Search results

1 – 10 of 644
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2011

Ting‐Hsiang Tseng and George Balabanis

The purpose of this paper is to test the applicability of product typicality in explaining the product‐specificity of country of origin (COO) effects.

Downloads
3824

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the applicability of product typicality in explaining the product‐specificity of country of origin (COO) effects.

Design/methodology/approach

To help select stimuli used in the study, two dimensions of product typicality regarding COO images were created. A total of 416 participants from a business school in Taiwan participated in this experiment and rated their perceived COO images and attitudes towards specific products from select countries.

Findings

The results indicate that product typicality can help explain the discrepancies between COO images across products from a country, and across COOs of a product. Typical products received more favourable consumer attitudes and stronger COO images than atypical ones. This study also manipulated two other factors, product type and product category level. While product type had no significant impact on the effects of typicality, tests on product category level revealed enhanced effects for subordinate product categories.

Originality/value

The study provides a stepping stone towards the development of a general theory of COO. By testing the effects of a category‐based concept, typicality, in the context of the COO image, this study formally testifies the applicability of categorisation theories on COO effects, which may provide informative sources for the future development of COO studies. Based on the rationale of typicality, this study also tests the possible moderation effects of product types and category levels.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 September 2016

André Le Roux, Marinette Thébault, Yves Roy and François Bobrie

This research aims to explore the impact of an overlooked variable, brand typicality, on brand evaluation and the categorization of counterfeits and imitations.

Downloads
1432

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to explore the impact of an overlooked variable, brand typicality, on brand evaluation and the categorization of counterfeits and imitations.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design is a 2 × 2 × 2 × 2 mixed design with the first three variables as between-subjects variables and the last as a within-subjects variable on a convenience sample of 287 respondents split into eight experimental conditions. Data are analyzed using Linear Mixed Models.

Findings

Results show that brand typicality and brand name and product appearance manipulations impact brand evaluation and categorization. Regarding brand evaluation, under high typicality conditions, any manipulation of brand name and/or product appearance, from identical to different, results in a less favorable evaluation, whereas under low typicality conditions, only brand name manipulation negatively impacts brand evaluation. Concerning categorization, under high typicality conditions, any change in brand name and/or product appearance results in the item’s categorization as an imitation or a counterfeit, whereas under low typicality conditions, the item may be categorized as either genuine or as imitation or counterfeit.

Originality/value

This research demonstrates the impact of brand typicality on both the evaluation and categorization of changes in brand name and product appearance. It also suggests that brands and product classes are not equal vis-à-vis counterfeiting and imitation. High typicality brand seems less vulnerable to counterfeiting and imitation. Findings are discussed regarding brand vulnerability to imitation and counterfeiting, the importance of considering competitive context, brand management and brand strategy.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Fredrik Lange, Sara Selander and Catherine Åberg

When consumers fulfill consumption goals they make decisions on first, from which product category to buy, and second, which brand to purchase within the product category…

Downloads
1734

Abstract

When consumers fulfill consumption goals they make decisions on first, from which product category to buy, and second, which brand to purchase within the product category. In this article, the relative effects of product‐level typicality and brand‐level typicality on goal‐driven consumer choice are examined. Which level of typicality is more diagnostic of choice? Empirical results show that consumers are, in goal‐derived usage contexts, more likely to choose a less typical and less favored brand from a typical product category than a typical and more favored brand from a less typical product category. Consequently, brands that consumers perceive as inferior may be chosen over superior brands because of the link between product categories and usage contexts. Our results indicate that it may be fruitful for marketers to associate brands and product categories with usage contexts, and that they need to consider brand competitors from other product categories.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 August 2019

Lina M. Ceballos, Nancy Nelson Hodges and Kittichai Watchravesringkan

There are numerous design principles that can guide strategic decisions and determine good product design. One principle that has received considerable attention in the…

Abstract

Purpose

There are numerous design principles that can guide strategic decisions and determine good product design. One principle that has received considerable attention in the literature is the MAYA principle, which suggests that consumers seek a balance of typicality and novelty in products. The purpose of this paper is to test the MAYA principle specific to various categories of apparel. By drawing from the MAYA principle as a two-factor theory, the effects of specific aesthetic properties (i.e. typicality and novelty) of apparel products on consumer response were examined.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental design in three phases was implemented.

Findings

Results revealed that typicality is the primary predictor of aesthetic preference relative to pants and jackets, while both typicality and novelty are significant predictors of aesthetic preference relative to shirts, suggesting that the MAYA principle better explains aesthetic preference relative to shirts.

Research limitations/implications

Understanding consumers’ reactions to product design provides potential value for academics as well as practitioners.

Practical implications

Consideration of both aesthetic properties is needed when implementing the MAYA principle in apparel design.

Originality/value

Although studies have examined the MAYA principle relative to consumer products, few have examined how the principle operates relative to apparel products. The definition of a design principle, such as the MAYA principle, assumes that the logic proposed should apply to all types of products. Yet, this empirical study reveals that this is not the case when applied across different apparel categories.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 April 2015

Nina Michaelidou, Milena Micevski and Nikoletta Theofania Siamagka

– This paper aims to examine consumers’ non-profit brand image, brand typicality and past behaviour as determinants of intention to donate to two children charity brands.

Downloads
1654

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine consumers’ non-profit brand image, brand typicality and past behaviour as determinants of intention to donate to two children charity brands.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this study were obtained from two separate studies via a questionnaire, both in the context of two children charities, one for Barnardo’s and the other for BBC Children in Need charity. A theoretical model is developed, tested and compared across the two charity brands.

Findings

Findings highlight that different factors influence intentions to donate time and money according to the charity brand. Brand typicality is a key determinant of time donations, while the impact of non-profit brand image dimensions on time and money donations differs across the two charities. Past behaviour affects intentions to donate money in both charities but impacts time donations in only one of the two charities investigated.

Research limitations/implications

The study examines specific dimensions of non-profit brand image across two different charity brands and offers theoretical insights about the value of brand image in a non-for profit context in shaping consumer outcomes (i.e. consumer intentions to donate).

Originality/value

The study sheds further light into the notion of typicality put forward by Michel and Rieunier (2012) for two children’s charity brands that differ in terms of their strength and income levels and examined past behaviour as a determinant to donate to charity brands.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 November 2011

Franck Celhay and Juliette Passebois

The purpose of this paper is to study the impact of the level of perceived atypicality in a wine label's design on the consumer's aesthetic appreciation and purchase…

Downloads
1491

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the impact of the level of perceived atypicality in a wine label's design on the consumer's aesthetic appreciation and purchase intent. Furthermore, it intends to highlight the moderating role of perceived risk in the relationship between these three variables.

Design/methodology/approach

Four Bordeaux wine labels providing the same information but with different designs are tested on a sample of 166 individuals. The respondents evaluate the labels in terms of perceived typicality and aesthetic appreciation. They are then asked to indicate what their purchase intentions would be for each label in respect of five different consumption occasions.

Findings

The results indicate a strong preference for the most typical label. However, this preference decreases when the perceived risk associated with the consumption occasion also decreases. For those consumption occasions perceived as less risky, the respondents seem more willing to choose labels with a moderately atypical design.

Originality/value

This research provides some answers to a problem recently raised with representatives of the wine industry: given that consumers seem to prefer traditional labelling, to what extent is it possible to differentiate a product in terms of design? The authors' results indicate that the acceptance of atypical designs is linked to the level of perceived risk at the moment of purchase. A brand that targets consumption occasions that are perceived as only slightly risky will therefore more easily be able to depart from the visual codes of its product category.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Chien-Huang Lin and Ming-Yi Chen

The aims of this study are twofold: to explore the influence of the typicality of brand story and regulatory focus on the effectiveness of argument strength and product…

Downloads
1566

Abstract

Purpose

The aims of this study are twofold: to explore the influence of the typicality of brand story and regulatory focus on the effectiveness of argument strength and product evaluations and to examine the mediating role of being hooked.

Design/methodology/approach

The study performed two experiments which showed how the measured or induced regulatory focus of a consumer in a given situation moderates the relationship between typicality of the brand story and product evaluations.

Findings

The results show that prevention-focused individuals rely on the substance of the message after reading an atypical brand story, whereas promotion-focused individuals are more likely to be hooked by an atypical brand story. Moreover, the findings have also revealed that being hooked mediated the results of the interaction effects of the typicality of brand story and regulatory focus on product evaluation.

Practical implications

A better understanding of the interplay effects between the perceived typicality of brand story and the regulatory focus of target audiences has the potential to help marketers increase the persuasiveness of their communication messages.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first piece of research to examine how the typicality of brand story and regulatory focus can influence the likelihood of a consumer being hooked. Moreover, the present study is among the first to show that regulatory focus is an important moderator of the effects of typicality, and this contributes to the literature of categorization theory.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 49 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 June 2020

Andrew Timming, Chris Baumann and Paul Gollan

This study aims to examine how variations in the perceived gender (a)typicality of front-line staff impact on consumer spending. Gender typicality is defined here as…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how variations in the perceived gender (a)typicality of front-line staff impact on consumer spending. Gender typicality is defined here as traditionally masculine-looking men and feminine-looking women, whereas gender atypicality, in contrast, refers to feminine-looking men and masculine-looking women.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an experimental design, the authors use simulated consumption scenarios across two separate studies, one in the USA and the other in South Korea. In each study, the authors investigate main and interaction effects in relation to front-line employees’ race (white vis-à-vis Asian) and baseline gender (originally male vis-à-vis originally female).

Findings

Across the two studies, consumers spent more money with gender-typical female front-line staff or, alternatively stated, less money with more masculine-looking female front-line staff. The effect of the male service staff was more complicated. In both countries, the authors found a significant consumer preference for gender-atypical (i.e. more feminine-looking), Asian male employees, compared to more masculine-looking Asian men.

Research limitations/implications

The experimental design strengthens claims of not only good internal validity but also weakens the generalizability of the findings. Field research is needed to explore these effects in various workplaces and sectors. The authors also acknowledge the limitations of operationalizing the gender (a)typicality of front-line staff by manipulating facial structures. Future research should manipulate gender (a)typicality using sociological and performative indicators.

Practical implications

The authors contribute to ongoing debates surrounding the legality and ethics of regulating employee appearance in the workplace. Employers must consider whether this type of “lookism” is legally and morally defensible.

Originality/value

This is, to the knowledge, the first-ever study to examine the effect of front-line employee gender non-conformity on consumer behavior and decision-making. The authors show how variations in perceived gender (a)typicality can, variously, promote or retard consumer spending. The study is original in that it shifts the debate from traditional studies of between-gender differences to a focus on within-gender differences. The key value of the research is that it shines a much-needed light on the changing role of gender in the workplace.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Rossella Di Monaco, Sabrina Di Marzo, Silvana Cavella and Paolo Masi

This study aimed to assess if an Italian artisanal pasta filata cheese, named Provolone del Monaco, is perceived by consumers as typical or not and if any variability…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to assess if an Italian artisanal pasta filata cheese, named Provolone del Monaco, is perceived by consumers as typical or not and if any variability exists among cheeses made by different dairies.

Design/methodology/approach

Two experiments were performed. In the first experiment, two artisanal Provolone del Monaco having different ripening times and two industrial Provolone cheeses were evaluated. A total of 95 subjects, divided into three homogeneous groups, first rated the samples in blind condition, then, after having received information about typicality; price, and both sets of information. In the second experiment, the quantitative descriptive profiles of eight Provolone del Monaco samples aged six months and made by different dairies were compared with the quantitative descriptive profiles of the same cheese aged ten months and provolone cheeses made by industrial dairies.

Findings

Consumer results revealed that consumers knowing typicality information gave a better score to cheeses markedly different. The price together with typicality information, represented a quality indicator. Cluster analysis of descriptive scores revealed homogeneity between the equally aged Provolone del Monaco samples. Moreover descriptive data showed that cheese was characterized by several specific attributes, that the consumer, probably, recognized as typical.

Research limitations

It must be noticed that once it was performed in Campania, the results extrapolation to other regions or countries should not be made unless similar results are found.

Originality/value

This study will contribute to better addressing consumer needs and enhancing the competitiveness of traditional foods.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 107 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 31 August 2021

Adamantios Diamantopoulos, Ilona Szőcs, Arnd Florack, Živa Kolbl and Martin Egger

Drawing on the stereotype content model (SCM), the authors investigate the stereotype content transfer (in terms of warmth and competence) from country to brand and the…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the stereotype content model (SCM), the authors investigate the stereotype content transfer (in terms of warmth and competence) from country to brand and the simultaneous impact of these two stereotypes on consumer responses toward brands.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors test a structural equation model conceptualizing brand stereotypes as full mediators between country stereotypes and consumer outcomes. In addition, in a moderated mediation analysis, the authors investigate the role of brand typicality and utilitarianism/hedonism in potentially moderating the country to brand stereotype content transfer.

Findings

Country warmth and competence, respectively, impact brand warmth and competence, thus confirming the hypothesized stereotype content transfer. This transfer is found to be robust and not contingent on brands' perceived typicality of their country of origin. However, brands' utilitarian nature amplifies the positive impact of country competence on brand competence. Finally, brand stereotypes fully mediate the impact of country stereotypes on consumers' brand attitudes and behavioral intentions.

Originality/value

The authors provide the first empirical attempt that (1) explicitly differentiates between consumers' stereotypical perceptions of countries and stereotypical perceptions of brands from these countries, (2) empirically examines the transfer of stereotypical dimensions of different targets (i.e. country to brand), (3) explores boundary conditions for such transfer and (4) simultaneously considers the impact of both kinds of stereotypes on managerially relevant consumer outcomes.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

1 – 10 of 644