Search results

1 – 10 of over 22000
Book part
Publication date: 22 May 2013

Carol M. Trivette and Carl J. Dunst

A translation framework and associated processes and activities for bridging the research-to-practice gap in early childhood intervention are described. Translational…

Abstract

A translation framework and associated processes and activities for bridging the research-to-practice gap in early childhood intervention are described. Translational processes and activities include methods and procedures for identifying evidence-based practices, translating findings from research evidence into early childhood intervention procedures, and promoting practitioners’ and parents’ routine use of the practices. The framework includes four interrelated processes and activities. Type 1 translation uses research findings to develop evidence-based practices. Type 2 translation involves the use of evidence-based professional development (implementation) practices to promote practitioners’ and parents’ use of evidence-based early childhood intervention practices. Type 3 translation includes activities to evaluate whether the use of evidence-based practices as part of routine early intervention have expected benefits and outcomes. Type 4 translation includes activities for the dissemination, diffusion, and promotion of broad-based adoption and use of evidence-based practices. Examples of each type of translation are described as are implications for practice.

Details

Evidence-Based Practices
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-429-9

Article
Publication date: 31 December 2009

Nick Midgley

Ambiguities in the term ‘evidence‐based practice’ (EBP) are often used to hide some of the tensions within the idea itself. This article seeks to clarify what EBP means…

Abstract

Ambiguities in the term ‘evidence‐based practice’ (EBP) are often used to hide some of the tensions within the idea itself. This article seeks to clarify what EBP means and how evidence and knowledge can contribute to the development of children's services. It acknowledges the ‘implementation gap’ between evidence‐based practice and evidence‐based practitioners, and discusses two contrasting perspectives on the problem and its solution. For ‘disseminators’ the primary issue is better translation of findings into practice, illustrated here by the work of the National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE). ‘Revisionists’ look beyond obstacles and drivers to implementation and instead advocate looking again at the relationship between research and practice and propose a number of radical proposals for how this relationship can be re‐envisioned.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 July 2008

Nick Axford, Emma Crewe, Celene Domitrovich and Alina Morawska

This article reviews the contents of the previous year's editions of the Journal of Children's Services (Volume 2, 2007), as requested by the Journal's editorial board. It…

Abstract

This article reviews the contents of the previous year's editions of the Journal of Children's Services (Volume 2, 2007), as requested by the Journal's editorial board. It draws out some of the main messages for how high‐quality scientific research can help build good childhoods in western developed countries, focusing on: the need for epidemiology to understand how to match services to needs; how research can build evidence of the impact of prevention and intervention services on child well‐being; what the evidence says about how to implement proven programmes successfully; the economic case for proven programmes; the urgency of improving children's material living standards; how to help the most vulnerable children in society; and, lastly, the task of measuring child well‐being.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 July 2021

Stephanie Best, Janet C. Long, Clara Gaff, Jeffrey Braithwaite and Natalie Taylor

Clinical genomics is a complex, innovative medical speciality requiring clinical and organizational engagement to fulfil the clinical reward promised to date. Focus thus…

Abstract

Purpose

Clinical genomics is a complex, innovative medical speciality requiring clinical and organizational engagement to fulfil the clinical reward promised to date. Focus thus far has been on gene discovery and clinicians’ perspectives. The purpose of this study was to use implementation science theory to identify organizational barriers and enablers to implementation of clinical genomics along an organizations’ implementation journey from Preadoption through to Adoption and Implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

We used a deductive qualitative approach study design drawing on implementation science theory - (1) Translation Science to Population Impact Framework, to inform semi structured interviews with organizational decision-makers collaborating with Australian and Melbourne Genomics, alongside and (2) Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF), to guide data analysis.

Findings

We identified evolving organizational barriers across the implementation journey from Preadoption to Implementation. Initially the organizational focus is on understanding the value of clinical genomics (TDF code: belief about consequences) and setting the scene (TDF code: goals) before organizational (TDF codes: knowledge and belief about consequences) and clinician (TDF codes: belief about capability and intentions) willingness to adopt is apparent. Once at the stage of Implementation, leadership and clarity in organizational priorities (TDF codes: intentions, professional identity and emotion) that include clinical genomics are essential prerequisites to implementing clinical genomics in practice. Intuitive enablers were identified (e.g. ‘providing multiple opportunities for people to come on board) and mapped hypothetically to barriers.

Originality/value

Attention to date has centred on the barriers facing clinicians when introducing clinical genomics into practice. This paper uses a combination of implementation science theories to begin to unravel the organizational perspectives of implementing this complex health intervention.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 35 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 April 2008

Nick Axford, Louise Morpeth, Michael Little and Vashti Berry

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are acknowledged to provide the most reliable estimate of programme effectiveness, yet relatively few are undertaken in children's…

Abstract

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) are acknowledged to provide the most reliable estimate of programme effectiveness, yet relatively few are undertaken in children's services. Consequently, there are few models with a demonstrated impact on child well‐being, leading to a concern not only that services may frequently be ineffective but also that some may be harmful. This article considers how this state of affairs has come into being and discusses potential remedies for improving both the knowledge base and the quality of interventions. It focuses on ‘operating systems’ that link prevention science and community engagement and so help communities, agencies and local authorities to choose effective prevention, early intervention and treatment models. Specifically, it describes an attempt in Ireland to implement a robust programme of research into children's health and development, to rigorously design new services, evaluate their impact to the highest standard (using RCTs)and integrate the results into the policy process. Based on the authors' extensive first‐hand experience of supporting the work, and the advice of international experts, the article reflects critically on the unforeseen challenges and offers lessons for others starting a similar enterprise.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 October 2021

Mitchell N. Sarkies, Joanna Moullin, Teralynn Ludwick and Suzanne Robinson

140

Abstract

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 35 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 10 September 2021

Rafik Medjati, Hanifi Zoubir and Brahim Medjahdi

In the Lorentz Heisenberg space H3 endowed with flat metric g3, a translation surface is parametrized by r(x, y) = γ1(x)*γ2(y), where γ1 and γ2 are two planar curves lying…

Abstract

Purpose

In the Lorentz Heisenberg space H3 endowed with flat metric g3, a translation surface is parametrized by r(x, y) = γ1(x)*γ2(y), where γ1 and γ2 are two planar curves lying in planes, which are not orthogonal. In this article, we classify translation surfaces in H3, which satisfy some algebraic equations in terms of the coordinate functions and the Laplacian operator with respect to the first fundamental form of the surface.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, we classify some type of space-like translation surfaces of H3 endowed with flat metric g3 under the conditionΔri = λiri. We will develop the system which describes surfaces of type finite in H3. For solve the system thus obtained, we will use the calculation variational. Finally, we will try to give performances geometric surfaces that meet the condition imposed.

Findings

Classification of six types of translation surfaces of finite type in the three-dimensional Lorentz Heisenberg group H3.

Originality/value

The subject of this paper lies at the border of geometry differential and spectral analysis on manifolds. Historically, the first research on the study of sub-finite type varieties began around the 1970 by B.Y.Chen. The idea was to find a better estimate of the mean total curvature of a compact subvariety of a Euclidean space. In fact, the notion of finite type subvariety is a natural extension of the notion of a minimal subvariety or surface, a notion directly linked to the calculation of variations. The goal of this work is the classification of surfaces in H3, in other words the surfaces which satisfy the condition/Delta (ri) = /Lambda (ri), such that the Laplacian is associated with the first, fundamental form.

Details

Arab Journal of Mathematical Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1319-5166

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 August 2018

Christian Olalla-Soler

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the use of electronic information resources to solve cultural translation problems at different stages of acquisition of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the use of electronic information resources to solve cultural translation problems at different stages of acquisition of the translator’s cultural competence.

Design/methodology/approach

A process and product-oriented, cross-sectional, quasi-experimental study was conducted with 38 students with German as a second foreign language from the four years of the Bachelor’s degree in Translation and Interpreting at Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, and ten professional translators.

Findings

Translation students use a wider variety of resources, perform more queries and spend more time on queries than translators when solving cultural translation problems. The students’ information-seeking process is generally less efficient than that of the translators. Training has little impact on the students’ use of electronic information resources for this specific purpose, since all students use them similarly regardless of the year they are in.

Research limitations/implications

The study has been conducted with a small sample and only one language pair from a single pedagogical context. The tendencies observed cannot be generalised to the whole population of translation students.

Practical implications

This paper has implications for translator training, as it encourages the development of efficient information-seeking processes for the resolution of cultural translation problems.

Originality/value

Unlike other studies, this paper focusses on a specific translation problem type. It provides information related to the students’ information-seeking strategies for the resolution of cultural translation problems, which can be useful for translation training.

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1978

W.J. HUTCHINS

The recent report for the Commission of the European Communities on current multilingual activities in the field of scientific and technical information and the 1977…

Abstract

The recent report for the Commission of the European Communities on current multilingual activities in the field of scientific and technical information and the 1977 conference on the same theme both included substantial sections on operational and experimental machine translation systems, and in its Plan of action the Commission announced its intention to introduce an operational machine translation system into its departments and to support research projects on machine translation. This revival of interest in machine translation may well have surprised many who have tended in recent years to dismiss it as one of the ‘great failures’ of scientific research. What has changed? What grounds are there now for optimism about machine translation? Or is it still a ‘utopian dream’ ? The aim of this review is to give a general picture of present activities which may help readers to reach their own conclusions. After a sketch of the historical background and general aims (section I), it describes operational and experimental machine translation systems of recent years (section II), it continues with descriptions of interactive (man‐machine) systems and machine‐assisted translation (section III), (and it concludes with a general survey of present problems and future possibilities section IV).

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

1 – 10 of over 22000