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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2021

Guy Major Ngayo Fotso

The proliferation of studies on leadership competencies have not yet provided a consistent set to guide the work of researchers and practitioners. This paper aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

The proliferation of studies on leadership competencies have not yet provided a consistent set to guide the work of researchers and practitioners. This paper aims to generate a clear, literature-based overview of the relevant leadership competencies for the twenty-first century.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is an integrative literature review and identifies four strands of literature on leadership, reaching back to traditional works. It reviews each strand to establish which leadership competencies remain relevant for the twenty-first century.

Findings

This paper shows it is essential to clarify and harmonize terminology used in leadership literature. It identifies 18 groups of leadership competencies required for the twenty-first century. The research reveals that leaders of the twenty-first century must be able to combine a strong concern for people, customer experience, digitalization, financialization and the general good.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is based on a non-exhaustive list of literature derived from studies published in Western journals, written in English. Future research should include papers beyond the confines of Western academia and entail fieldwork to test the comprehensive framework derived here.

Practical implications

This paper will help practitioners develop leadership training curricula and transform the leadership culture in their organizations. The competency list can be useful in recruitment and selection processes for leadership positions. Professionals will find it helpful as an index in self-diagnosis and personal development for their career decision choices.

Originality/value

The paper addresses the growing need for clarity on the required leadership competencies for the twenty-first century.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 45 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 8 December 2017

Frederick Thomas Cawood

The purpose of this paper is to interpret current global events to extrapolate the issues of twenty-first century for consideration by African mining policy and decision-makers.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to interpret current global events to extrapolate the issues of twenty-first century for consideration by African mining policy and decision-makers.

Design/methodology/approach

The high-level mining issues are identified to assess what lies ahead for the twenty-first century. Some of these require innovation, called beacons for twenty-first-century mining in this paper, so that decision-makers can consider policy instruments and management strategies to craft a more desirable future for governments and companies, without affecting other stakeholders negatively.

Findings

It is proposed that African mining should consider three cross-cutting elements as subsets for the existing policy themes and management decisions, namely, broad benefit, mine sustainability and business improvement. Digital technologies have the potential to significantly support the three elements for fast-tracking Africa’s sustainable economic development.

Research limitations/implications

Although the findings can be applied to most of the developing world, the focus of this paper is on the African mining industry.

Practical implications

Practical considerations for policymakers in Africa.

Originality/value

This paper includes novel/original policy considerations that have the potential to become cross-cutting elements for the existing policy themes of the Africa Mining Vision.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Yared Mammo Cherinet

The purpose of this paper is to identify insightfully future roles and skills required by librarians to meet the ever changing users’ need in the modern library landscape.

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2848

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify insightfully future roles and skills required by librarians to meet the ever changing users’ need in the modern library landscape.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a qualitative approach. It deployed the Delphi technique and other knowledge elicitation techniques, such as systematic literature review, in-depth key informants interviews, formal and informal discussions, and own experience. Data collection was quitted when it reached to the theoretical saturation. Content analysis was used to analyze the gathered data. Triangulation of methods was also employed to complement one another, and enhance the credibility and validity of the results.

Findings

The findings of the study revealed that some of the roles and skills required by librarians are evolutionary, while others are revolutionary, but the ultimate future role of librarians is to change knowledge revolution into society (to create informed society) through re-socializing and shaping the young generations. The result also confirmed that a synergy of passion, knowledge, skills and cultural intelligence yield blended librarians that fit the future library landscape. To be a librarian is more than just equipped with knowledge and skills; it requires passion and solid discipline. For librarians, unlearning is equally relevant skills like learning.

Originality/value

Instead of the usual skills assessment, this study approached it in a new perspective and divulged a synergy of passion, knowledge, skills, cultural intelligence, professionalism, and discipline as essential assets for the twenty-first century librarians.

Details

Library Management, vol. 39 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Adam Jerrett, Theo J.D. Bothma and Koos de Beer

Teaching students/library patrons twenty-first century literacies (such as information and library literacies) is important within a library setting. As such, finding an…

Abstract

Purpose

Teaching students/library patrons twenty-first century literacies (such as information and library literacies) is important within a library setting. As such, finding an appropriate manner to teach these skills in a practical manner at tertiary level is important. As vehicles for constructivist learning, games provide a unique opportunity to teach these twenty-first century literacies in an engaging, practical, format. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the implementation of an alternate reality game (ARG) to teach these literacies through gameplay.

Design/methodology/approach

An ARG was designed and developed where the core gameplay tasks taught and exercised twenty-first century literacies. The game, once completed, was then analysed as a case study to determine the effectiveness of the game-based approach to literacy learning.

Findings

Throughout the play of the game, players spent increasingly more time in the library, often using it as a common meeting point during play. Players reported that they learnt or exercised the skills that each game task focussed on, additionally noting that the game-based context made the process of learning and exercising these skills more enjoyable.

Originality/value

The findings suggest that the creation of games, whether real world or digital, may be useful in engaging students/patrons with twenty-first century literacies as well as with their local library. The documentation of a successful ARG to teach twenty-first century literacies provides a model for future research to follow when designing engaging library-oriented games.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 69 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 October 2019

Tashfeen Ahmad

This paper aims to examine the actions lecturers, universities and their administrators can take in improving and making political science undergraduate degrees more…

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1810

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the actions lecturers, universities and their administrators can take in improving and making political science undergraduate degrees more relevant in the twenty-first century. This paper will reflect on specific measures undertaken by institutions globally to equip students with unique skills to enhance the value and relevance of their programmes in the context of an increased technologically driven environment.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a qualitative approach to the review of the literature with implications for practice in examining how universities globally are applying strategies in raising students’ skill levels to enhance future workplace value. A review of select institutions obtained from the Times Higher Ranked (2019) universities was used in identifying best practices to prepare a political science student for better employability.

Findings

Contrary to prevailing opinions, a huge skills gap exists for filling the demand for twenty-first century political science-related careers in the public and private sector. The attainment of twenty-first century skill sets and the deployment of technology-driven teaching and learning methods are vital elements in unlocking the value of political science education and providing students with opportunities to advance their professional and career objectives.

Originality/value

Higher education institutions need to reconsider their strategies in the delivery of political science degrees, bearing in mind the increased use of technology and innovative teaching practices. This paper offers insight into how to tailor an exciting and relevant political science programme for the future of work.

Details

Review of Economics and Political Science, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2356-9980

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2010

Anna Marie Johnson, Claudene Sproles and Robert Detmering

The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

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4683

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper introduces and annotates periodical articles, monographs, and audiovisual material examining library instruction and information literacy.

Findings

The paper provides information about each source, discusses the characteristics of current scholarship, and describes sources that contain unique scholarly contributions and quality reproductions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2010

Ghazi Ghaith

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a survey study of the achievement of twenty‐first century skills in higher education.

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1595

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a survey study of the achievement of twenty‐first century skills in higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs a quantitative survey design.

Findings

The findings indicate that the basic scientific and technological skills of reading critically and writing persuasively as well as accessing and using information efficiently have been achieved to a great extent in the context of the study; whereas, mathematical and scientific skills and global awareness and cross‐cultural issues still need more attention. Variations in the level of mastery as well as gender differences in the achievement of certain skills clusters were also identified and discussed in light of the robustness of the theory of the “universal digital native”.

Research limitations/implications

The results cannot be generalized into other contexts and the data were basically self‐reported and not corroborated by evidence from triangulated sources.

Practical implications

Effective dealing with the basic and technological skills should be continued; however, more attention should be given to the development of the skills in mathematics and the sciences. Likewise, the visual‐literacy skills and the levels of global awareness and cross‐cultural understanding and appreciation should be improved.

Originality/value

This exploratory study fills a knowledge gap and may set the stage for further research into the extent to which the twenty‐first century skills are being realized by institutions of higher learning given the scarcity or non‐existence of this research.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 52 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Book part
Publication date: 21 November 2018

Mohamed Melwani, Lee Yong Tay and Cher Ping Lim

This chapter reports on an ethnographic case study of how a group of elementary school teachers designed technology enhanced learning with mobile technology (e.g…

Abstract

This chapter reports on an ethnographic case study of how a group of elementary school teachers designed technology enhanced learning with mobile technology (e.g. notebooks, tablet computers and mobile phones) to facilitate students’ development of literacy and twenty-first century competencies. These teachers designed the school’s literacy pedagogical approach, leveraging the use of technology, namely digital storytelling. The school in this case study is one of the eight Future Schools in Singapore under the FutureSchools@Singapore program. The school has been providing one-to-one mobile computing learning devices and wireless Internet access for its students. The introduction of technology in the classroom makes it possible for twenty-first century competencies to be integrated into literacy development. The conversational framework is used as a framework to examine how the design of the digital storytelling pedagogical approach brings about the various teaching–learning activities – acquisition, inquiry, practice, production, discussion and collaboration. The use of digital storytelling as an approach to integrate information communication technology (ICT) into the classroom has not only modified how ICT is being used in the school, it has redefined how ICT could be used to engage young learners. It has fundamentally transformed conventional storytelling with the use of current state-of-the-shelf (i.e. easily and widely available) technologies. This case study also outlines the processes involved in improving the design of digital storytelling over the years by the teachers. The ecosystem of the school is also taken into consideration and described in detail. Findings suggest the importance of the collaborative efforts of the teachers in the continuous improvements made to this design. The adoption of a learning design framework, such as the one used in this study, can be beneficial to ensure a systematic approach to the design of learning. In addition, the availability of technological infrastructure and computing devices are necessary for the seamless use of technology in the classroom. The just-in-time learning approach is adopted for students to learn technology as they are developing their digital stories.

Details

Mobile Technologies in Children’s Language and Literacy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-879-6

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2013

Anna Marie Johnson, Claudene Sproles and Robert Detmering

– The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

Downloads
8437

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

Design/methodology/approach

Introduces and annotates periodical articles, monographs, and audiovisual material examining library instruction and information literacy.

Findings

Provides information about each source, discusses the characteristics of current scholarship, and describes sources that contain unique scholarly contributions and quality reproductions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

Deirdre Butler, Margaret Leahy, Michael Hallissy and Mark Brown

The purpose of this paper is to describe an innovative model of teacher professional learning that has evolved over a decade (2006 to 2016).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe an innovative model of teacher professional learning that has evolved over a decade (2006 to 2016).

Design/methodology/approach

Working in a range of different school contexts, in conjunction with an ongoing engagement with the research literature, has enabled the development over three phases of a robust yet flexible framework that meets teachers’ expressed needs. At the same time, the framework helps to shift teachers’ pedagogical orientations, as the learning design supports school-focused, job-embedded teacher professional learning, which challenges more traditional instructional environments by infusing digital technologies and other elements of twenty-first century skills into teaching and learning.

Findings

Building on the experiences of the first two phases, the paper reports the most recent phase which expands on the emergence of a fourth wave of online learning to design and develop a massive open online course (MOOC) that potentially enables the massive scaling up of access to this already validated model of teacher professional development. The importance of maintaining key elements, threshold concepts and signature pedagogies in the design of MOOCs for teacher professional learning are discussed, and the paper concludes with early lessons from this latest work in progress.

Originality/value

Challenges are identified relating to the design of the social supports within the MOOC structure to sustain the collaboration, dialogue and ongoing reflection observed across Phases 1 and 2 that are necessary for the changes in pedagogical orientation and classroom practices.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

Keywords

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