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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2017

Tuğba Özbölük and Yunus Dursun

This paper aims to investigate the different types of members based on their roles within an online brand community dedicated to Apple.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the different types of members based on their roles within an online brand community dedicated to Apple.

Design/methodology/approach

Design/methodology/approach Data are drawn from an 18-month netnographic study, including participant and non-participant observation.

Findings

Findings reveal that members of the online brand community share a common goal but they are heterogeneous in many respects. In this research, five different types of brand community members are identified: learner, pragmatist, activist, opinion leader and evangelist. These findings emphasize the heterogeneity of the brand community or the differences of members and subgroups they form in the community.

Practical implications

This paper offers some insights for brand managers. There are different sub-tribes in online brand communities and these sub-tribes develop their own meanings of the brand. This means that online brand communities do not form one single homogenous target group and can be segmented into subgroups. Findings also offer a deeper understanding of negative characteristics of online brand community members. The role “activist” found in this study may be crucial for marketers, as activists can represent the negative side of online brand communities.

Originality/value

The literature on brand communities has focused predominantly on the homogeneity of these communities. This paper extends the literature by demonstrating the heterogeneity in an online brand community. The paper contributes to the brand community literature by substantiating that online brand community members can be segmented into subgroups based on their roles within the community. In addition, the paper extends the existing literature on brand communities that has overlooked the destructive consumer roles.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 December 2022

Zerrin Karakavak and Tuğba Özbölük

This study aims to examine the functions of hijab fashion among hijab-wearing women and explore the role of social media and influencers in hijab fashion.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the functions of hijab fashion among hijab-wearing women and explore the role of social media and influencers in hijab fashion.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted in-depth interviews with 29 hijab-wearing women in Turkey. The authors collected data in June–November 2020.

Findings

Findings show that hijab fashion functions as encouragement, attraction, modesty and social image among Turkish Muslim women. This study also shows that social media and influencers change the meaning of the hijab while promoting hijab fashion. Findings reveal that Instagram boutiques act as digital fashion magazines, which enable women to integrate faster into popular culture today. While influencers have increased the number of hijab-wearing women, they have also turned the hijab into a commodity in the market by degenerating its true meaning.

Research limitations/implications

This study has several limitations regarding the sample and geographic context of consumers. This study may not represent Turkish Muslim women’s behavior as our sample consists of 29 women. Therefore, larger samples are needed to generalize our findings. Undertaking cross-cultural studies will also enable marketers to make cultural comparisons.

Practical implications

This study offers some insights for Islamic marketing practitioners in terms of influencer using in hijab fashion.

Originality/value

This study adds to the previous research on hijab fashion and hijab consumption on Instagram. This study also extends the previous literature by examining the role of social media and influencers in hijab fashion. Findings revealed that the hijab is gradually losing its spiritual value by becoming a commodity packaged and marketed through Instagram and influencers.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 July 2017

David Taylor and Iryna Pentina

460

Abstract

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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