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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 13 June 2019

Juma Bananuka, Twaha Kigongo Kaawaase, Musa Kasera and Irene Nalukenge

This paper aims to investigate the contribution of attitude, subjective norm and religiosity on the intention to adopt Islamic banking in an emerging economy like Uganda, which is…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the contribution of attitude, subjective norm and religiosity on the intention to adopt Islamic banking in an emerging economy like Uganda, which is a secular state that is in the early stages of adopting Islamic banking.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a cross-sectional and correlational research design. Usable questionnaires were received from 258 managers of their own micro businesses. A hierarchical regression analysis was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Results indicate that attitude and religiosity are significant determinants of the intention to adopt Islamic banking, unlike subjective norm whose predictive power is subsumed in attitude. In the absence of attitude, subjective norm is a significant determinant of intention to adopt Islamic banking. Overall, attitude, subjective norm and religiosity explain 44 per cent of the variance in the intention to adopt Islamic banking in Uganda.

Research limitations/implications

This study is cross-sectional, excluding the monitoring of changes in behavior over time. Further, the study used evidence from owner-managed micro businesses in Uganda. It is possible that these results are only applicable to Uganda’s micro businesses.

Originality/value

Islamic banking is an emerging phenomenon on the African continent, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa, where most countries are secular states. As such, there are largely no empirical studies exploring the combined contributions of attitude, subjective norm and religiosity on the intention to adopt Islamic banking in an emerging economy after the national adoption of an enabling legal framework. To the best of the researchers’ knowledge, this is the first study that carries out this task.

Details

ISRA International Journal of Islamic Finance, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0128-1976

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 September 2021

Twaha Kigongo Kaawaase, Twaha Kigongo Kaawaase, Juma Bananuka, Zainabu Tumwebaze and Doreen Musimenta

This study aims to examine whether energy governance mechanisms, energy consumption, energy poverty and firm characteristics do matter for sustainable development practices.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine whether energy governance mechanisms, energy consumption, energy poverty and firm characteristics do matter for sustainable development practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a cross-sectional survey of production managers, engineers and chief finance officers of firms under the Uganda Manufacturers Association. The data analysis was mainly done using the partial least squares structural equation modeling.

Findings

The regression analysis results indicate that ownership structure, capital structure, energy governance mechanisms, energy poverty and energy consumption do matter for improved sustainable development practices. Firm age does not significantly matter for sustainable development practices.

Originality/value

This study provides initial evidence on what matters for improvement in sustainable development practices using evidence from developing African countries such as Uganda whose major focus is the attraction of foreign investors. Such countries focus on improvement in economic growth at the expense of social and environmental concerns.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 August 2019

Twaha Kigongo Kaawaase, Juma Bananuka, Thomson Peter Kwizina and Jennifer Nabaweesi

The purpose of this paper is to examine the interactive effects of professionalism in the relationship between intellectual capital (IC) and performance of small and medium audit…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the interactive effects of professionalism in the relationship between intellectual capital (IC) and performance of small and medium audit practices (SMPs) within the context of a developing economy, Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a questionnaire survey of 77 SMPs registered with the Institute of Certified Public Accountants of Uganda through their managing partners. The authors utilized multiple regression analysis to test hypotheses using centered variables and an interaction term between IC and professionalism.

Findings

IC is a significant determinant of performance of SMPs in Uganda; while professionalism when acting alone is not significant, however, results have shown that professionalism interacts with IC to enhance performance of SMPs.

Research limitations/implications

This study, owing to the absence of publically available published financial statements of SMPs, utilizes a questionnaire to collect data on performance of SMPs which could be less objective. Further, as the study is limited to SMPs in Uganda, it is possible that the results are only applicable to Uganda’s accountancy field. In addition, the use of multiple regression is prone to problems associated with sampling error. However, the likelihood of these problems is mitigated by the interface with data and regression analysis diagnostics that were carried out.

Originality/value

This study provides initial empirical evidence on the relationship between IC, professionalism and performance of SMPs in developing economies. The study further indicates that while IC acts independently to influence firm performance, its interaction with professionalism enhances this performance.

Details

Journal of Accounting in Emerging Economies, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-1168

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 3 May 2022

Twaha Kigongo Kaawaase

The purpose of the study is to examine how small and medium audit practices (SMPs) in emerging economies build and anchor on dynamic auditing capability to operate in a turbulent…

1145

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to examine how small and medium audit practices (SMPs) in emerging economies build and anchor on dynamic auditing capability to operate in a turbulent business environment occasioned by the Covid-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts an exploratory qualitative methodology using qualitative data collected with the aid of an open-ended instrument. With the help of a qualitative data analysis software QSR NVivo9, data were analyzed following Gioia's methodology with a four-stage coding process that combines both a deductive and an inductive approach.

Findings

The findings of the study show that to manage operations during the Covid-19 pandemic, SMPs developed and anchored on dynamic auditing capabilities. Specifically, the findings show that this required transformation of existing operational capabilities, shiftiness, flexibility and innovativeness of the SMPs as well as leveraging networking and adaptive sub-capabilities.

Originality/value

The study produces a pioneer result of how to develop and anchor on the dynamic auditing capability by the SMP subsector of the audit industry to continue operations in a turbulent business environment the magnitude of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 10 March 2021

Twaha Kigongo Kaawaase, Catherine Nairuba, Brendah Akankunda and Juma Bananuka

The purpose of this study is to establish the relationship between corporate governance attributes (board expertise, board independence and board role performance), internal audit…

21366

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to establish the relationship between corporate governance attributes (board expertise, board independence and board role performance), internal audit quality and financial reporting quality using evidence from Uganda's financial institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

This study research design is cross sectional and correlational. The study used a questionnaire survey of Chief Finance Officers, Senior Accountants and Internal audit managers of financial institutions in Uganda. Data were analyzed with the help of Statistical Package for Social Sciences.

Findings

Results indicate that board expertise and board role performance are significantly associated with financial reporting quality. Also, internal audit quality is significantly associated with financial reporting quality. Board independence is not a significant predictor of financial reporting quality.

Originality/value

This paper provides insights of what matters for financial reporting quality in Uganda's financial reporting quality. It uses the qualitative characteristics of financial statements to measure financial reporting quality. This paper focuses mainly on the conceptual framework developed by the International Accounting Standards Board.

Details

Asian Journal of Accounting Research, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2443-4175

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 January 2022

Juma Bananuka, Stephen Korutaro Nkundabanyanga, Twaha Kigongo Kaawaase, Rachel Katoroogo Mindra and Isaac Newton Kayongo

The purpose of this study is to examine the extent of and impact of gender diversity and intellectual capital on compliance with Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) sustainability…

1789

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the extent of and impact of gender diversity and intellectual capital on compliance with Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) sustainability reporting standards by Uganda manufacturing companies.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from manufacturing firms in Uganda using a questionnaire survey to find out their perception of compliance with the GRI standards. Data were analyzed using statistical package for social sciences, Microsoft Excel and smart partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS–SEM).

Findings

The results indicate that on average, manufacturing firms in Uganda comply with GRI sustainability reporting standards to the extent of 59%. The results further indicate that manufacturing companies comply more with the GRI 200 (economic performance disclosures) to the extent of 63% as compared with 55% for GRI 300 (environmental performance disclosures) and 58% for GRI 400 (social performance disclosures). The results also indicate that intellectual capital has a significant impact on the GRI-based sustainability performance disclosures in Uganda. However, board gender diversity has no significant effect. In terms of the control variables, only firm size is significant, while firm age, capital structure and auditor type are not.

Originality/value

This study provides first time evidence of the extent of compliance with the GRI sustainability reporting standards using evidence from Uganda – an African developing country. This study widens the understanding of the usage of GRI standards in the preparation of sustainability reports by manufacturing firms in an emerging economy. This study also provides first-time evidence on the role of gender diversity and intellectual capital in GRI-based sustainability performance disclosures using evidence from Uganda's manufacturing sector.

Details

Journal of Accounting in Emerging Economies, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-1168

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 October 2023

Jennifer Nabaweesi, Twaha Kigongo Kaawaase, Faisal Buyinza, Muyiwa S. Adaramola, Sheila Namagembe and Isaac Nkote

This study aims to examine the effect of governance on the consumption of modern renewable energy in the East African Community (EAC), controlling for economic growth, trade…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the effect of governance on the consumption of modern renewable energy in the East African Community (EAC), controlling for economic growth, trade openness and foreign direct investment (FDI).

Design/methodology/approach

The study relied on secondary data sourced from the World Development Indicators, World Governance Indicators and the International Energy Agency (IEA) for the EAC from 1996 to 2019. A panel Cross-Sectional Augmented Distributed Lag (CS-ARDL) model and second-generation panel data models were employed in the analysis.

Findings

The findings indicate that poor governance and inadequate FDI are significantly responsible for the low level of modern renewable energy consumption (MREC) in the EAC. On the other hand, trade openness significantly enhances MREC, while GDP per capita has no significant effect on MREC.

Originality/value

The consumption of modern renewable energy sources (excluding the traditional use of biomass) and its determinants, as most studies focus on renewable energy consumption as a whole. The study also employed the panel CS-ARDL model and second-generation panel data models.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 December 2023

Jennifer Nabaweesi, Twaha Kigongo Kaawaase, Faisal Buyinza, Muyiwa Samuel Adaramola, Sheila Namagembe and Isaac Nabeta Nkote

Modern renewable energy is crucial for environmental conservation, sustainable economic growth and energy security, especially in developing East African nations that heavily use…

Abstract

Purpose

Modern renewable energy is crucial for environmental conservation, sustainable economic growth and energy security, especially in developing East African nations that heavily use traditional biomass. Thus, this study aims to examine urbanization and modern renewable energy consumption (MREC) in East African community (EAC) while controlling for gross domestic product (GDP), population growth, foreign direct investment (FDI), industrialization and trade openness (TOP).

Design/methodology/approach

This study considers a balanced panel of five EAC countries from 1996 to 2019. Long-run dynamic ordinary least squares (DOLS) and fully modified ordinary least squares estimations were used to ascertain the relationships while the vector error-correction model was used to ascertain the causal relationship.

Findings

Results show that urbanization, FDI, industrialization and TOP positively affect MREC. Whereas population growth and GDP reduce MREC, the effect for GDP is not that significant. The study also found a bidirectional causality between urbanization, FDI, TOP and MREC in the long run.

Practical implications

Investing in modern renewable energy facilities should be a top priority, particularly in cities with expanding populations. The governments of the EAC should endeavor to make MREC affordable among the urban population by creating income-generating activities in the urban centers and sensitizing the urban population to the benefits of using MREC. Also, the government may come up with policies that enhance the establishment of lower prices for modern renewable energy commodities so as to increase their affordability.

Originality/value

MREC is a new concept in the energy consumption literature. Much of the research focuses on renewable energy consumption including the use of traditional biomass which contributes to climate change negatively. Besides, the influence of factors such as urbanization has not been given significant attention. Yet urbanization is identified as a catalyst for MREC.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 December 2023

Brendah Akankunda, Stephen Korutaro Nkundabanyanga, Muyiwa Samuel Adaramola and Twaha Kigongo Kaawaase

The purpose of this study is to investigate the connections between the regulatory governance, human capital, stakeholder orientation, management control systems (MCSs) and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the connections between the regulatory governance, human capital, stakeholder orientation, management control systems (MCSs) and sustainable performance (SP) of power companies. The authors especially looked at how much regulatory governance, human capital, stakeholder orientation and MCSs affect the SP across power companies in Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a cross-sectional and correlational study. Data were collected from 105 power companies using a questionnaire and analysed using SPSS.

Findings

Stakeholder orientation, MCSs, human capital and regulatory governance significantly predict variances in the SP of power providers in Uganda. Stakeholder orientation is the most important predictor of SP of power companies.

Research limitations/implications

The absence of validation from important stakeholders and the major reliance on company-provided data in existing research on SP raises the possibility of self-desirability bias. To evaluate and verify the information supplied by firms with external stakeholders, further studies might consider using an explanatory mixed methods technique, in which quantitative data are initially gathered from the managers of power companies and analysed and then validated by interviews with important stakeholders.

Originality/value

Using stakeholder, legitimacy and resource-based theories has provided a better explanation for SP which is a multi-dimensional notion. Moreover, the study adds to the body of perception-based research that offers direct management incentives for SP. The perspectives of managers have been gathered through the use of self-administered questionnaires to gather impressions of managers of businesses, which has helped to tap into all aspects of SP. The study’s results offer, probably for the first time to the best of the authors’ knowledge, evidence of the contextual elements that affect SP in African nations like Uganda particularly in the power sector.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 July 2023

Dorcus Kalembe, Twaha Kigongo Kaawaase, Stephen Korutaro Nkundabanyanga and Isaac Newton Kayongo

The purpose of this study is to establish the relationship between chief executive officer (CEO) power, audit committee effectiveness and earnings quality in regulated firms in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to establish the relationship between chief executive officer (CEO) power, audit committee effectiveness and earnings quality in regulated firms in Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors employed cross-sectional and correlational research designs, based on a sample of 136 regulated firms in Uganda. Data were collected using a questionnaire survey from Chief Finance Officers and Chief Audit Executives. Data were analyzed using a Statistical Package for Social Sciences and Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modeling.

Findings

Results indicate that CEO power causes negative variances in earnings quality. The results also reveal that audit committee effectiveness positively relates relatively similarly with earnings quality. In addition, CEO power and audit committee effectiveness are negative and significantly related. The results further indicate that CEO power and earnings quality are mediated by audit committee effectiveness.

Research limitations/implications

CEO power creates an opaque accounting environment which may leave the stakeholders unable to evaluate the true economic reality of the firm. Audit committee effectiveness is an important enabler for reporting high-quality earnings even in the presence of a powerful CEO.

Originality/value

This study contributes toward a methodological stance of using perceptions to understand earnings quality in regulated firms in Uganda. This is probably the first study that has specifically explored earnings quality using only the fundamental qualitative characteristics of accounting information (as proxies) as enshrined in the Conceptual Framework for Financial Reporting 2018 particularly in Uganda since Her adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards in 1998. Second, the indirect effect of audit committee effectiveness and CEO power is tested.

Details

Journal of Accounting in Emerging Economies, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-1168

Keywords

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