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Article
Publication date: 21 December 2020

Andrew Fyfe and Norman Hutchison

This article aims to understand the housing needs of older people and to ascertain the level of demand and supply of age-related housing in Scotland. It also explores…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to understand the housing needs of older people and to ascertain the level of demand and supply of age-related housing in Scotland. It also explores interest in different types of retirement accommodation and tenure options.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of existing literature is undertaken on senior housing preferences and residential satisfaction. Primary data is collected from an online survey of people over 55 in Scotland to ascertain demand side requirements with secondary data on current supply obtained from the Elderly Accommodation Counsel and data on future pipeline collated from market reports.

Findings

The results from the survey confirm earlier research that seniors when looking for accommodation in their retirement years particularly focus on the local area, access to shops, social relations with neighbours and the design of the home interior. Current analysis of the level of supply at a county level reveals that there is significant undersupply with some particularly striking regional differences. Along with a desire for owner occupation there is interest, particularly among the 75 plus age group, to lease their accommodation, perhaps a consequence of volatile property markets, insufficient pension provision or a desire to pass wealth to their family prior to death. This shortfall in supply highlights development opportunities and raises the possibility of introducing a build-to-rent senior housing offering, which may be of interest to institutional investors.

Practical implications

The Scottish Government is currently reviewing its strategy for Scotland's older people. The results are of practical benefit as they expose the gaps in supply of age-related stock at county level. This may require the government to introduce policy measures to encourage a mix of housing types suited for the ageing demographics of the population. This research highlights opportunities for developers and investors to fill that gap and explains why advancements in technology should be incorporated in the design process.

Originality/value

This paper brings together supply side data of senior housing in Scotland and provides insights into the housing preferences of seniors. It will be of direct value and interest to developers and institutional investors.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Lisa C. Wilson, Andrew Alexander and Margaret Lumbers

Decentralisation of many food retailers to edge‐of‐town and out‐of‐town locations has resulted in some older people experiencing difficulty in accessing food shops and…

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Abstract

Decentralisation of many food retailers to edge‐of‐town and out‐of‐town locations has resulted in some older people experiencing difficulty in accessing food shops and those experiencing the greatest difficulties in food shopping are considered to be at the greatest nutritional risk. The present study examines how and to what extent usage of, and physical access to food shops might influence dietary variety. Shopping behaviour and dietary variety are investigated using focus groups, a consumer questionnaire and a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). A dietary variety score system, developed from the FFQ, is employed in this study. Neither usage of (particular) food shops nor basic accessibility variables are found to have a direct effect on dietary variety. Yet, coping strategies employed by older consumers to obtain food are revealed to be important. This suggests that more complex access factors remain an important issue for study in relation to the shopping experience of a proportion of the older population.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Jonathan Scrutton, David Sinclair and Trinley Walker

– The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how access to vaccination for older people in the UK can be both improved and used as a tool for healthy ageing.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how access to vaccination for older people in the UK can be both improved and used as a tool for healthy ageing.

Design/methodology/approach

ILC-UK released a report “Adult Immunisation in the UK”, which applied a UK perspective to a 2013 Supporting Active Ageing Through Immunisation (SAATI) report on immunisation. The ILC report combined the SAATI findings with a traditional literature review, a policy review incorporating grey literature and the outcomes of a focus group discussion. This paper highlights the key findings of the ILC-UK report.

Findings

Vaccination needs to be included as part of proactive strategies to promote healthy and active ageing. Initiatives need to be explored that increase the rate of delivery of vaccinations. Barriers to the vaccination of health and social care professionals working with older people need to be removed. The government should explore using psychological insights into human behaviour to improve the take-up of vaccinations amongst adults. The range of settings where older people can receive vaccination needs to be expanded. Information on the potential benefits of immunisation should be made readily available and easily accessible to older people.

Practical implications

The paper calls for a structural shift in how vaccination services in the UK are organised.

Social implications

The paper calls for a cultural shift in how society views immunisation and the role it has to play in the healthy ageing process.

Originality/value

The paper uses new European research on immunisation and applies it to the UK's situation.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 December 2011

Toby Williamson

This paper seeks to provide an overview of key issues involved in older men's mental health and well being and describes a service improvement project called Grouchy Old

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to provide an overview of key issues involved in older men's mental health and well being and describes a service improvement project called Grouchy Old Men? that focused on older men who were isolated and at risk of depression and suicide.

Design/methodology/approach

Grouchy Old Men? was a two‐year project that used a “change agent” model of organisational development, which aimed to improve the mental health and well being of older men through gathering and disseminating examples of good practice and piloting a training module to raise awareness about the mental health of older men.

Findings

The project was successful in supporting and promoting a number of local initiatives and organisations, as well as a national network, seeking to develop services to better meet the needs of this group, as well as raising awareness more generally about older men's mental health.

Practical implications

The paper suggests ways that services for older people can develop in order to make themselves more accessible to older men with mental health needs.

Originality/value

The paper brings together policy, research, and practical service improvement initiatives that will be of interest and relevance to policy makers, practitioners, and anyone with an interest in the mental health of older men.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2011

Christopher Deeming

Peter Townsend is one of the greatest social scientists of the twentieth century and best known for his pioneering research into poverty. This paper aims to revisit…

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Abstract

Purpose

Peter Townsend is one of the greatest social scientists of the twentieth century and best known for his pioneering research into poverty. This paper aims to revisit Townsend's early work discussing the measurement of poverty and attempts to operationalise his ideas for determining minimum income standards for healthy living.

Design/methodology/approach

The article is based upon a secondary analysis of data taken from the UK Expenditure and Food Survey, a continuous cross‐sectional survey of household income, expenditure, and food consumption. Here, the sample has been restricted to an older population and the authors observe the relationship between household income and a healthy standard of living (indicated by diet) for people aged 60 years and over.

Findings

Minimum income requirements for healthy living, for this population in the UK, are 37 per cent greater than the British state pension for single pensioners and 37 per cent for pensioner couples. It is also appreciably greater than the official minimum income safety net (after means testing), the pension credit guarantee.

Practical implications

Objective evidence‐based assessment of living standards are practicable but do not presently provide a basis for social policy in the UK or elsewhere apparently. Such assessment could provide a credible basis for helping to establish minimum income standards in official policy.

Originality/value

Recent developments in the design of a British social survey have made it possible to operationalise Townsend's ideas for establishing minimum income standards over half a century after he proposed them.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 31 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 February 2021

Jill Manthorpe and Jo Moriarty

The COVID-19 pandemic has shone a light on long-standing, structural race inequality in Britain. This paper aims to review historic patterns of ethnic diversity among the…

Abstract

Purpose

The COVID-19 pandemic has shone a light on long-standing, structural race inequality in Britain. This paper aims to review historic patterns of ethnic diversity among the workforce employed in services for older people to present some of the lessons that can be learned from the pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

A historical overview was undertaken of research about ethnic diversity in the social care workforce.

Findings

Too often, the ethnic diversity of the social care workforce has been taken as evidence that structural racial inequalities do not exist. Early evidence about the impact of coronavirus on workers from black and minority ethnic groups has led to initiatives aimed at reducing risk among social care employers in the independent sector and in local government. This offers a blueprint for further initiatives aimed at reducing ethnic inequalities and promoting ethnic diversity among the workforce supporting older people.

Research limitations/implications

The increasing ethnic diversity of the older population and the UK labour force highlights the importance of efforts to address what is effective in reducing ethnic inequalities and what works in improving ethnic diversity within the social care workforce and among those using social care services for older people.

Originality/value

The ethnic makeup of the workforce reflects a complex reality based on multiple factors, including historical patterns of migration and gender and ethnic inequalities in the UK labour market.

Details

Working with Older People, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-3666

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Raphael Malek

– The issues of concern to older people and likely to shape their voting behaviour need to be understood and appreciated. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Abstract

Purpose

The issues of concern to older people and likely to shape their voting behaviour need to be understood and appreciated. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This policy-oriented review draws on recent research, including surveys, focus groups and ethnographic interviews to identify such issues in the UK older population.

Findings

Older people are more likely to vote and to prioritise policy issues relating to immigration, the NHS and the economy–but the outcome of their vote is more likely to be determined by affinity with a party’s broader ideological position than with the specific policies contained in their manifesto?.

Practical implications

Older people appear more likely to support Conservative party values and priorities, but their potential growing support for UKIP may be underestimated as several major surveys do not prompt for this party. The less certain standing of both Conservative and Labour may therefore be further undermined by unappreciated shifts in the “grey vote”.

Originality/value

This commentary highlights the increasing importance of the “grey vote” at a time of increasing unpredictability in support for mainstream parties.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 August 2020

Jose Iparraguirre

This paper aims to whether current public expenditure on adult social care services might be associated with the number of delayed days of care attributable to the social…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to whether current public expenditure on adult social care services might be associated with the number of delayed days of care attributable to the social care system in England.

Design/methodology/approach

Panel econometric models on data from local authorities with adult social care responsibilities in England between 2013–2014 and 2018–2019.

Findings

After controlling for other organisational sources of inefficiency, the level of demand in the area and the income poverty amongst the resident older population, this paper finds that a 4.5% reduction in current spending per head on adult social care per older person in one year is associated with an increase by 0.01 delayed days per head the following year.

Social implications

Given the costs of adverse outcomes of delayed transfers of care reported in the literature, this paper suggests that budgetary constraints to adult social care services would represent a false economy of public funds.

Originality/value

This is the first paper that models the association between public spending on adult social care and delayed transfers of care due to issues originating in the social care system in England.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 15 June 2021

Ian Davies-Abbott, Catrin Hedd Jones and Gill Windle

This paper aims to understand the lived experience of a person living with dementia in a care home during the COVID-19 pandemic. It responds to the absence in research of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to understand the lived experience of a person living with dementia in a care home during the COVID-19 pandemic. It responds to the absence in research of the voices of people with dementia living in care homes during the pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a single case study design applied thematic analysis to semi-structured interview data to discover the experiences of one person living with dementia in a care home during a period of lockdown.

Findings

Five themes reveal how the participant responded to the practical and emotional challenges of the pandemic: autonomy; fears; keeping connected; keeping safe and other people living with dementia. These themes highlight the participant’s ability to adapt, accept and dispute lockdown restrictions, revealing considerable insight into their situation.

Research limitations/implications

The pandemic has restricted access to care homes, which informed the single case study design. This approach to the research may restrict the generalisability of the findings. Other researchers are encouraged to include the voices of people with dementia living in care homes in further studies.

Practical implications

Implications for practice, presented in this paper, promote quality psychosocial approaches when health-care workers engage with people living with dementia during periods of restricted activity.

Originality/value

Unlike other studies about the impact of the pandemic on care homes, this paper explores the experience of the pandemic in care homes from the perspective of a person living with dementia.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 22 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 January 2022

Michelle Louise Gatt, Maria Cassar and Sandra C. Buttigieg

The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyse the readmission risk prediction tools reported in the literature and their benefits when it comes to healthcare…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyse the readmission risk prediction tools reported in the literature and their benefits when it comes to healthcare organisations and management.

Design/methodology/approach

Readmission risk prediction is a growing topic of interest with the aim of identifying patients in particular those suffering from chronic diseases such as congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and diabetes, who are at risk of readmission. Several models have been developed with different levels of predictive ability. A structured and extensive literature search of several databases was conducted using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis strategy, and this yielded a total of 48,984 records.

Findings

Forty-three articles were selected for full-text and extensive review after following the screening process and according to the eligibility criteria. About 34 unique readmission risk prediction models were identified, in which their predictive ability ranged from poor to good (c statistic 0.5–0.86). Readmission rates ranged between 3.1 and 74.1% depending on the risk category. This review shows that readmission risk prediction is a complex process and is still relatively new as a concept and poorly understood. It confirms that readmission prediction models hold significant accuracy at identifying patients at higher risk for such an event within specific context.

Research limitations/implications

Since most prediction models were developed for specific populations, conditions or hospital settings, the generalisability and transferability of the predictions across wider or other contexts may be difficult to achieve. Therefore, the value of prediction models remains limited to hospital management. Future research is indicated in this regard.

Originality/value

This review is the first to cover readmission risk prediction tools that have been published in the literature since 2011, thereby providing an assessment of the relevance of this crucial KPI to health organisations and managers.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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