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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2020

G.P.P.S. Perera, T.M.M.P. Tennakoon, Udayangani Kulatunga, Himal Suranga Jayasena and M.K.C.S. Wijewickrama

The purpose of this paper is to select a suitable procurement method for steel building construction in Sri Lanka following a systematic method which weigh, both…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to select a suitable procurement method for steel building construction in Sri Lanka following a systematic method which weigh, both procurement selection factors and existing procurement systems.

Design/methodology/approach

An abductive research stance is followed in this empirical study. Procurement selection factors were selected through a critical literature review which was followed by a quantitative questionnaire survey. The collected data were analysed using descriptive statistical analysis and relative important index.

Findings

The critical literature review outlined 46 procurement selection factors, out of which 26 factors were very important in steel building procurement selection. Short construction period and higher constructability of design are ranked at the top with the highest priority rating factors. Management-oriented procurement system was selected as the most appropriate procurement system for steel building constructions within the Sri Lankan context.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to widely use three procurement systems in Sri Lankan construction industry. Yet, the process followed in selecting the most appropriate procurement system could be applied for other contexts. The implications of the study are mainly identifying management-oriented procurement as the most suitable procurement method for steel building construction in Sri Lanka.

Practical implications

The systematic procedure of procurement method selection for steel building construction may use in the Sri Lankan construction industry to limit the resource loss due to wrong selection of procurement.

Originality/value

A study which critically and comprehensively presenting a procurement selection process for steel building construction is not recorded in Sri Lanka prior to this study.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

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Article
Publication date: 19 November 2018

Temitope Seun Omotayo, Udayangani Kulatunga and Bassam Bjeirmi

Kaizen in construction is a new paradigm stemming out of lean production systems. Construction companies in developing economies, such as Nigeria, have a task to innovate…

Abstract

Purpose

Kaizen in construction is a new paradigm stemming out of lean production systems. Construction companies in developing economies, such as Nigeria, have a task to innovate to liquidate in certain cases. With the aid of kaizen, which encompasses the benefit of stakeholder relationship improvement and management, profitability enhancement and delivery of projects to satisfied clients, construction companies can realise expected growth. An exploration of the critical success factors (CSF) and associated drivers within the limits of the scope is essential. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Exploratory factor analysis statistical tests categorised the CSF identified in the literature review section. A detailed sampling approach extracted 135 questionnaires under the five-point Likert scale format from a larger population in Nigeria. An exploration of important drivers and iteration of eigenvalues combined with asymptotic significance of the drivers provided the CSF and significant drivers.

Findings

Construction management function, operational efficiency, construction business ethics and construction cost management were the CSF established from the exploratory factor analysis tests. It was confirmed that kaizen can be adopted in Nigerian construction companies with reflections on the principal drivers for the CSF.

Research limitations/implications

The exploration of the CSF and drivers associated with kaizen implementation can be applied to other developing countries with considerations of implementation in terms of cost and time.

Originality/value

The identification of CSF provides ample opportunity for consideration of kaizen in construction companies. The findings of this study are a basis for investigations into cost and time implications of kaizen adoption in construction companies.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 67 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Udayangani Kulatunga and Bingunath Ingirige

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Abstract

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Gayan Wedawatta, Udayangani Kulatunga, Dilanthi Amaratunga and Ahmed Parvez

Development of effective disaster risk reduction (DRR) strategies for communities at risk of being affected by natural disasters is considered essential, especially in the…

Abstract

Purpose

Development of effective disaster risk reduction (DRR) strategies for communities at risk of being affected by natural disasters is considered essential, especially in the wake of devastating disaster events reported worldwide. As part of a wider research study investigating community perspectives on existing and potential strategies for enhancing resilience to natural disasters, community perspectives on infrastructure and structural protection requirements were investigated. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Patuakhali region in South-Western Bangladesh is a region significantly at risk of multiple natural hazards. In order to engage local communities and obtain their perspectives, focus group discussions were held with local community leaders and policy makers of at-risk communities in Patuakhali region, South-Western Bangladesh.

Findings

Infrastructure and structural protection requirements highlighted included multi-purpose cyclone shelters, permanent embankments and improved transport infrastructure. Much of the discussions of focus group interviews were focused on cyclone shelters and embankments, suggesting their critical importance in reducing disaster risk and also dependence of coastal communities on those two measures.

Originality/value

The research design adopted sought to answer the research questions raised and also to inform local policy makers on community perspectives. Local policy makers involved in DRR initiatives in the region were informed of community perspectives and requirements, thus contributing to community engagement in implementing DRR activities.

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2021

T.M.M.P. Tennakoon, Udayangani Kulatunga and Himal Suranga Jayasena

The purpose of this study is to comprehend the influence of the organisational culture on knowledge management (KM) in an automated construction environment.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to comprehend the influence of the organisational culture on knowledge management (KM) in an automated construction environment.

Design/methodology/approach

An abductive research approach is used, constantly matching theories and observations on KM and organisational culture in testing the influence within a building information modelling (BIM)-enabled environment. A questionnaire survey is used for the primary data collection. Simultaneously, expert interviews are conducted to find the rationale through triangulating data. The primary data analysis is conducted through relative importance index (RII) calculation and content analysis.

Findings

The analysis has declared an increment in the level of influence of culture on KM in a BIM-enabled environment when compared to the conventional construction environment. Coordination and integration, strategic direction and intend and organisational learning are the leading cultural factors that have an increased influence on KM with RII values of 0.8730, 0.8540 and 0.8222, respectively. Because BIM is a technology-infused solution in the construction industry, it can be concluded that technical implementations positively shape the organisational culture to improve the KM process.

Research limitations/implications

The data collection and findings of this research paper regarding the influence of organisational culture on KM are limited to scenarios in the construction industry. Yet, these findings could be implied to similar industries as well, when the KM process is under question.

Originality/value

The study provides the perception of knowledge in terms of the technological implementations such as BIM and organisational culture in the construction industry.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Muhammad Imran Zin Zawawi, Udayangani Kulatunga and Menaha Thayaparan

Lack of competition in procurement processes may affect the sustainable procurement due to overpriced and low-quality infrastructure. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Lack of competition in procurement processes may affect the sustainable procurement due to overpriced and low-quality infrastructure. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the current practices in Malaysian public-private partnership (PPP) in handling unsolicited proposals within PPP and to suggest ways in which the practices can be improved to achieve sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

Case study was conducted within which 13 semi-structured interviews were carried out with different groups: the policy makers, the practitioners and the experts. The study also scrutinised published guidelines and relevant regulations used by in management of unsolicited proposals in Malaysian PPP.

Findings

The Government of Malaysia welcomes unsolicited proposals from the private sector, even though it does not publish any established mechanisms to handle such proposals. Lack of competition in unsolicited proposals is a major concern in achieving sustainable goals of procurement. This could be addressed by introducing a competitive element to unsolicited proposals.

Originality/value

There are limited study and reports on the implementation of unsolicited proposals by the Malaysian Government. Besides adding to the literature, this paper reveals the management of unsolicited proposals. Most importantly, it is useful in assisting potential Malaysian PPP stakeholders and investors in what to expect, based on findings from the actual practice.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Facilities, vol. 28 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Udayangani Kulatunga, Dilanthi Amaratunga, Richard Haigh and Raufdeen Rameezdeen

The construction industry consumes large amounts of natural resources, which are not properly utilised owing to the generation of waste. Construction waste has challenged…

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5519

Abstract

Purpose

The construction industry consumes large amounts of natural resources, which are not properly utilised owing to the generation of waste. Construction waste has challenged the performance of the industry and its sustainable goals. The majority of the causes underlying material waste are directly or indirectly affected by the behaviour of the construction workforce. Waste occurs on site for a number of reasons, most of which can be prevented, particularly by changing the attitudes of the construction workforce. Therefore, the attitudes and perceptions of the construction workforce can influence the generation and implementation of waste management strategies. The research reported in this paper is based on a study aimed at evaluating the attitudes and perceptions of the construction workforce involved during the pre‐ and post‐contract stages towards minimising waste.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured questionnaire survey was carried out to understand and evaluate the attitudes and perceptions of the workforce. Four types of questionnaires were prepared for project managers/site managers, supervisors, labourers, and estimators.

Findings

The findings indicate the positive perceptions and attitudes of the construction workforce towards minimising waste and conserving natural resources. However, a lack of effort in practising these positive attitudes and perceptions towards waste minimisation is identified. The paper further concludes that negative attitudes towards subordinates, attitudinal differences between different working groups, and a lack of training to reinforce the importance of waste minimisation practices have obstructed proper waste management practices in the industry.

Originality/value

The paper reveals the effect of the attitudes and perceptions of the construction workforce towards waste management applications, which would be of benefit to construction managers in designing and implementing better waste management practices.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2011

Udayangani Kulatunga, Dilanthi Amaratunga and Richard Haigh

The aim of this study is to explore performance measurement applications within construction research and development (R&D) to develop a structured approach to measure the…

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3230

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to explore performance measurement applications within construction research and development (R&D) to develop a structured approach to measure the performance of a collaborative construction R&D project during its lifecycle from initiation, conceptualisation, development, and launch stages, and during project management.

Design/methodology/approach

During the exploratory phase of the study, semi‐structured interviews and a questionnaire survey were carried out to develop the performance measurement system (PMS). During the explanatory phase, the developed PMS was refined with a series of semi‐structured interviews. The data were gathered from principal investigators, researchers and industrial partners involved in collaborative construction R&D work.

Findings

The main finding is the developed PMS to measure the performance of construction R&D that consists of critical success factors, performance indicators and performance measures during the lifecycle of a R&D project.

Practical implications

The PMS developed through the study provides critical success factors, performance indicators and measures that need to be considered during construction R&D projects to measure the performance. Thus, through the implementation of the PMS, this study contributes to practice by assisting the performance improvement within construction R&D projects.

Originality/value

The developed PMS to measure the performance of construction R&D projects will provide value for those who are engaged in R&D work (principal investigators, researchers and industrial partners) to ensure the success of their projects.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 60 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2011

Kushan Kulatunga, Udayangani Kulatunga, Dilanthi Amaratunga and Richard Haigh

Clients or users of products, processes or services are currently being identified as potential sources of innovation in construction. There are concerns about the degree…

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2073

Abstract

Purpose

Clients or users of products, processes or services are currently being identified as potential sources of innovation in construction. There are concerns about the degree of innovation within the construction industry, despite having potential to be innovative. The role that can be played by the construction client to promote innovation in the industry is well documented. However, lack of knowledge on the desirable characteristics of the construction client was identified as one of the barriers for the construction client to be an effective innovation promoter. Accordingly, the purpose of this paper is to evaluate the characteristics of the construction client that promote innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple holistic case studies were used as the research strategy and semi‐structured interviews were used as the principal data collection technique. Code‐based content analysis and cognitive mapping were used to analyse the interviews. Data analysis was supported by two computer‐aided softwares, NVivo and Decision Explorer.

Findings

Clients can increase the efficiency of work carried out towards the construction process, stimulate team dynamics, and team action through the championing characteristics, which in turn can strengthen the innovation process that lead to the innovative product. Being a team player, promoting respect for people, and knowledge and information dissemination are identified as constituents of the championing characteristics of clients that promote innovation in construction projects. The personal skills of clients such as competence, value judgement, flexibility, and self‐motivation will energise the success of the championing characteristics.

Originality/value

The client characteristics identified from the study widen the knowledge base of the client to successfully engage in construction innovation.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

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