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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/eb007296. When citing the…

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/eb007296. When citing the article, please cite: C. Wrubl, A. Mollica, U. Montini, A. Litigio, (1991), “Corrosion performance of cataphoretically painted specimens: A comparison between salt spray and continuous immersion tests”, Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, Vol. 38 Iss: 6, pp. 11 - 15.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1991

C. Wrubl, A. Mollica, U. Montini and A. Litigio

The salt‐spray test is still today often utilized to control the anticorrosive performance of paints applied on metallic substrates. The time required for this test method…

Abstract

The salt‐spray test is still today often utilized to control the anticorrosive performance of paints applied on metallic substrates. The time required for this test method is much shorter than that necessary to carry out the atmospheric exposure test (some weeks instead of many years). Nevertheless the results provided by the salt spray test are only qualitative and their extrapolability to the real behaviour of the paint system's film‐metallic substrate is very difficult. Moreover, in some cases there is a discrepancy between the results of the salt spray test and the reality; for instance, it was observed some time ago that hot‐dip galvanized steel constitutes a better substrate for paints than bare steel, whereas the salt spray test results indicate the contrary. The present work represents only a part of a more conspicuous set of observations devoted to a comparison of laboratory and field results. In this first stage we examined, by means of salt spray and total immersion tests, the behaviour of bare steel and hot‐dip galvanized steel substrates, both phosphatized and coated by the same paint. The aim of this work was to ascertain if the results of the two methods are in accordance and, moreover, to compare the qualitative information given by the salt spray tests with those, quantitative, obtained by the electrode impedance technique on specimens immersed in 3% NaCl solution. By means of this technique it is possible to determine at the same time the values of the paint film resistance, of its capacitance, of the polarisation resistance and of the double layer pseudocapacitance related to the corrosion taking place on the metallic substrate and to ascertain the eventual intervention of diffusive phenomena into the corrosive process. Finally, this electrochemical method, because its non‐destructive nature, permits one to observe the variation of the values of overmentioned parameters as a function of time and therefore to interpret the evolution of the corrosion process.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 38 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

C. Wrubl, M. Fassin, A. Buffoli and A. Mollica

In the present work, the protective properties of inhibitive pigments in two epoxy‐primers against corrosion of the aluminium alloy 2024T3 in marine atmosphere were…

Abstract

In the present work, the protective properties of inhibitive pigments in two epoxy‐primers against corrosion of the aluminium alloy 2024T3 in marine atmosphere were investigated, the first containing SrCrO4 and the second Zn3(PO4)2. Potentiostatic polarisation and impedance measurement methods were utilised to evaluate, both the spontaneous onset of defects on coated samples and the propagation of a small artificial defect of known dimension applied since the beginning of the test on each sample, during 24 months of exposure to the marine atmosphere. These techniques enabled a quantitative evaluation of the protective efficiency of the two primers to be made, and for the effects of the surface pre‐treatments of the metallic substrate to be investigated.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 50 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2019

Siri Suh

To explore the politics of gender, health, medicine, and citizenship in high-income countries, medical sociologists have focused primarily on the practice of legal…

Abstract

To explore the politics of gender, health, medicine, and citizenship in high-income countries, medical sociologists have focused primarily on the practice of legal abortion. In middle- and low-income countries with restrictive abortion laws, however, medical sociologists must examine what happens when women have already experienced spontaneous or induced abortion. Post-abortion care (PAC), a global reproductive health intervention that treats complications of abortion and has been implemented in nearly 50 countries worldwide, offers important theoretical insights into transnational politics of abortion and reproduction in countries with restrictive abortion laws. In this chapter, I draw on my ethnography of Senegal’s PAC program to examine the professional, clinical, and technological politics and practices of obstetric care for abortions that have already occurred. I use the sociological concepts of professional boundary work and boundary objects to demonstrate how Senegalese health professionals have established the political and clinical legitimacy of PAC. I demonstrate the professional precariousness of practicing PAC for physicians, midwives, and nurses. I show how the dual capacity of PAC technologies to terminate pregnancy and treat abortion complications has limited their circulation within the health system, thereby reducing quality of care. Given the contradictory and complex global landscape of twenty-first-century abortion governance, in which pharmaceutical forms of abortion such as Misoprostol are increasingly available in developing countries, and as abortion restrictions are increasingly enforced across the developed world, PAC offers important theoretical opportunities to advance medical sociology research on abortion politics and practices in the global North and South.

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2018

Stefan Colza Lee and William Eid Junior

This paper aims to identify a possible mismatch between the theory found in academic research and the practices of investment managers in Brazil.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify a possible mismatch between the theory found in academic research and the practices of investment managers in Brazil.

Design/methodology/approach

The chosen approach is a field survey. This paper considers 78 survey responses from 274 asset management companies. Data obtained are analyzed using independence tests between two variables and multiple regressions.

Findings

The results show that most Brazilian investment managers have not adopted current best practices recommended by the financial academic literature and that there is a significant gap between academic recommendations and asset management practices. The modern portfolio theory is still more widely used than the post-modern portfolio theory, and quantitative portfolio optimization is less often used than the simple rule of defining a maximum concentration limit for any single asset. Moreover, the results show that the normal distribution is used more than parametrical distributions with asymmetry and kurtosis to estimate value at risk, among other findings.

Originality/value

This study may be considered a pioneering work in portfolio construction, risk management and performance evaluation in Brazil. Although academia in Brazil and abroad has thoroughly researched portfolio construction, risk management and performance evaluation, little is known about the actual implementation and utilization of this research by Brazilian practitioners.

Details

RAUSP Management Journal, vol. 53 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2531-0488

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 17 May 2012

Adele E. Clarke

My early life was punctuated by turning points and transformations that gradually led to a surprising and late-blooming academic career – my first “real” sociology…

Abstract

My early life was punctuated by turning points and transformations that gradually led to a surprising and late-blooming academic career – my first “real” sociology position began when I was 44. Here I trace six different trajectories of scholarly work which have compelled me: feminist women's health and technoscience studies; social worlds/arenas and the disciplinary emergence of reproductive sciences; the sociology of work and scientific practices; biomedicalization studies; grounded theory and situational analysis as qualitative research methods; and symbolic interaction-ists and -isms. I have circled back across them multiple times. Instead of seeing a beautifully folded origami of a life, it feels more like a crumpled wad of newspapers from various times. Upon opening and holding them up to the light in different ways, stories may be slowly discerned. I try to capture here some of the sweetness and fragility of these moments toward the end of an initially stuttering but later wondrously gratifying career.

Details

Blue-Ribbon Papers: Behind the Professional Mask: The Autobiographies of Leading Symbolic Interactionists
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-747-5

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Article
Publication date: 29 January 2018

Djula Borozan and Dubravka Pekanov Starcevic

The purpose of this paper is to explore the developments in final electricity consumption, estimate the portions of changes that can be attributed to national, sectoral or…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the developments in final electricity consumption, estimate the portions of changes that can be attributed to national, sectoral or regional factors, and to investigate determinants of the regional component (RC) in Croatia at the subnational level in the period 2001-2013.

Design/methodology/approach

In the first stage, the dynamic shift-share method is used to decompose final electricity consumption, and then, in the second stage, the panel population-averaged logit model is conducted to find the main determinants of the extracted RC.

Findings

The results show that both the sectoral factor and the regional factor are responsible for an increase in electricity consumption over the period considered, whereby the regional specificities had a larger impact in general. Thereby, the most developed regions, including the tourism-oriented ones, exhibited the largest average increase in electricity consumption mainly due to positive effects of the regional-specific factors, while the negative effects of these factors were mainly responsible for low average rates of changes in electricity consumption in less developed regions.

Practical implications

The results suggest that regional-specific energy conservation programs might be more effective in improving energy efficiency than the sector-oriented ones, as well as that socio-economic and contextual determinants matter when it comes to the probability of having a positive regional effect on the electricity consumption rate.

Originality/value

The paper investigated the determinants of the extracted RC which has not yet been addressed in the energy economics literature.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 11 December 2007

Duncan Wilson

Debates regarding patient claims to extant tissue samples are often cited as beginning with the infamous US case of John Moore vs. the Regents of the University of…

Abstract

Debates regarding patient claims to extant tissue samples are often cited as beginning with the infamous US case of John Moore vs. the Regents of the University of California (1984–1990) – where the plaintiff unsuccessfully tried to claim title in a cell line derived from his excised spleen. Following the 1990 Supreme Court verdict, the issue of patient property in excised tissue was held by certain bioethicists as the ethical problem inhering in biomedical research from the 1980s onward: encompassing debates about a newly-avaricious biotechnology, consent, autonomy and identity. I show here that the concept of patient property was first mooted during the 1970s, some 10 years before Moore, as a response to US-based criticism of the use of foetal and human tissues in research. Rather than representing a struggle between an avaricious science and misled patients, it evolved as a result of debates between philosophers, lawyers, scientists and members of the public, amidst broader debates regarding human experimentation and abortion. Moreover, the first person to assert a patient's right to their own, or their family's tissue, in a legal arena was a scientist. This article attempts to investigate, through the evolution of ownership debates, how bioethicists and scientists themselves construct what counts as ‘public opinion’.

Details

Bioethical Issues, Sociological Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1438-6

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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2018

Naeem Gul Gilal, Jing Zhang and Faheem Gul Gilal

In the modern era, the significance of product design has increased because customers’ priorities in the evaluation of products have changed from product price to product…

Abstract

Purpose

In the modern era, the significance of product design has increased because customers’ priorities in the evaluation of products have changed from product price to product design. Companies consider product design to be one of the most important sources of competitive advantage and standards for evaluating their performance. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to develop and validate a new scale to measure product design along with its dimensions.

Design/methodology/approach

An extensive literature review and consumer interviews and surveys were conducted to generate an initial item pool. Exploratory factor analysis was used to reduce the initial item pool, and confirmatory factor analysis was performed for measurement validation. A total of four separate studies were conducted for the conceptualization and operationalization of a product design scale.

Findings

Using data from three samples, the authors develop and validate a new scale to measure product design along affective, cognitive, ergonomic and reflective dimensions. Furthermore, the results provide strong evidence of the reliability, discriminant validity, measurement invariance and nomological validity of the four product design dimensions. Finally, the effects of these product design dimensions on harmonious and obsessive brand passion were assessed. The results show that the affective and reflective dimensions appear to be prominent for capturing the obsessive brand passion, whereas the cognitive and ergonomic dimensions are capable of increasing harmonious brand passion.

Originality/value

This is the first study that develops and validates the measurement of product design as a four-dimensional construct that can be transferred to a scale and applied across a wide range of product categories.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Shulamit Ramon, Helen Brooks, Sarah Rae and Mary-Jane O’Sullivan

This review paper will look at internationally existing publications in the English language on mental health shared decision making (SDM) implementation of a variety of…

Abstract

Purpose

This review paper will look at internationally existing publications in the English language on mental health shared decision making (SDM) implementation of a variety of interventions, including different methodologies and research methods, age groups and countries. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of: process, degree and outcomes of implementation; barriers and facilitators; perspectives on implementation by different stakeholders; analysis of the process of implementation in mental health services through the lenses of the normalisation process theory (NPT).

Design/methodology/approach

Following a targeted literature search the data were analysed in order to provide an overview of methodologies and methods applied in the articles, as well as of the variables listed above. Three different types of information were included: a content analysis of key issues, reflective understanding coming out of participating in implementation of an SDM project in the form of two narratives written by two key participants in an SDM pilot project and an NPT analysis of the process of implementation.

Findings

Only a minority of mental health SDM research focuses on implementation in everyday practice. It is possible and often desirable to achieve SDM in mental health services; it requires a low level of technology, it can save time once routinized, and it is based on enhancing therapeutic alliance, as well as service users’ motivation. Implementation requires an explicit policy decision, a clear procedure, and regular adherence to the aims and methods of implementation by all participants. These necessary and sufficient conditions are rarely met, due to the different levels of commitment to SDM and its process by the different key stakeholders, as well as due to competing providers’ objectives and the time allocated to achieving them.

Originality/value

The review indicates both the need to take into account the complexity of SDM, as well as future strategies for enhancing its implementation in everyday mental health practice. Perhaps because applying SDM reflects a major cultural change in mental health practice, current value attached to SDM among clinicians and service managers would need to be more positive, prominent and enduring to enable a greater degree of implementation.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

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