Search results

1 – 10 of over 9000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 May 2009

Lynne Anderson‐Inman

The purpose of this paper is to highlight trends affecting student writing and studying in the twenty‐first century and, as a consequence, the changing nature of literacy

Downloads
1434

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight trends affecting student writing and studying in the twenty‐first century and, as a consequence, the changing nature of literacy in this digital era.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses Thomas Friedman's concept of “flattener” technologies that are creating new levels of access and participation around the globe to emphasize changes that learners and schools need to use to become literate. Making use of a vignette followed by discussion of the research relevant to these developments, the features and distinguishing characteristics of these literacies are explored.

Findings

Six overarching recommendations for capitalizing on present and future innovations in technology and communication that provide new potential for twenty‐first century learning and future consciousness are made: competence; convergence; curriculum; customization; collaboration; and connectivism.

Originality/value

The paper provides an overview and insight into some of the many changes and challenges impacting on the world of education due to the large‐scale availability and use of digital text and digital media. The exploration of strategies to capitalize on the media rich environments in which our students live is compelling and evidence‐based.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 28 September 2011

Melissa L. Burgess and Phil Ice

Online learning in higher education has, until most recently, been delivered primarily through learning management systems (LMS) such as BlackBoard, Moodle, and others…

Abstract

Online learning in higher education has, until most recently, been delivered primarily through learning management systems (LMS) such as BlackBoard, Moodle, and others. However, responding to budgetary concerns and burgeoning enrollments, delivery of online learning via multiple open source (free) formats, is quickly becoming an attractive and inexpensive option for online distance and learning programs. Multi-user virtual environments, or MUVEs, are one such option that provides an interactive and socially rich learning experience for learners. In this chapter, the authors propose a dually fused pedagogical framework that has the potential to provide both asynchronous and synchronous online learning activities the elicit critical thinking skills and that further align with additional skills twenty-first century learners and instructors need to compete in today's global society.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

John Chelliah and Elizabeth Clarke

This paper aims to examine pedagogical issues in higher education as a result of the shift to a social networking society where Web 2.0 collaborative technologies increase

Downloads
3221

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine pedagogical issues in higher education as a result of the shift to a social networking society where Web 2.0 collaborative technologies increase user creativity, contributing to unique forms of communication and community building that support a “social constructivism”. In this context, it is becoming clear that traditional pedagogical models cannot be sustained into the future. Engaging the digital generation of students in a learning process that emphasizes creation of skill sets that match views on twenty‐first‐century learning skills (problem solving, self‐regulated learning, collaboration, sharing ideas, focus on learning etc.) as well as views on 21st‐century employability skills (communication, collaboration, creativity, leadership and technology proficiency, etc.) is the new imperative. This paper seeks to identify related pedagogical challenges and to provide some recommendations for higher education institutions towards tackling these challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review of the opportunities presented by emerging Web 2.0 technologies and critical assessment of the challenges in addressing the transformation of pedagogical needs is the approach taken in this paper.

Findings

Emerging Web 2.0 technologies are pervading higher education and have the potential to trigger learning innovation and enhance teaching and learning. However, technologies are and remain tools and cannot by themselves generate innovation, nor realize many educators' vision for technology to improve education. Technology by itself cannot change the nature of classroom instruction unless educators are able to evaluate and integrate the use of that technology into the curriculum. Changes such as addressing organizational and cultural factors that reflect the whole institution governance community's combined efforts to create a new and all embracing concept for higher education are also necessary. By identifying and addressing those dimensions of organizational development which are most affected by drivers and directions of change, higher education can remain relevant in the future.

Originality/value

The paper provides a theoretical analysis in relation to the pedagogical role of social technologies in teaching and learning, with concern for the contrast between generational differences in relation to perceptions of learning and teaching and the limitations of technology.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 June 2019

Zamzami Zainuddin, Yin Zhang, Xiuhan Li, Samuel Kai Wah Chu, Saifullah Idris and Cut Muftia Keumala

This paper aims to analyze the trends and contents of flipped classroom research based on 48 selected empirical articles published during 2017 and 2018.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze the trends and contents of flipped classroom research based on 48 selected empirical articles published during 2017 and 2018.

Design/methodology/approach

The inductive content analysis was used as a methodology to investigate the content of flipped classroom research, including subject-specific areas, methodological approaches, technology tools or platforms, the most frequently used trending searches, countries of research, positive impacts and challenges.

Findings

The results of the analysis were interpreted using descriptive analysis, percentages and frequencies. This analysis found that various subjects were implemented in flipped classroom learning, and some technological tools were also used to enhance teaching and learning. Analysis of the impact revealed that the flipped classroom yielded positive learning outcomes on students’ learning activities such as learning motivation and engagement, social interaction and self-directed learning skills. Meanwhile, the most significant challenges encountered by the instructor were the lack of students’ motivation to watch pre-recorded video lectures or to study the contents outside of the class time.

Originality/value

The findings suggest that the flipped classroom concept might be effective in promoting twenty-first-century learning skills and developing the technology and information literacy competency based on national standards.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Bruce Sheppard and Jean Brown

The purpose of this paper is to extend the understanding of distributed leadership to the school district level as the authors examine how leadership for twenty-first

Downloads
3133

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend the understanding of distributed leadership to the school district level as the authors examine how leadership for twenty-first century learning is distributed within public schools and school districts as they strive to transform their school classrooms from primarily teacher-directed toward more student-centered and technology-enhanced. It contributes to a growing understanding of the inherent distribution of school and school district leadership and helps elucidate how existing leadership machinations can be adapted to facilitate the transformation of public school classrooms from being primarily teacher-directed, to predominately student-centered, technology-enhanced learning environments.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a qualitative study conducted in all school districts in one Canadian province. Data were gathered through interviews of all district technology leaders and principals of two schools (per district) deemed exemplary in their use of technology for classroom learning; focus group sessions with stratified samples of teachers and all district-level program professionals in each district, and semi-structured observations of district-selected technology-savvy classrooms in two schools per district.

Findings

The paper provides insights into the challenges of leading classroom innovation, including costs associated with technology acquisition and the provision of quality professional development. It reaffirms the continued relevance of the school principal while concomitantly confirming the inherent existence of distributed leadership within and across organizational boundaries that can facilitate or impede complex change. Finally, findings from this study serve as yet another reminder that the accumulated, rich evidence base regarding the process of leading and implementing complex innovation appears to be largely ignored by practitioners.

Research limitations/implications

Because the research approach is qualitative and restricted to one defined population, the generalizability of this study may be limited.

Practical implications

This paper draws attention to practical importance of fostering leadership from multiple sources and the need for reflection on how research evidence in education can better directed toward improved practice.

Originality/value

Given the major public expenditures in the acquisition of new and emerging technology for public school classrooms, this paper may foster reflection for improved leadership and implementation practices. The paper anticipates that this work will contribute to a growing understanding of the distributed nature of school and school district leadership. Also, the paper believes it will help elucidate how current machinations of leadership might be adapted to facilitate the transformation of public school classrooms from primarily teacher-directed to predominately student-centered, technology-enhanced learning environments.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 52 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 November 2019

Zamzami Zainuddin, Muhammad Shujahat, Samuel K.W. Chu, Hussein Haruna and Ratna Farida

This study aims to assess students’ learning performance and perceived need satisfaction between a gamified flipped classroom (GFC) and flipped classroom (FC) instruction…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess students’ learning performance and perceived need satisfaction between a gamified flipped classroom (GFC) and flipped classroom (FC) instruction in a low-tech setting. The iSpring Learn learning management system was used as a low-tech gamification application in gamifying the flipped learning class.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative research approach was used for collecting the data. Three formative assessments were used to examine students’ learning performance during the intervention period, and a post-questionnaire survey was used to support the data collection process with regard to students’ perceived needs satisfaction. In total, 56 students were involved in a non-randomised experiment with a control group design.

Findings

The results reveal that Assessment 1 showed no significant difference between the two intervention groups (p > 0.05), while Assessments 2 and 3 were significantly different (p < 0.05). The survey results confirm that participants in the GFC have achieved a great level of motivation because their innate psychological needs for competence, autonomy and relatedness are satisfied.

Practical implications

The use of game-like features can be a powerful means to produce more engaging and fun activities in the FC context. The study has confirmed that integrating the gamification concept into FC instruction by adding challenges, incentives, points and rewards to quiz questions promoted a more engaging and enjoyable experience for learners.

Originality/value

Gamification as a current concept of a twenty-first-century instructional skill has proven to be remarkably influential. This study suggests that the FC and gamification concept might be possibly implemented in a low-tech information environment – without the required advanced technology platform.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 120 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

Abstract

Details

SDG4 – Quality Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-423-1

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 May 2019

Zamzami Zainuddin, Hussein Haruna, Xiuhan Li, Yin Zhang and Samuel Kai Wah Chu

Despite the enhanced popularity of flipped classroom research, there is a lack of empirical evidence reported about the different impacts revealed by the implementation of…

Downloads
1041

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the enhanced popularity of flipped classroom research, there is a lack of empirical evidence reported about the different impacts revealed by the implementation of this concept. Therefore, to respond to this issue, this study aims to review and analyze the trends and contents of flipped classroom research based on 48 studies recently published in 2017 and 2018. The analysis was based on flipped classroom impacts from various fields.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review and content analysis were used as a methodology to investigate positive impacts and challenges of flipped classroom implementation.

Findings

The results of the analysis were interpreted using descriptive analysis. Analysis of the impact revealed that the flipped classroom yielded positive impacts on students’ learning activities such as academic performance, learning motivation and/or engagement, social interaction and self-directed learning skills. Meanwhile, the most significant challenges encountered by the instructors is a lack of students’ motivation to watch the pre-recorded video lectures or to study the contents outside of the class time.

Practical implications

Several issues in this discussion become implications that can be taken into consideration for future research. The findings suggest that the flipped classroom concept might be effective in promoting the twenty-first century learning skills.

Originality/value

While highlighting the limitations of an ineffective flipped classroom implementation, this study proposes further recommendations for future research.

Details

On the Horizon , vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 August 2011

Scott Kratz and Elizabeth Merritt

The US educational system is on the cusp of transformational change. Signals that the current educational structure has been destabilized include rising dissatisfaction

Downloads
2501

Abstract

Purpose

The US educational system is on the cusp of transformational change. Signals that the current educational structure has been destabilized include rising dissatisfaction with the formal educational system and the proliferation of non‐traditional forms of primary education. In the coming era, museums will play a key role in the new educational landscape. A broad and shared understanding among policy makers, reformers and practitioners of the unique capabilities of museums will ensure that the new educational infrastructure takes full advantage of these strengths. This paper seeks to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides an overview of educational innovation in a broad cross section of US museums, citing selected examples.

Findings

There is an emerging consensus that whatever the new educational era looks like, it will focus on the development of a core set of skills. This paper reviews some ways in which museums are helping learners develop the core skills of critical thinking, synthesizing information, ability to innovate and think creatively, and collaboration. The USA needs to scale up the educational resources and skills provided by its museums via online access, better indexing of online resources, physically incorporating museums into schools and schools into museums, and making museums central points for teacher training. This will ensure museums can provide equitable access to their unique resources and fulfill their potential in the new educational landscape.

Originality/value

By applying the techniques of forecasting to the field of education, this paper provides glimpses of potential futures as seen in the vibrant innovations in education currently taking place outside traditional schools.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 19 October 2020

Jill Balota Cross

This chapter focuses on growing professionally and encouraging peers' skills. The author opens by relating her experience in initiating and implementing museum-integrated…

Abstract

This chapter focuses on growing professionally and encouraging peers' skills. The author opens by relating her experience in initiating and implementing museum-integrated instruction as a curricular program at all grade levels. She discusses the steps involved in creating one of the nation's first Museum Magnet Schools, from introducing the idea to her school and district to managing all the logistics needed to support it: funding, partnerships, professional development, curriculum writing, and partnerships. Strategically working with teachers, administrators, and organizations builds upon foundations in pedagogy and curriculum and reduces barriers to implementation. The chapter outlines effective strategies for building a dedicated team of faculty and administrators within your school, using professional development and encouragement to gain “buy-in” for projects such as school and student exhibitions. Such activities change the school culture in positive ways, with teachers becoming “ambassadors” to parents, professional learning communities, and other education stakeholders. Harnessing the power of connections to grow as a professional and growing communities of expertise cultivates performance pedagogy and brings history alive for students. By networking with experts from museums and historic sites, educators can tap into museum techniques such as exhibition design and object-based inquiry, which can be powerful tools for experiential learning. The chapter also contains outreach strategies for effectively presenting such initiatives at professional conferences and employing the power of social media through blogging and Twitter. As the author notes based on a decade of experience, the potential for student engagement from museum-related strategies is a persuasive argument for educators and administrators to collaborate in adapting them.

1 – 10 of over 9000