Search results

1 – 8 of 8
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 September 2020

Tuija Muhonen and Hanne Berthelsen

The aim of the current interview study was to investigate how the university staff and their immediate managers perceived the academic work environment after a transition…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the current interview study was to investigate how the university staff and their immediate managers perceived the academic work environment after a transition to activity-based workplaces (ABW).

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews were conducted with 11 university lecturers/researchers and 12 academic middle managers, that is, heads of departments or units in a Swedish university.

Findings

The qualitative content analysis revealed four central themes indicating how the academic environment had been affected: challenges related to decision-making and implementation of ABW, interpersonal relations and communication, consequences for academic identity and issues related to the physical work environment.

Research limitations/implications

The non-purposive sampling of participants coming from a single university is a limitation of the current study. More studies are needed to deepen the knowledge and to further corroborate the transferability of the findings.

Practical implications

The savings the universities expect to achieve in terms of reduced costs for premises, when introducing ABW, may lead to other kinds of costs, such as jeopardizing employee performance, comfort and well-being. It is therefore important that the academic staff is empowered and involved during the planning and implementation process of new offices.

Originality/value

The study contributes new knowledge concerning implementation of ABW and its consequences for the academic work environment.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Tuija Muhonen, Sandra Jönsson and Martin Bäckström

The purpose of this paper is to explore health- and work-related outcomes of cyberbullying behaviour and the potential mediating role of social organisational climate…

Downloads
6449

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore health- and work-related outcomes of cyberbullying behaviour and the potential mediating role of social organisational climate, social support from colleagues and social support from superiors.

Design/methodology/approach

Altogether 3,371 respondents participated in a questionnaire study.

Findings

The results of this study indicate that social organisational climate can have a mediating role in the relationship between cyberbullying behaviour and health, well-being, work engagement and intention to quit. Contrary to earlier face-to-face bullying research, the current study showed that cyberbullying behaviour had stronger indirect than direct relationships to health, well-being, work engagement and intention to quit.

Practical implications

Communication through digital devices in work life is becoming more prevalent, which in turn increases the risk for cyberbullying behaviour. Organisations need therefore to develop occupational health and safety policies concerning the use of digital communication and social media in order to prevent cyberbullying behaviour and its negative consequences.

Originality/value

Cyberbullying behaviour among working adults is a relatively unexplored phenomenon and therefore this study makes valuable contribution to the research field.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 November 2018

Hanne Berthelsen, Tuija Muhonen and Susanna Toivanen

There is an increased interest for introducing activity-based offices at universities. The purpose of this study is to contribute to the knowledge about the importance of…

Abstract

Purpose

There is an increased interest for introducing activity-based offices at universities. The purpose of this study is to contribute to the knowledge about the importance of the built environment for the psychosocial work environment within academia by analyzing how staff at a large Swedish university experienced the physical and psychosocial work environment before and after moving to activity-based offices.

Design/methodology/approach

A Web-based survey was distributed to all employees at two faculties at a university three months before (2015, n = 217, response rate 51 per cent) and nine months after (2016, n = 200, response rate 47 per cent) relocation to a new activity-based university building.

Findings

In the new premises, a vast majority (86 per cent) always occupied the same place when possible, and worked also more often from home. The social community at work had declined and social support from colleagues and supervisors was perceived to have decreased. The participants reported a lower job satisfaction after the relocation and were more likely to seek new jobs. No aspects in the physical or psychosocial work environment were found to have improved after the relocation.

Research/limitations implications

The study had a two-wave cross-sectional design, which does not allow establishing causal relations.

Practical implications

There is reason to be cautious about relocation to activity-based offices at universities. The potential savings in costs for premises may lead to may be followed by an increase in other costs. The risk that staff cannot concentrate on their work in activity-based university workplaces and lose their sense of community with colleagues are factors, which in the long run may lead to decreased efficiency, more conflicts and poorer well-being.

Originality/value

This paper contributes with new knowledge concerning changes in the physical and psychosocial work environment when relocating from cell offices to activity-based offices in a university setting.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Tuija Muhonen

The purpose of this paper is to examine subjective health among women managers and professionals during their careers. Further, the role of work locus of control (WLC) for…

Downloads
1111

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine subjective health among women managers and professionals during their careers. Further, the role of work locus of control (WLC) for women managers' health is analyzed in a longitudinal perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a follow‐up study among 38 women managers and professionals who participated in an earlier investigation in 1996. Data were collected by means of interviews and two short questionnaires.

Findings

The results of the analysis showed that nine women had maintained their health during their career, whereas others had various health problems and some women had also suffered from burnout syndrome. There was no significant change in WLC between the two investigations. The healthy women were characterized by stability in their WLC beliefs, rather than externality or internality.

Research limitations/implications

Even though the results are based on a limited number of participants, the study points out factors that can be crucial for women managers' and professionals' health. Further research is needed to corroborate the findings in the study.

Originality/value

The paper contributes further understanding of factors that are important for professional women's health. It also suggests that the role of WLC beliefs for health might be more complex than the internal‐external dimension.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

Tuija Muhonen

The purpose of this paper is to examine the prevalence of gender harassment and how it is related to different organisational factors, ill-health and job satisfaction…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the prevalence of gender harassment and how it is related to different organisational factors, ill-health and job satisfaction among women and men working as university teachers and researchers.

Design/methodology/approach

A web questionnaire was conducted in a university college in South Sweden. The final sample consisted of 322 participants, 186 women and 136 men.

Findings

The results showed that gender harassment was more prevalent among women than men, and among senior lecturers and professors than lecturers. Gender harassment was associated with high job demands, less fair leadership style of the immediate manager and job dissatisfaction for both women and men. For women, there was also an association between gender harassment, ill-health and gender of the immediate manager. For men, poorer social organisational climate was related to gender harassment, but contrary to women, gender harassment was not related to the gender of the immediate manager.

Research limitations/implications

Even though the research was conducted only in one university, the results imply that gender harassment can have negative consequences for teachers and researchers. As the immediate manager’s leadership style seems to be associated with the occurrence of gender harassment, universities should take this into consideration in their leadership programs.

Originality/value

The paper highlights gender harassment, a subtle form of sexual harassment, among university teachers and researchers.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Tuija Muhonen, Sandra Jönsson, Leif Denti and Kan Chen

The purpose of this paper is to examine the direct effects of empowering and employee-centered leadership on well-being, and the indirect or mediating role of social…

Downloads
1531

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the direct effects of empowering and employee-centered leadership on well-being, and the indirect or mediating role of social organizational climate between leadership behavior and well-being in a cross-cultural perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were distributed in two furniture retail stores in Sweden and two stores in China belonging to the same company. The final sample consisted of 483 participants from the Chinese and 254 participants from the Swedish stores.

Findings

The results of the structural equation modeling showed that there was no direct effect between leadership behavior (employee-centered leadership and empowering leadership) and well-being in either the Swedish or the Chinese sample. Further, the findings of the study indicate that social climate mediates the relationship between leadership behavior and employee well-being, but this seems to be culturally contingent. The mediating effect is prevalent in a culture that has been considered as having a collective orientation and where the power distance is high.

Research limitations/implications

Despite some methodological limitations such as the cross-sectional design and problems with acquiescence in responses, the results indicate the complexity of the role of culture in organizational behavior.

Practical implications

Managers working in increasingly globalized contexts need to take into consideration that some organizational behaviors gradually become more universal, whereas others remain culturally contingent.

Originality/value

The paper illustrates the complex relationship between leadership behavior, social climate, and employee well-being in the same corporate culture, but in different cultural settings.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 32 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 April 2014

Sandra Jönsson, Tuija Muhonen, Christina Scholten and Anders S. Wigerfelt

The purpose of this paper is to discuss and problematise how leadership and employees, or “employeeship”, are constructed within IKEA, a global firm often associated with…

Downloads
1629

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss and problematise how leadership and employees, or “employeeship”, are constructed within IKEA, a global firm often associated with national identity, and connected to distinct values and a leadership ideal. From a critical management perspective, the authors' intent was to study whether there were hierarchies and polarisations in constructions of leadership and, if so, how they were manifested.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical material consists of 17 interviews with Swedish and non-Swedish managers at the senior management level and internal documents.

Findings

The analysis of the empirical material supports the finding that employees are constructed in superior vs subordinate positions based on beliefs about nationality (ethnicity), wherein the construction of Swedishness is ranked above other nationalities. Based on these constructions, two different dimensions of a leader emerge. The first dimension is one of leading and supporting, which involves personal development and is regarded as something positive. The second dimension involves being a manager, which is perceived as conservative, dreary and unappealing.

Originality/value

The study illustrates how leaders in a global firm construct hierarchies and polarisation in the daily work.

Details

Cross Cultural Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Christina Scholten and Hope Witmer

This paper aims to reveal gendered leadership constructs that hinder a competency-based view of leadership in Swedish-based global companies and the implications for…

Downloads
4660

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to reveal gendered leadership constructs that hinder a competency-based view of leadership in Swedish-based global companies and the implications for leadership recruitment and development to top management positions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on qualitative semi-structured interviews, which have been analyzed using a gender analytic framework to identify how senior management, Human resource management and leadership trainees are discussing leadership and career development.

Findings

Three themes were identified as clouding the issue of gender-equal leadership practices thereby creating an opaque gendered lens of who is defined as eligible for leadership positions. The three themes were: symbols as gendered images, counting heads – preserving the existing system and illusive gender inclusion.

Research limitations/implications

Recruitment practices were identified as contributors to homosocial practices that perpetuate male-dominated leadership representation. However, specific recruitment practices were not fully explored.

Practical implications

The potential use of gender equality as a sustainable management practice for competitive organizations to recruit and develop talented people.

Social implications

To create resilient and gender-equal recruitment and leadership development practices.

Originality/value

This research offers an original perspective on gender representation at the senior management level in global companies by revealing gendered leadership constructs in the leadership recruitment and development process as antecedents to unequal gender representation in senior management positions.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

1 – 8 of 8