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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Marco Terraneo

The purpose of this paper is to analyze whether and to what extent households living in southern Europe, i.e. Greece, Portugal, Spain and Italy, experience similar…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze whether and to what extent households living in southern Europe, i.e. Greece, Portugal, Spain and Italy, experience similar conditions of financial vulnerability, considering that in comparative research these countries are often grouped together because of the substantial instability of their economies and the similarity of social and welfare model.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use data from Household Finance and Consumption Survey, a quite novel data set that covers the whole balance sheet of a sample of households. The authors compute four indicators of debt burden and in order to study households’ risk of default the authors apply two-part model, which is a valuable alternative to the application of conventional regression models with zero-inflated data.

Findings

Analysis reveals that the burden of debts and the risk of default are very different among the four countries, in particular Spain and Portugal have the highest proportion of financially vulnerable households.

Originality/value

The study is one a few that have directly compared objectives indicators of households’ financial vulnerability in all Southern European countries. Moreover, the authors employ a two-part model, a valuable alternative to the application of conventional logit or linear regression models. In the first part of the model the authors estimate the probability that households suffer financial vulnerability; in the second part, the authors estimate households’ level of vulnerability only for vulnerable families.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2018

Isabel Schäufele, Daria Pashkova and Ulrich Hamm

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the effect of attitudes and socio-demographics on wine consumers’ real purchase behaviour for organic wine.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the effect of attitudes and socio-demographics on wine consumers’ real purchase behaviour for organic wine.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on GfK household panel data, a real market data source of high population coverage. A two-part fractional model was applied as two distinct categories of wine buyers were observed. The first part of the two-part fractional model consisted of a standard binary choice model and defined the likelihood of belonging to the group of organic wine buyers. The second part of the model only took organic wine buyers into account and described their purchase intensity.

Findings

Preferences for organic products and sustainability concerns (e.g. environmental and social concerns) drive organic wine purchases. Proving a causal relation between attitudes and purchase behaviour gives evidence that stated preferences are a reliable indicator to predict consumer behaviour. However, the weak relation between attitudes and behaviour confirms the existence of an attitude-behaviour gap.

Practical implications

Quality benefits of organic wine production need to be communicated to attract new customers. Stronger focus should be put on sustainability issues with the aim of encouraging organic customers to also increase their expenditures for organic wine.

Originality/value

The influence of sustainability concerns on purchase behaviour is still controversial and no study, so far, has analysed real purchase data for organic wine. The results provide new insights on why attitudes do not fully transform into purchase behaviour.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2019

Victor Motta

The purpose of this study is to account for a recent non-mainstream econometric approach using microdata and how it can inform research in business administration. More…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to account for a recent non-mainstream econometric approach using microdata and how it can inform research in business administration. More specifically, the paper draws from the applied microeconometric literature stances in favor of fitting Poisson regression with robust standard errors rather than the OLS linear regression of a log-transformed dependent variable. In addition, the authors point to the appropriate Stata coding and take into account the possibility of failing to check for the existence of the estimates – convergency issues – as well as being sensitive to numerical problems.

Design/methodology/approach

The author details the main issues with the log-linear model, drawing from the applied econometric literature in favor of estimating multiplicative models for non-count data. Then, he provides the Stata commands and illustrates the differences in the coefficient and standard errors between both OLS and Poisson models using the health expenditure dataset from the RAND Health Insurance Experiment (RHIE).

Findings

The results indicate that the use of Poisson pseudo maximum likelihood estimators yield better results that the log-linear model, as well as other alternative models, such as Tobit and two-part models.

Originality/value

The originality of this study lies in demonstrating an alternative microeconometric technique to deal with positive skewness of dependent variables.

Details

RAUSP Management Journal, vol. 54 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2531-0488

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2008

Shinobu Majima

The purpose of this paper is to model the relationships between women's outerwear consumption, frequency of purchase and consumer profiles, and to analyse historical…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to model the relationships between women's outerwear consumption, frequency of purchase and consumer profiles, and to analyse historical changes in particular, using repeated cross‐sectional data on household expenditure.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of over 20,000 female spenders, aged between 16 and 54 were extracted from UK Family Expenditure Survey (FES). Tobit model, “two‐partmodel and pseudo‐panel model were used to estimate consumer demand for women's outerwear, taking infrequency of purchase into account.

Findings

The importance of “fashion” in clothing consumption has risen by two‐fold since the 1960s, measured by purchase probability. Clothing have transformed from durable goods to consumables. Youth, class and women's employment are found to be significantly related to fashion consumption, controlling for the rise in income.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are limited to UK female consumers and to the demographic data that are available from FES. The effects of occasions, serendipity, emotions and weather remain to be assessed in future research.

Originality/value

This paper provides a unique measurement of “fashion” for a comparative social science research across time and space. It promotes the usefulness of the perspective of fashion as a powerful critique against the rationality assumption of neoclassical economics with complementary evidence.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2010

Laia Castany

The purpose of this paper is to analyse why small firms provide less training to their employees than their larger counterparts. The hypothesis is that large firms are…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse why small firms provide less training to their employees than their larger counterparts. The hypothesis is that large firms are endowed with certain firm characteristics that require more training and with some that allow them to obtain larger returns from this investment.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyses the individual contribution of these characteristics to explain the gap between small and large firms in the probability of providing training and its extent using the Oaxaca‐Blinder decomposition.

Findings

Small firms face greater obstacles in accessing training and the main reasons for that are related to their technological activity and the geographic scope of the market in which they operate. Together, these variables explain about half of the training gap in both the participation and the quantity decisions.

Practical implications

The limited access to training of small firms prevents them from becoming more competitive by using a tool that would permit a better adoption of new technology and access to foreign markets.

Originality/value

The paper exploits the data on training expenditure and relates this investment with other firms' strategies, such as innovation or internationalization. It also suggests estimating this type of data by means of a two‐part model.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2018

Nigel Hemmington, Peter Beomcheol Kim and Cindie Wang

Importance-performance analysis (IPA) is an effective tool for firms to prioritise service quality attributes, but has limitations in evaluating and enhancing service…

Abstract

Purpose

Importance-performance analysis (IPA) is an effective tool for firms to prioritise service quality attributes, but has limitations in evaluating and enhancing service quality within a competitive environment. The purpose of this paper is to present an evolved model of IPA – importance-performance benchmark vectors (IPBV) – as a benchmarking tool and investigate its applicability in the context of hotel service quality.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical studies based on self-completion survey data from 150 customers of two full-service hotels in Taiwan were conducted in to examine the practical utility of IPBV.

Findings

Eight key benchmark typologies were identified and expressed as vectors in the IPBV model which are as follows: “sustainable advantage”, “potential strength”, “false advantage or outstanding advantage”, “cease-fire competition”, “false disadvantage or on-hand disadvantage”, “potential weakness”, “dangerous warning” and “head-on competition”.

Research limitations/implications

The paper extends the methodology to more cases, and other service industries to test further the discriminatory power of the model and to explore the descriptors in the IPBV vector model. Alternative seven-point or nine-point Likert scales could be explored to test the discriminant validity using means. The alternative IPA diagonal approach focussing on GAP analysis may reveal alternative interpretations for the IPBV vector model. Other extended models of IPA, which include competitor analysis, should be compared in practice using a data set where both quantitative and qualitative data could be generated.

Practical implications

The paper proposes the two-dimensional IPBV model which retains the advantages of IPA, but also includes competitor or benchmark comparisons which enable organisations to analyse their relative competitive position. The two-part model provides both quantitative information and qualitative interpretation of relativities. The graphical matrix models provide simple quantitative analysis of attributes, whilst the IPBV vector model provides qualitative interpretations of the eight competitive market positions. Vector analysis enables the development of competitive strategies relative to benchmarks, or within a competitive set. Importance is retained and means that organisations can benchmark against a range of competitors prioritising specific attributes for resource allocation.

Social implications

The interpretive utility of the model should be explored with practitioners and decision makers in the service industries. The model has been designed for practical use in industry to inform operational and strategic decision making, its usefulness in practice should be explored and the attitudes of practitioners to the model should be tested.

Originality/value

Traditional approaches to benchmarking have adopted a one-dimensional approach that does not include a measure of the relative importance of the service quality dimensions in specific markets. This research develops a two-dimensional advanced model of IPA, called IPBV, which is based on vector relationships between key attributes of service quality. These vectors are explored and described in competitive terms and the model is discussed with regard to its implications for industry, practitioners and researchers.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 March 2020

Jaume García and Carles Murillo

This study investigates three issues associated with playing sports video games: the correlates of participation (and its intensity) in this type of activity, their…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates three issues associated with playing sports video games: the correlates of participation (and its intensity) in this type of activity, their complementarity with traditional sports and their perception as sport. Given the scarcity of data on esports participation, these results can be seen as an initial approach to these issues with regard to esports.

Design/methodology/approach

Sequential, two-part and regression models are estimated using a sample of 11,018 individuals from the Survey of Sporting Habits in Spain 2015.

Findings

First, the association of the correlates follows different patterns for participation in sports video games and its intensity. Second, complementarity with traditional sports is found using different approaches. Third, young people consider this activity as a dimension of their overall interest in sports.

Practical implications

The different association of the correlates with participation in esports and its intensity can be used to define marketing and brand investment strategies. The complementarity between esports and traditional sports should influence how the actual stakeholders in sport define future strategies to favour the growth of both industries. Finally, the increasing perception of esports as a sport should influence the future organisation of multi-sport events like the Olympic Games.

Originality/value

Using sports video games participation as a proxy of esports participation, this study is the first to provide empirical evidence of the relevance of distinguishing between participation in esports and its intensity, their complementarity with traditional sports and their perception as sport.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Berta Rivera

This paper estimates the impact of public medical resources on morbidity indicators. Since health status also depends on a number of factors that are not directly related…

Abstract

This paper estimates the impact of public medical resources on morbidity indicators. Since health status also depends on a number of factors that are not directly related to health itself, the demographic, socioeconomic and life‐style characteristics of those individuals who are included in the sample are examined. The estimations are carried out using probability regressions and two‐part models in which it is assumed that health resources are exogenous. The results indicate that increases in public health expenditure improve both psychological and physical health.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Book part
Publication date: 6 December 2017

Maria Basílio

Public–Private Partnerships (PPPs) are used worldwide to reduce the infrastructure gap. Public entities encourage private sector involvement through PPPs, but the degree…

Abstract

Public–Private Partnerships (PPPs) are used worldwide to reduce the infrastructure gap. Public entities encourage private sector involvement through PPPs, but the degree of such commitment is affected by several factors, related to the specific PPP project and to the institutional and economic environment in the host country. The purpose of this chapter is to perform an empirical analysis of the determinants of the degree of private sector participation in PPPs in developing and emerging countries. This chapter explores fractional response models to explain the degree of private participation in PPPs using data from 2000 to 2014, obtained from the World Bank’s PPI database. The results suggest that the type of project is a key determinant of the degree of private sector involvement. Favourable fiscal conditions and the existence of explicit support from the government (direct or indirect) increase the degree of private involvement. Multilateral support reduces private participation, emphasizing a substitution effect. In the same way, private sector involvement appears as a substitute to overcome failures in countries with poor financial systems. The results are particularly important for public authorities. This chapter identifies key factors that can foster private sector involvement in PPPs. Although the expansion of PPPs is a well-accepted reality, empirical studies that explore factors that affect the degree of private sector involvement are still lacking. This chapter particularly addresses this topic.

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Public–Private Partnerships in Developing and Emerging Economies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-494-1

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Peyman Akhavan and Farnoosh Khosravian

It is commonly known that intellectual capital (IC) plays a remarkable role in organizations, especially in colleges and academic centers. The purpose of this study is to…

Abstract

Purpose

It is commonly known that intellectual capital (IC) plays a remarkable role in organizations, especially in colleges and academic centers. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of knowledge sharing (KS) on IC.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the extensive literature review, a questionnaire was designed. The questions were composed of two parts; KS questions and IC questions. In total, 352 students completed questionnaires in the Shahinshahr branch of Payam-e-Noor University. Structural equation modeling was used to develop the measurement model.

Findings

The findings showed that KS has a significant positive correlation with IC and its dimensions. The structural equation modeling confirmed the research model and showed a good match with it.

Originality/value

Given that this study aimed to examine KS and IC, it implies that with optimized knowledge management in universities, providing the infrastructures of KS and strengthening students’ motivational factors, KS capacities can be enhanced and IC of universities would be strengthened.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. 46 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

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