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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1987

Tyrrell Marris

Now that we have reviewed the basic reports, the published special reports and the discussions of the working groups let us see what can be high‐lighted as a conclusion…

Abstract

Now that we have reviewed the basic reports, the published special reports and the discussions of the working groups let us see what can be high‐lighted as a conclusion. How has this Congress advanced the science of tourism applied to mega‐attractions and to mega‐events?

Details

The Tourist Review, vol. 42 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1986

Tyrrell Marris

Introduction: our tastes and expectations There is a saying “some people eat to live; some people live to eat”. Perhaps for many people in the world, and for most of the…

Abstract

Introduction: our tastes and expectations There is a saying “some people eat to live; some people live to eat”. Perhaps for many people in the world, and for most of the time, it is true that we eat to live: just to stay alive. But at other times, and especially for people on holiday, there are occasions when we really do live to eat. We look for places where the meal will be an experience to be enjoyed: an experience to be anticipated with excitement, to be relished in the fulfilment, to be remembered with satisfaction.

Details

The Tourist Review, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1985

Tyrrell Marris

England has a great variety of historic buildings and monuments, often set in fine surroundings. They are our architectural heritage: a growing heritage. Of 5,500 or more…

Abstract

England has a great variety of historic buildings and monuments, often set in fine surroundings. They are our architectural heritage: a growing heritage. Of 5,500 or more buildings of special merit, at least 1,500 are open to the public. They are owned by the nation, by local authorities or non‐profit making trusts, and mostly by private individuals or families. They are spread throughout England, offering many interesting things besides the architecture itself.

Details

The Tourist Review, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1984

C. Kaspar

Excellenzen meine sehr verehrten Damen und Herren liebe Kollegen Es ist mir eine besondere Freude und Ehre, erstmals einen AIEST Kongress in der Sozialistischen Republik…

Abstract

Excellenzen meine sehr verehrten Damen und Herren liebe Kollegen Es ist mir eine besondere Freude und Ehre, erstmals einen AIEST Kongress in der Sozialistischen Republik der Tschechoslowakei zu eröffnen und dies in der prächtigen Stadt Prag, der Hauptstadt und dem kulturellen und politischen Mittelpunkt. Die Stadt ist durch ihr reiches Erbe an kulturellen Gütern besonders für unsern 34. Kongress geeignet. Auf den berechtigten Wunsch der Organisatoren des diesjährigen Kongresses hin haben wir das Thema “Tourismus und architektonisches Erbe — kulturelle, rechtliche, wirtschaftliche und marketing‐orientierte Aspekte” gewählt.

Details

The Tourist Review, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

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Book part
Publication date: 17 May 2012

Laurel Richardson

Laurel Richardson's academic autobiography from preschool to Professor Emerita.

Abstract

Laurel Richardson's academic autobiography from preschool to Professor Emerita.

Details

Blue-Ribbon Papers: Behind the Professional Mask: The Autobiographies of Leading Symbolic Interactionists
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-747-5

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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2016

Susan McDonnell

This chapter explores the role of language in constructing spaces of belonging in the relational lives of young migrant children in Ireland. In particular, it investigates…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter explores the role of language in constructing spaces of belonging in the relational lives of young migrant children in Ireland. In particular, it investigates how friendship is negotiated in linguistically normative school spaces.

Methodology/approach

The chapter draws on the findings and analysis of a larger study of Irish childhoods, race and belonging. The research involved qualitative work with 42 children, from migrant and non-migrant backgrounds. Research was undertaken with classroom groups in two primary schools in a large town in the west of Ireland, and with a small sample of migrant children and their parents in family homes. Arts-based and visual methods were incorporated throughout the data collection process.

Findings

Findings from the research indicate intersections between constructions of belonging in linguistic spaces such as the school and possibilities/constraints for children’s peer friendships. While ‘home’ languages and bilingual ability were valued in home contexts, even these spaces were inflected by the ‘English-only’ exigencies of school and broader societal spaces. Regarding peer friendship, the findings show that proficiency in speaking English was central, both in terms of accessing friendship rituals through ‘talk’, and, importantly, in terms of narrativizing self as viable school pupil and peer.

Originality/value

The significance of this work lies in its examination of the complexity of language as it functions in children’s relational lives. As well as being a pragmatic skill in negotiating and maintaining friendship, it identifies language as a marker of belonging that is shaped by and shapes school spaces, and which has implications for children’s peer friendships in this context. As such, the study points to a role for schools in engaging with and promoting recognition of children’s multilingual resources.

Details

Friendship and Peer Culture in Multilingual Settings
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-396-2

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1928

THE Fifty‐First Conference of the Library Association takes place in the most modern type of British town. Blackpool is a typical growth of the past fifty years or so…

Abstract

THE Fifty‐First Conference of the Library Association takes place in the most modern type of British town. Blackpool is a typical growth of the past fifty years or so, rising from the greater value placed upon the recreations of the people in recent decades. It has the name of the pleasure city of the north, a huge caravansary into which the large industrial cities empty themselves at the holiday seasons. But Blackpool is more than that; it is a town with a vibrating local life of its own; it has its intellectual side even if the casual visitor does not always see it as readily as he does the attractions of the front. A week can be spent profitably there even by the mere intellectualist.

Details

New Library World, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2017

Anestis Fotiadis and Metin Kozak

The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in the perception of service quality among various demographic and behavioural visitor segments within the theme…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in the perception of service quality among various demographic and behavioural visitor segments within the theme park tourism market.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative survey was conducted using a structured questionnaire which was distributed to 655 theme park visitors. Different groups of visitors were identified through the use of cluster analysis based on the evaluation of both demographic variables and a number of behavioural factors associated with their characteristics in terms of “time and cost” allocations for visits to a theme park.

Findings

The findings confirm that differences in demographic characteristics significantly affect perceptions of visitors as demonstrated in the way they are likely to evaluate importance and performance factors in a theme park’s delivery of services. In contrast, behavioural segmentation in terms of time allocation and associated expenditure is unlikely to produce significant differences in the visitors’ perceptions of the level of service provided.

Originality/value

Although there are many studies related to visitors’ perceived service quality, none of them use the same methodology as applied in this study of theme park industry. The research results reveal important implications for the theme park industry because of this new understanding of the segmentation differences for visitor-perceived service quality. By directing attention of management to these differences, improvements in service quality perceptions can more readily be achieved.

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2021

Bushra Naeem, Muhammad Aqeel, Aneela Maqsood, Ishrat Yousaf and Saima Ehsan

This study aims to explore the indigenous needs of married women in Pakistan due to the public health challenges they face due to marital conflict. The research focuses on…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the indigenous needs of married women in Pakistan due to the public health challenges they face due to marital conflict. The research focuses on investigating psychometric properties and cross-cultural validation of the revised dyadic adjustment scale’s (RDAS) Urdu translated version to assess marital relationship quality between married madrassa and non-madrassa women. The study examines empirically validated two-factor model (RDAS) between married madrassa and non-madrassa women (Busby et al., 1995; Hollist et al., 2012; Isanezhad et al., 2012; Christensen et al., 2006) and (Bayraktaroglu and Cakici, 2017). These studies approach including consensus, satisfaction and cohesion.

Design/methodology/approach

The investigators executed the study into two phases: a pilot test and the main survey.

Findings

The pilot study's findings specified that the Urdu translated version of the revised DAS indicated a decent internal consistency (a = 0.70). The overall revised DAS maintained a stronger test-retest correlation and tested it over 15 days (r = 0.95). The main study recorded 300 respondents' responses from madrassa and non-madrassa married women using a purposive sampling approach and recruited them from the locality of various madrassas and housing societies of Islamabad, Azad Kashmir and Rawalpindi, Pakistan. The study findings showed higher intercorrelations between total and subscales of the revised DAS. It further compared the groups with a multi-group confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) method and examined the revised DAS structure in married madrassa and non-madrassa women.

Practical implications

This study contributes to scientific knowledge and helps develop and validate indigenous cross-cultural instruments to examine marital life quality. It offers practical and reliable information about Pakistani couples' emotional attachment and marriage adjustment issues.

Originality/value

The study applied a three-factor solution, and it demonstrated a robust factorial validity in the context of Pakistani culture, which is a novel contribution to the literature.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2013

Stephen Gates

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to explore the proactive role played by investor relations officers (IROs) in enhancing the quality and delivery of corporate…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to explore the proactive role played by investor relations officers (IROs) in enhancing the quality and delivery of corporate social performance (CSP) information to social responsibility investment (SRI) analysts and investors, thereby improving the link between CSP and corporate financial performance (CFP). The increasing pressures on corporations to produce and communicate CSP information will be described, as well as how the timely and meaningful communication of CSP can improve CFP.

Methodology/approach – Subsequent to a review of relevant literature, three case examples from McDonald’s, Nestlé, and Stora Enso illustrate Hockerts and Moir’s grounded theory framework that suggest how IROs can improve communication of CSP.

Findings – This chapter illustrates three levels of communicating CSP information. First, IROs target SRI investors and respond to ESG inquiries and surveys. At the second level, IROs integrate ESG information into business strategy and financial results. At the third level, IROs actively market CSP and create a two-way proactive dialogue between SRI investors and senior management and the board.

Practical implications – This chapter provides practical examples to improve ESG activities and their communication via the IRO to SRI analysts and investors.

Originality/value of chapter – This chapter contributes to the literature on the CSP–CFP link by illustrating how proactive IROs are improving the CSP information channel to SRI securities analysts and investors. Furthermore, it advances the theory and research concerning the impact of the information channel between IROs and securities analysts behind the CSP–CFP link.

Details

Institutional Investors’ Power to Change Corporate Behavior: International Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-771-9

Keywords

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