaging conversation. Together, these findings reveal that people with high RS scores are more likely, first, to have acted in offensive and confrontational ways in the past (Study 1), and second, to act this way in the present (Study 2).

Originality/value

Although previous studies have provided evidence for the convergent validity of the RS and established a preliminary personality profile of rude individuals, the present studies are the first to explore the behavioral validity of the scale.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2007

Marcus Anthony

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a futures tool developed by Marcus Anthony called Harmonic Circles.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a futures tool developed by Marcus Anthony called Harmonic Circles.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper introduces a new futures tool, using a personal example. There is a description of the tool itself and its purposes. An example from the author's own research is used to demonstrate one potential way of implementing Harmonic Circles. Some appropriate and inappropriate applications of Harmonic Circles are then outlined, as well as possible problems.

Findings

The paper finds that Harmonic Circles can be used by futurists in a number of specific settings, especially to detach from confrontational binaries.

Originality/value

The paper presents a new introspective tool, compatible with critical and postconventional futures.

Details

Foresight, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2018

Vasudev Das

The purpose of this study is to sonographically explore kleptocracy in Nigeria’s nascent democracy and evaluate how democracy can mitigate kleptocratic behavior amongst…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to sonographically explore kleptocracy in Nigeria’s nascent democracy and evaluate how democracy can mitigate kleptocratic behavior amongst Nigerian political elite for a positive social change using sonic therapeutic intervention lens.

Design/methodology/approach

The author inductively generated data through document analysis in this qualitative study.

Findings

The results of the study showed that kleptocracy has been an age-long politico-financial crime in Nigeria. The author proffered sonic therapeutic intervention to simultaneously enhance democratic values and mitigate kleptocracy among the Nigerian leaders.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of the study stemmed from the fact that it cannot be generalized.

Practical implications

The practical implications of the study stemmed from the fact that any leader can take advantage of the research findings and apply the recommendations to themselves for personal transformation without incurring any costs.

Social implications

The social implication of the study is rooted in the fact that if the Nigerian leadership implement the recommendation(s) of the study, there will be a positive social change in the country inasmuch as financial crime will be mitigated.

Originality/value

The originality of the study stemmed from the fact that this inquiry filled the gap in financial crime literature and there was no such study ever conducted in the discipline.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Alexander S. Theodhosi

This article presents the author’s premise that success in business requires a high degree of self‐serving behavior and exclusionary methods on the part of a company’s…

Abstract

This article presents the author’s premise that success in business requires a high degree of self‐serving behavior and exclusionary methods on the part of a company’s leaders. Using numerous examples, including Tom Watson at IBM, Bill Gates at Microsoft, Andy Grove at Intel, Phil Knight at Nike, and Robert Moses in New York City, he shows how both savory and unsavory human behaviors help to accomplish objectives and eventually find their way into commercial settings. Thus, aggressive and manipulative business dealings are a direct result of basic human nature.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

A Meaningful Life at Work
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-767-2

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Book part
Publication date: 19 September 2012

Heather Loyd

Purpose – This chapter presents 5- to 12-year-old girls in their performances of persuasion and social control among peers in their inner city Neapolitan neighborhood of…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter presents 5- to 12-year-old girls in their performances of persuasion and social control among peers in their inner city Neapolitan neighborhood of the Quartieri Spagnoli. It demonstrates how Quartieri Spagnoli girls employ rhetorical practices of appiccecarse (argumentation), specifically “shutdown” attacks, in attempts to advance one's social positioning and present themselves in control of a situation, while contemporaneously creating moral order among peers. In addition, this chapter elucidates how conflict can also strengthen relational bonds through the creation of alliances.

Methodology/approach – The analysis is based on 16 months of linguistic anthropological fieldwork. Seven focal girls and 16 of their female peers were observed and video-recorded in the home and in neighborhood streets.

Findings – Quartieri Spagnoli girls deploy a grammar of social control, including threats, directives, insults, physical attacks, wit, and intonation, to influence each other's behaviors and establish alliances and social hierarchy in their peer groups. This chapter demonstrates how those who demand control present themselves as agents who have power over other subjects and who themselves cannot be acted upon.

Social implications – Girls’ rhetorical skills serve to buy them status and situational power in their peer groups, offsetting feelings of powerlessness in an environment where they are otherwise excluded from mainstream peer groups and society.

Originality/value of chapter – This chapter offers a window onto young girls’ verbal prowess in establishing respect on inner city streets, a topic that has been almost exclusively reserved for males.

Details

Disputes in Everyday Life: Social and Moral Orders of Children and Young People
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-877-9

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2020

Todd J. Bacile

The domain of digital service not only includes digital service products made available for purchase but also the provision of digital customer service, such as customers…

Abstract

Purpose

The domain of digital service not only includes digital service products made available for purchase but also the provision of digital customer service, such as customers seeking support on brands' social media channels. This type of digital customer service introduces new challenges not found in offline service recovery situations. This research highlights one such occurrence by investigating customer-to-customer (C2C) interactions during digital service recovery. In particular, dysfunctional dialog, such as online incivility (e.g. rude and insulting comments), directed at a complainant by a fellow customer is investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data from an online panel are utilized to test the hypothesized relationships between dysfunctional customer behavior (i.e. online incivility), C2C interactional justice, customer perceived service climate and three forms of experiential value using partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM).

Findings

The results show that customer perceptions of the firm's service climate are negatively affected by online incivility but only when such incivility produces C2C injustice. This outcome is notable due to the strong relationship found between customer perceived service climate and the following three forms of online experiential value: sociability, hedonic and pragmatic value. Thus, a weakened service climate subsequently leads to weakened experiential value for complainants.

Research limitations/implications

The theoretical implications of two nascent constructs, C2C interactional justice and customer perceived service climate, are further developed with reference to digital customer service situations. In particular, given that prior research has focused on customer perceptions of service climate in core consumption situations of enjoyable face-to-face service experiences, it has only considered optimal or extremely positive service climate assessments in non-digital contexts. This study expands the understanding of the customer perceived service climate construct by examining the implications of a sub-optimal service climate in a digital customer service situation of an unenjoyable service experience. The limitations include a small sample size, the use of hypothetical scenarios and a failure situation limited to a single industry.

Practical implications

Managers who oversee social media channels or online communities must be prepared to act upon C2C online incivility. Deeming such communications as innocent online chatter not worthy of company intervention is a mistake, as the results of this study show that such inaction may lead to negative customer perceptions of the digital service environment and harm the customer experience.

Originality/value

This work develops a greater understanding of the importance of C2C interactional justice and customer perceived service climate in online customer service situations that prior research has yet to establish. In particular, previous studies have not investigated the negative effects of a situation that produces sub-optimal customer perceptions of a service climate.

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Cornel Gusan and Brian H. Kleiner

Considers the growth and development of the temporary worker within the workforce and looks at the advantages and disadvantages this brings. Cites common characteristics…

Abstract

Considers the growth and development of the temporary worker within the workforce and looks at the advantages and disadvantages this brings. Cites common characteristics found in this area and provides a brief case study. Covers the legal implications and the importance of employee classification under Equal Employment Opportunity Commission guidelines. Briefly outlines new developments in this area.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 19 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2018

Hans Vermaak and Léon de Caluwé

The colors of change is an overview of change paradigms, created about two decades ago, that has been intensively used, tested, refined, shared, and elaborated by…

Abstract

The colors of change is an overview of change paradigms, created about two decades ago, that has been intensively used, tested, refined, shared, and elaborated by practitioners and academics alike. Here, the “color theory” is presented as it is now, and is situated within the literature. Its four main applications are described as well as rules of thumb that have been derived from reflective practice. This chapter illustrates that the color theory is clearly not one thing to all people, as it is understood in very different ways, both in terms of its theoretical foundations as well as the complexity of its applications. This probably adds to the versatility of the theory. Bringing together key insights about the color theory for academics and practitioners, this chapter strives both to give a concise overview and to explore its richness.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-351-3

Keywords

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