Search results

1 – 10 of 199
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 4 October 2012

Holly Buckland Parker

Larger numbers of students are entering higher education with more diverse learning needs. While laws are in place to create equal access to education for all…

Abstract

Larger numbers of students are entering higher education with more diverse learning needs. While laws are in place to create equal access to education for all, government-mandated learning supports for students with documented disabilities vary significantly from K-12 education to higher education. Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is a course design framework based on Universal Design in architecture, neuroscience research, and the latest technology, to design learning environments and curriculums that are accessible to all students in every learning environment. This chapter reviews literature on the history of Universal Design concepts, starting with Universal Design in architecture and moving into UDL. A review of the learning preferences of Millennial students, along with the neuroscience of learning and its connection to the principles of UDL, is also included in the literature review. This chapter also includes a section on Dr. Buckland Parker's study which documents four faculty members who chose to work with a small team of faculty development specialists to redesign their large enrollment courses using the principles of Universal Design for Learning.

Details

Transforming Learning Environments: Strategies to Shape the Next Generation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-015-4

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 November 2011

Marcin Davies, François Carrez, Juhani Heinilä, Anna Fensel, Maribel Narganes and José Carlos dos Santos Danado

Mobile computing enables end‐users to create small services on their mobiles and share valuable and context‐aware information with others. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Mobile computing enables end‐users to create small services on their mobiles and share valuable and context‐aware information with others. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a platform for end‐user generated mobile services – so‐called microservices.

Design/methodology/approach

As a key component the authors present a microservice description language for user‐driven mobile service creation and platform‐independent service execution and rendering. The paper also gives insight into the authors' visual authoring tool. The chosen design approach is evaluated in two phases: an intermediate evaluation with a small hands‐on trial and an online survey; and a final laboratory test with 24 test users in total.

Findings

The paper provides empirical insights about the methods and motivations of end‐users creating small mobile services. The main purposes of service creation would be mostly to exchange information, stay in contact, and just for fun (on the basis of non‐commercial use). The evaluations also indicate the visual drag and drop approach of putting service blocks together as being the most favored in terms of user satisfaction.

Originality/value

The concepts and findings introduced in this paper will help in designing mobile service authoring environments, which is appealing to software communities/vendors and mobile network operators. The presented platform is, to the authors' knowledge, the first designed and implemented infrastructure enabling end‐user mobile service creation.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 3 November 2017

Jodi Louise Pilgrim and Angela Kris Ward

The purpose of this chapter is to describe the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework and explore ways UDL decreases potential barriers for diverse students while…

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to describe the Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework and explore ways UDL decreases potential barriers for diverse students while increasing opportunities to learn. The sociocultural theory of Lev Vygotsky (1978) serves as a theoretical framework for UDL. Vygotsky (1978) placed much emphasis on the role of the social interaction in the development of cognition stating, “Every function in the child’s cultural development appears twice: first, on the social level, and later, on the individual level” (Vygotsky, 1978, p. 57). Additionally, he focused considerable attention on language and private speech. The ability to express oneself in any environment, particularly the classroom, is critical to intellectual development. Another pivotal concept is that of the Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD), which reflects the point between what a child has previously learned and can complete independently and that which they cannot do, even with supports. Our intent was to use student examples, or case studies, of typical diversity in the classroom, to demonstrate the application of UDL principles. Specifically, we provide ways planning for representation of material, expression of material, and engagement in material, which can benefit all learners. The case study examples demonstrate ways effective planning can benefit learners in many areas. The case studies presented in this chapter reflect a small portion of the diverse population in classrooms across the nation. Yet the case studies demonstrate ways planning can incorporate students “in the margin” while at the same time benefitting all students in the classroom. Addressing diversity through the UDL lens helps teachers accommodate individual differences through intentional instructional design, while at the same time providing resources for all students in the classroom.

Details

Addressing Diversity in Literacy Instruction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-048-6

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 January 2010

Sarah Bryans Bongey, Gerald Cizadlo and Lynn Kalnbach

The purpose of this paper is to plan, implement, and deliver universal design for learning (UDL) benefits to a large class of undergraduate biology students.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to plan, implement, and deliver universal design for learning (UDL) benefits to a large class of undergraduate biology students.

Design/methodology/approach

This pilot project used an online course site in the course management system (CMS) to establish a universal design (UD) and maintain it throughout a semester‐long class in undergraduate biology. Although the class is traditionally taught in a face‐to‐face lecture and lab format, this intervention is used to expand the representational, strategic, and affective aspects of the course.

Findings

Survey results and follow‐up interviews as well as student usage statistics and points earned on tests are collected and analysed, with the resulting data used to generate conclusions relating to the benefits of a UDL‐compliant supplemental site versus a supplemental site that does not apply UDL principles. While the students perceived‐added value in the UDL‐enhanced site, the overall intervention does not lead to improved grades leading to the possibility that there may be a “sweet spot” or optimal blend of tools and approaches.

Research limitations/implications

Further research will be needed in order to establish a more reliable mode of using supplemental online course sites to deliver UDL. Specifically, it will be important to expand this pilot case to a wider range of courses including those that include more diverse populations of students.

Practical implications

The CMS represents a potential means of delivering UD benefits in an optimal and replicable manner. It will be important to expand this pilot effort to identify an optimal balance of supports and also to increase its generalizability by including a wider range of courses, as well as those that include more diverse populations of students.

Originality/value

This paper uses a potentially replicable strategy to deliver the benefits of UD to college students. If an optimal balance of supports can be identified, this supplemental use of an online course site in the CMS could serve to deliver academic and student satisfaction benefits to a wide range of students, including those in the K‐12 setting.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 December 2019

Sophie Brinsmead

The purpose of this paper is to consider the accessibility of Apple’s iPad. The discussion focusses on the accessibility of this technology to children and young people…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the accessibility of Apple’s iPad. The discussion focusses on the accessibility of this technology to children and young people with cerebral palsy (CP), reviewing a range of literature. Terms including “inclusion” are debated alongside the practicalities associated with implementing assistive technologies in educational settings. The benefits of technology for those with CP are explored, with examples including augmentative and alternative communication systems. The current suitability of the iPad for children and young people with CP is discussed, alongside ways in which eye-gaze technology may be employed to increase inclusivity.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a consideration of multiple methods for evaluating the inclusivity of mainstream technologies. It is contended that the universal design for learning (UDL) principles are likely to be the most appropriate, due to their applicability to educational settings. Furthermore, the UDL principles acknowledge the heterogeneity of those with CP, and this is suggested to be useful due to its ability to be integrated alongside some of the principles of assistive technology.

Findings

The discussion contends that Apple’s iPad may be redesigned in order to meet the needs of users with CP. Eye-gaze technology is suggested as one way to include this group of users, due to the altered interface interaction. Despite some challenges with the eye-gaze technology, the paper suggests that this alteration to the iPad may result in increased accessibility not only for those with CP, but also others with fine motor difficulties. It is concluded that the integration of eye-gaze technology with Apple’s iPad may be a potential avenue for future investigation.

Practical implications

By altering the interface interaction on Apple’s iPad, the device may be more accessible to users with fine motor difficulties, such as those with CP. It is suggested that the paper may inspire future research concerning the practicalities of integrating eye-gaze technology on a small, portable device.

Social implications

Those who are of lower socioeconomic status are less likely to have access to assistive technologies; the cost of Apple’s devices is relatively higher than those produced by other technology companies, confining their availability to wealthier consumers. This may also lead to a divide in inclusive technical capital (Hayhoe, 2015), whereby wealthier users may have an increased potential to access inclusive assistive technologies and thus increase their capital.

Originality/value

The paper integrates a discussion of the UDL principles with their application to both assistive technologies and educational settings. It is speculated that this paper may be valuable to those researching in the field of assistive technologies, who may build upon the present discussion with a research study. It is also anticipated that the consideration of the use of the iPad for children and young people with CP may be of use to those working in education who wish to integrate technology into the education of those with a range of special educational needs.

Details

Journal of Enabling Technologies, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6263

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Libraries and Reading
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-385-3

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2015

Randall Boone and Kyle Higgins

Accessibility design over the past several years has focused much of its attention on the development of a universal standard or a set of guidelines for delivering a…

Abstract

Accessibility design over the past several years has focused much of its attention on the development of a universal standard or a set of guidelines for delivering a diverse array of both content and instructional processes. Universal design for learning (UDL), for example, promotes providing multiple means of (a) representation, (b) action and expression, and (c) engagement for learners who have a wide range of disabilities as well as their typical peers. And while each instructional design element that represents a means of providing the differentiation required by the principle generally has a strong evidence-based support individually, it is difficult to assess any one of them within the larger ULD “multiple means” milieu of options. It is especially difficult to do this in regard to learners associated with any particular disability category. When it comes to targeted instruction, learner characteristics matter. It follows then that when it comes to developing an instructional design, that the learning characteristics of a targeted population be first and foremost considered as the point of departure in the design and development process. This chapter considers a wide range of instructional targets within the context of specific disability groups with a focus on learning goals, instructional design supports for those goals, and underlying cognitive processes that may help clarify the goals themselves as well as the instructional supports to achieve those goals.

Details

Accessible Instructional Design
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-288-7

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2015

Evelyn Hickey

Barriers exist on large scale assessment when students are not able to perform at potential for a variety of reasons. Accommodations are mostly available for students who…

Abstract

Barriers exist on large scale assessment when students are not able to perform at potential for a variety of reasons. Accommodations are mostly available for students who meet criteria for diagnosed disability or criteria for the identification of students who have English as a second language. However, knowing that students have diverse needs, accommodations for a few may not be providing appropriate access for all. Options for designing broader universal design for learning (UDL) on large scale assessment, through strategies that are typically restricted to special accommodations, increase access.

Details

Accessible Instructional Design
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-288-7

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 25 October 2016

Bob Algozzine, Kelly Anderson and Cynthia Baughan

Educating students with disabilities in the same classrooms and instructional environments as their natural neighbors and peers (i.e., inclusion) is a promise of…

Abstract

Educating students with disabilities in the same classrooms and instructional environments as their natural neighbors and peers (i.e., inclusion) is a promise of significant substance and value for many special educators. When federal legislation mandated that students with disabilities receive a free and appropriate education in least restrictive environments, at least in principle, the schoolhouse doors were opened for all students. In this chapter, we provide a brief historical review of efforts to educate students with disabilities in inclusive environments and provide direction for what we believe are important practices for creating high-quality inclusive learning environments.

Details

General and Special Education Inclusion in an Age of Change: Roles of Professionals Involved
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-543-0

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2015

Dave L. Edyburn and Keith D. Edyburn

In grades K-3, the primary focus of instruction is learning to read. In grades 4 and beyond, however, the focus shifts to reading to learn. Whereas teachers may use a…

Abstract

In grades K-3, the primary focus of instruction is learning to read. In grades 4 and beyond, however, the focus shifts to reading to learn. Whereas teachers may use a variety of instructional approaches, research has clearly documented that learning from text is the primary instructional model found in most classrooms. This means that efforts to close the achievement gap must focus on ensuring that all students can access text-based learning materials, engage with the content in meaningful ways, and ultimately demonstrate success in the form of measurable gains in learning outcomes. Whereas the philosophy of UDL is relatively easy to understand, it has proven problematic to design, implement, evaluate, and scale. The purpose of this chapter is to describe a universal design engineering approach known as Design for More Types that can be applied to the design of text-based learning materials, this chapter will describe the conceptual and practical issues involved in the development of text-based learning materials for diverse learners. We begin by providing some foundational concepts for this multidisciplinary work. Next, we provide a series of case studies to illustrate how universal usability can be applied to various instructional designs. Finally, we describe how the Design for More Types framework can be used in both research and practice.

Details

Accessible Instructional Design
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-288-7

Keywords

1 – 10 of 199