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Book part
Publication date: 30 May 2013

Romeo V. Turcan

This chapter introduces and discusses the concept of turning points from the ontological, epistemological and methodological perspectives, applying it to the…

Abstract

This chapter introduces and discusses the concept of turning points from the ontological, epistemological and methodological perspectives, applying it to the de-internationalization phenomenon to exemplify its deployment. As a concept that adds to the variance and complexity of the international business and management field, the turning point is seen as a valuable unit of analysis within the research field. It is expected that this chapter will encourage a dynamic scholarly conversation about the concept of turning point and how it can aid international business researchers in the development of a generalizable international business and management theory.

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Philosophy of Science and Meta-Knowledge in International Business and Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-713-9

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2009

Kevin McCormack, Jurgen Willems, Joachim van den Bergh, Dirk Deschoolmeester, Peter Willaert, Mojca Indihar Štemberger, Rok Škrinjar, Peter Trkman, Marcelo Bronzo Ladeira, Marcos Paulo Valadares de Oliveira, Vesna Bosilj Vuksic and Nikola Vlahovic

The purpose of this paper is to report on the results of research into the precedence of the maturity factors, or key turning points in business process maturity (BPM…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the results of research into the precedence of the maturity factors, or key turning points in business process maturity (BPM) implementation efforts. A key turning point is a component of BPM that stabilizes within an organization and leads to the next maturity level.

Design/methodology/approach

Several years of data from over 1,000 companies in the USA, Europe, China, and Brazil that have completed a BPM assessment are analyzed to identify which components of BPM stabilize, when and in what order. Different analysis methods are employed in order to identify global commonalities and differences.

Findings

The paper identifies key turning points from several different perspectives using several different approaches and develops some conclusions common to all methods used in this research.

Research limitations/implications

The relationship between the components (dependencies) is only suggested but not statistically analyzed. Several data sets are also on the low end of sample size for the methods used and some parts of the research used ad hoc selection of companies of arbitrarily distributed companies into different groups.

Practical implications

The results can be useful for leaders and teams that are attempting the journey to process maturity. The guide‐posts, milestones, and measures can help answer the question “Where am I on this journey and what is next?”

Originality/value

A plethora of maturity models has emerged that claim to guide an organization through the process of building levels of maturity that lead to competitive advantage. To date, there has been a lack of quantitative studies documenting these road‐maps. The paper provides global, quantitative evidence of the critical maturity components associated at each level of maturity.

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Business Process Management Journal, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

Sotiris Tsolacos

The purpose of this paper is to assess the behaviour of economic sentiment indicators at rent‐growth turning points and indicators' ability to forecast such turning points

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the behaviour of economic sentiment indicators at rent‐growth turning points and indicators' ability to forecast such turning points. More specifically, the paper looks at whether early signals are generated for forthcoming periods of negative and positive office rent growth. The analysis aims to complement structural model forecasting in the real estate market with short‐term forecasting techniques designed to predict turning points.

Design/methodology/approach

The objective of this study is achieved by deploying a probit model to examine the ability of economic sentiment indicator series to signal the direction of office rents and the strength of movement in this direction. The main advantage of this approach is that it is geared towards predicting turning points. Probit models are non‐linear in nature, and as such they can capture more effectively the likely asymmetric adjustments when turning points occur than linear methodologies would. The analysis is applied to three major office centres – La Défense, London City, and Frankfurt – to examine whether the results will differ by geography.

Findings

The findings reveal that the probit methodology utilising information from economic sentiment indicators generates advance signals for periods of contraction and expansion in office rents across all three markets: La Défense, London City, and Frankfurt. The lead times for La Défense and Frankfurt are longer than those for London City and range between three and nine months. The evidence in this paper clearly supports the appeal of sentiment indicators and probit analysis to inform forecasting and risk assessment processes.

Originality/value

Acknowledging the limitations of structural models and related methodologies and the lack of adequate research on turningpoint prediction in the real estate market, this study forecasts episodes of negative and positive office rent growth applying appropriate techniques and data that lead economic activity, are of monthly frequency, and are not revised historically. The paper raises awareness of a forecasting approach that should complement structural models and judgmental forecasting, given its suitability for short‐term forecasting and for signalling turning points in advance.

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Journal of European Real Estate Research, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-9269

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2018

Stephan Bingemer

The International Air Transport Association (IATA) New Distribution Capability (NDC) standard aims at modernising the airline distribution landscape. It has supported the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The International Air Transport Association (IATA) New Distribution Capability (NDC) standard aims at modernising the airline distribution landscape. It has supported the spread of Direct Connects by providing a common standard for linking airlines to travel agencies. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the historical development of airline distribution and to derive implications for the future.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper follows the approach of Yeoman and McMahon-Beattie (2017) in providing a chronological account based on published research.

Findings

Direct Connects are discussed to be a step back in the evolution of the distribution landscape because they foster disaggregation. An analysis of the history of distribution finds that a comparison of Direct Connects to the early stages of computer reservation system technology falls short to recognise the tremendous technological and market changes connected to the internet, cloud computing and the rise of low-cost carriers. Moreover, drawing on the seminal article by Anderson and Tushman (1990) on technical discontinuities and dominant designs, the current state of the distribution landscape is characterised to be an era of ferment that is driven by design competition and that might end up in a new dominant design.

Originality/value

The originality of this paper lies in a critical review of the turning points of distribution. By reviewing the past developments, the paper sheds light on the contribution that IATA NDC and Direct Connect technology might deliver to the field of airline distribution.

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Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Frank W. Paul and Marvin W. Dixon

Summarizes the work conducted on the research and development of machinery to automate the turning and pressing of collars and their automated assembly to the shirt‐collar…

Abstract

Summarizes the work conducted on the research and development of machinery to automate the turning and pressing of collars and their automated assembly to the shirt‐collar bands sponsored by the Defense Logistics Agency. This research and development has involved the conceptualization, design and development of proof‐of‐concept shirt‐collar turning and pressing processes based on “double‐point turning and pressing” and their systems integration into a robot‐assisted apparel workstation. The work has also involved a second activity to understand, design and develop technology which can temporarily fold and crease single‐ply shirt‐collar bands for continuous automated assembly of shirt collars and collar‐bands. This work has involved the understanding of the folding and creasing properties of various apparel fabrics, the evaluation of two technology approaches for accomplishing this task, and the attachment machine control technology for high‐speed collar and collar‐band joining.

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International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 4 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Otto Hieronymi

As at the end of the Cold War, today there is no desirable or superior alternative to a universal liberal international order. However, a liberal order is not automatic…

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310

Abstract

As at the end of the Cold War, today there is no desirable or superior alternative to a universal liberal international order. However, a liberal order is not automatic and today we are at a major turning point where we face two alternative scenarios: a turn for the worse or a turn for the better. The crisis in Iraq underscores the need to reaffirm and strengthen the democratic liberal international order. Concludes that the chances of a turn for the better are higher than those of a turn for the worse, i.e. the strengthening of the liberal international order is more likely than its disintegration and breakdown. There is a need for new initiatives, solidarities, consensus, intellectual and political leadership from all the countries that share the same vision of a universal order. It must, however, be a “voluntarist” endeavor.

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Foresight, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2011

Gemma Bruce, Gerald Wistow and Richard Kramer

Connected Care, Turning Point's model for involving the community in the design and delivery of integrated health and well‐being services, aims to involve the community in…

Abstract

Connected Care, Turning Point's model for involving the community in the design and delivery of integrated health and well‐being services, aims to involve the community in the commissioning process in a way which fundamentally shifts the balance of power in favour of local people. The model has been tested in a number of areas across the country, and previous articles in the Journal of Integrated Care have charted the progress of the original pilot in Hartlepool. Cost‐benefits of the approach are now becoming clearer. Implementation of a new community‐led social enterprise in Hartlepool began in 2007, and today its Connected Care service provides community outreach, information, access to a range of health and social care services, advocacy, co‐ordination and low‐level support to the people of Owton. Key lessons, from Hartlepool and elsewhere, have centred on the value of making the case for service redesign from the ‘bottom up’ and building the capacity of the community to play a role in service delivery, while also promoting strong leadership within commissioning organisations to build ‘top‐down’ support for the implementation of outcomes defined through intensive community engagement. The new Government's ‘localism’ agenda creates new opportunities for community‐led integration, and the Connected Care pilots provide a number of learning points about how this agenda might be successfully progressed.

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Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Book part
Publication date: 12 October 2012

Larry W. Isaac and Paul F. Lipold

Purpose – We make a case for bridging two types of logics – analytic and dialectic – for explaining processes of social-historical change, and maintain that a successful…

Abstract

Purpose – We make a case for bridging two types of logics – analytic and dialectic – for explaining processes of social-historical change, and maintain that a successful bridge between these two logics depends on a variety of conditions and most especially the type of analytic logic or model one employs for capturing dynamic processes.

Methodology/approach – Conventional models of social change processes typically presuppose ergodic social worlds and are problematic as analytic approaches generally and most certainly are not fertile grounds for feeding dialectic theorization. Instead, we propose modeling dynamic processes that begin by assuming a nonergodic social world – one in flux, one that is nonrepeating, one within which model process and parameter structures are historically contingent and change with time, one that is autocatalytic, creating and changing its own possibilities.

Findings – We develop the line of thinking adumbrated above and illustrate these modeling strategies with empirical examples from US labor movement history. Results from these examples lend much weight to our proposals. Thus, this chapter demonstrates that concerns about the use of ergodic assumptions and about greater use of dialectical reasoning when studying social processes are not idle speculations within theoretical commentaries but have practical consequences in the conduct of research and the building of better theory.

Research limitations/implications – To approximate such an approach, social scientists should avoid cross-sectionalist and longitudinal modeling strategies that presuppose stability and homogeneity in parameter and process structures. Homogeneity and stability in parameter and process structures should be demonstrated, not assumed.

Originality/value – Rather than accepting the alienated spheres of social science analytics and dialectic theory, our proposal presupposes nonergodic social worlds and takes pragmatic steps for estimating analytic models that are more amenable to dialectic reasoning. Models that take nonergodicity seriously not only have the potential to produce better, historically grounded analytics but are also best suited to bridge with dialectic logic, thus taking advantage of the strengths of both forms of logic.

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Theorizing Modern Society as a Dynamic Process
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-034-5

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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2016

Romeo V. Turcan and Anita Juho

The extant research on early internationalizing ventures focuses primarily on these ventures’ start-up phase or their initial internationalization. Scarce attention is…

Abstract

Purpose

The extant research on early internationalizing ventures focuses primarily on these ventures’ start-up phase or their initial internationalization. Scarce attention is paid to how these ventures grow, if at all, beyond their start-up phase or initial internationalization phase. This paper aims to explore how international new ventures transition from the internationalizing phase to the phase of being international, and whether they actually made it to that phase. Understanding whether and how these ventures reach their “made-it” point would contribute to our understanding of how early internationalization affects a venture’s survival and growth. In this, the authors draw on the dynamic capability theory of the firm.

Design/methodology/approach

Given the scarcity of theoretical understanding and empirical evidence in this substantive area of research, the authors adopted a multiple case study methodology for the purpose of theory building. Following an intensity sampling strategy, they purposefully selected information-rich, but not extreme two-case companies. The authors initially collected unobtrusive data in the form of running records and mass-media news reports from the inception of the case companies. They then conducted in-depth interviews with key decision makers of the case companies, namely, their co-founders and CEOs. Critical incident technique guidelines for data analysis were employed.

Findings

Grounded in data, the following constructs emerged related to value creation: strategic experimentation, gestalt tensions and legitimacy lies. Entrepreneurs experiment with and reconfigure their venture at several levels: goal (vision), decision (strategic) and behavioral (tactical) levels of the organizational gestalt to reach a threshold level of practiced activity. Entrepreneurs’ strategic experimentation efforts are fueled by tensions that exist at these three levels of the organizational gestalt. During this experimentation process, entrepreneurs may tell legitimacy lies to legitimate their ventures in the eyes of their stakeholders.

Research limitations/implications

Given the instrument the authors used to explore the issues and concerns identified above, the results are limited in scope. However, a number of questions and conjectures are put forward to guide future research in this currently under-researched area of international entrepreneurship. The authors have also suggested using the concept of turning point in future research to advance the understanding of the dynamic capability view of international new ventures.

Practical implications

Understanding whether and how international new ventures reach their made-it points would contribute to the understanding of how early internationalization affects international new ventures’ organizational survival and growth.

Originality/value

The authors have put forward the concept of the made-it point to aid international entrepreneurship researchers to investigate the continued growth, evolutionary patterns and the organizational survival of international new ventures.

Details

Competitiveness Review, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

B.J. GEURTS

A new algorithm for the inhomogeneous Boltzmann equation in one spatial and velocity dimension, based on the method of characteristics, is presented. Using the analytic…

Abstract

A new algorithm for the inhomogeneous Boltzmann equation in one spatial and velocity dimension, based on the method of characteristics, is presented. Using the analytic solution to the Boltzmann equation along its characteristics, the solution to the classical transport problem in semiconducting structures within the relaxation time approximation for the collision integral is obtained iteratively. An n+nn+‐diode is studied numerically and the effects of ballastic electrons on low‐order moments are investigated.

Details

COMPEL - The international journal for computation and mathematics in electrical and electronic engineering, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0332-1649

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