Search results

1 – 5 of 5
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Rajib N. Sanyal and Turgut Guvenli

A survey of managers in Israel, Slovenia, and the USA finds a marked similarity with respect to the characteristics and abilities managers need to contribute to…

Abstract

A survey of managers in Israel, Slovenia, and the USA finds a marked similarity with respect to the characteristics and abilities managers need to contribute to organizational success. Factors such as decision making ability, communication skills, commitment to organizational goals, ability to choose the right persons in key persons and ability to delegate are considered to be very important although there are differences with respect to the degree of their importance. Several managerial characteristics are also found to be significantly correlated with the firm’s financial success and employee morale. The findings are framed in the context of convergence‐divergence hypothesis as it applies to the internationalization of management practices.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2001

Rajib N. Sanyal and Turgut Guvenli

A survey of employee benefits provided to host country non‐managerial employees in China by American firms indicates that these tend to change over time, vary by the size…

Abstract

A survey of employee benefits provided to host country non‐managerial employees in China by American firms indicates that these tend to change over time, vary by the size of the firm, and differ between wholly owned and joint ventures. Statistical analysis suggests that the use of certain extrinsic and intrinsic benefits tends to be positively perceived by Chinese employees, and in turn, these favorably impact specific dimensions of organizational performance. The findings show that American firms provide benefits that recognize established practices in China and the current needs of Chinese workers. Implications for employee benefits managers in foreign firms are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2001

M. Anaam Hashmi and Turgut Guvenli

Outlines the technological problems which make it hard to deliver high quality video over the internet, e.g. insufficient bandwidth, clients’ machines etc.; and considers…

Abstract

Outlines the technological problems which make it hard to deliver high quality video over the internet, e.g. insufficient bandwidth, clients’ machines etc.; and considers how they might be solved. Describes how digital video, audio presentations and animations can be streamed to a computer and the ways in which various US sectors are actually using streaming media at the moment. Discusses the future for multimedia applications in corporate training, e‐business and higher education; and predicts they will be very widely used as the technology improves.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 July 2009

Rajib Sanyal and Turgut Guvenli

This paper seeks to examine the extent to which national cultural characteristics impact the propensity of firms based in the country to engage in bribery to gain…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to examine the extent to which national cultural characteristics impact the propensity of firms based in the country to engage in bribery to gain advantages when conducting business overseas.

Design/methodology/approach

A set of statistical analyses – bivariate correlations and regression – was performed on data for five cultural variables and one economic variable for 30 countries to ascertain the relationship between these variables on a country's Bribe Payers Index, a measure of bribe giving.

Findings

The results indicate that firms from countries low on power distance or long‐term orientation, or high on individualism, are less likely to engage in bribe giving. However, when the level of economic development in the home country as measured by per capita income is included, the impact of cultural factors is muted considerably. Firms from high‐income countries are less likely to give bribes.

Research limitations/implications

Richer countries are likely to have certain practices that create a business ethos where bribing is the exception, not the rule, in conducting business. The study is based on a one‐time sample of just 30 countries for which bribe‐giving data are available. The data culture is limited to the countries studied by Hofstede.

Practical implications

Bribery is less a cultural phenomenon; instead, it is bred in poverty and illustrative of business behavior occurring in a highly regulated and inward‐looking economy. As a country prospers and the domestic operating environment becomes more hygienic, it will have a salutary effect on the international behavior of the firms based in that country.

Originality/value

The study mediates the debate between cultural and economic determinism and provides empirical evidence that bribe‐giving is largely an expression of economic imperatives and not cultural predisposition.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 28 November 2017

Aylin Akpınar

Gender analysis of the narratives of low-income divorcées in big cities of Ankara, Istanbul and Izmir shows that their lives are under patriarchal domination. Women are…

Abstract

Gender analysis of the narratives of low-income divorcées in big cities of Ankara, Istanbul and Izmir shows that their lives are under patriarchal domination. Women are subjected to all kinds of violence in their marriage and escape it by getting a divorce. Their lives are vulnerable as the increasing numbers of lone mothers are neither morally nor socially accepted in Turkish society. The patriarchal family ideal exacerbates the situation of lone mothers who become stigmatized as divorcées. Divorce is considered a ‘shame’ for women, and the ideology of family is used as a political tool where persistent conservative bias ignores wife battering, rape and other types of abuse in society.

Details

Global Currents in Gender and Feminisms
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-484-2

Keywords

1 – 5 of 5