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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Zhi-Hua Hu, Chen Wei and Xiao-Kun Yu

The purpose of this paper is to study the problem of a routing problem with uncertain try-on service time (VRPUS) for apparel distribution, and to devise solution…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the problem of a routing problem with uncertain try-on service time (VRPUS) for apparel distribution, and to devise solution strategies coping with the uncertainty by an evolutionary algorithm. VRPUS belongs to the category of practical routing models integrated with uncertain service times. However, in the background of apparel distribution, it has distinct features. The try-on service will improve the customer satisfaction by providing experiences to customers; the return cost is saved; the customer loyalty is improved for experiencing face-to-face try-on services. However, the uncertainty of try-on service time makes the apparel distribution process uncertain and incurs additional risk management cost, such that the logistics companies should optimally make decisions on the choice of the service and the service processes.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper devised a mixed-integer programming (MIP) model for the base vehicle routing problem (VRP) and then it is extended to support the solution strategies for uncertain try-on times. A try-on time estimation parameter and a time reservation parameter are used to cope with the uncertain try-on time, and the try-on rejection strategy is applied when the uncertain try-on time is realized at customer and no surplus time can be used for try-on service besides distributing to remainder customers. Due to the computational complexity of VRPUS, an evolutionary algorithm is designed for solving it. These parameters and strategy options are designed for the operational decisions by logistics companies. Finally, a decision support system (DSS) is designed.

Findings

Five experimental scenarios are performed to reveal the impacts of parameters and solution strategies coping with uncertain try-on time on the distribution cost, return cost, and the try-on service failure. The tuning methods are designed to assist the decisions by logistics companies.

Originality/value

A new routing problem is addressed for apparel distribution in fashion industry especially in the context of booming apparel e-commerce, which is a VRP with uncertain try-on service time for apparel distribution; three strategies are developed to cope with the try-on time uncertainty. The proposed method is also a theoretical base for designing a practical DSS for logistics companies to provide try-on service to customers.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2019

Tseng-Lung Huang, Shane Mathews and Cindy Yunhsin Chou

The purpose of this study is to draws on self-determination and self-evaluation theories to examine the psychological factors impacted by augmented reality (AR) services

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to draws on self-determination and self-evaluation theories to examine the psychological factors impacted by augmented reality (AR) services, an augmented reality try-on system. This study highlights three characteristics of modality, synchronous sense or ownership and re-processability within an AR try-on experiences as well as the moderating effects of consumers’ body surveillance and fashion consciousness.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a scenario survey approach, this study designs characteristics of an AR try-on system to examine the research model and the hypotheses. A total of 207 responses are collected and analysed using the SmartPLS 3 statistical software.

Findings

The results show that modality, synchronous sense of ownership control and re-processability of AR try-on system positively affect consumer’s rapport experience. Both body surveillance and fashion consciousness significantly moderate the effects of AR try-on service system characteristics on consumer rapport experience.

Research limitations/implications

This study highlights the importance of understanding the implications of the evolution of cyborg consumerism where consumer technology interface systems such as AR, as a source of technologically mediated modality, become part of the consumer’s body, an extension of their body if you will.

Practical implications

Based on the study findings, marketing managers can understand how to better use AR to implement digital promotional strategies for various body-involvement products.

Originality/value

Using immersive technologies, this study shows that AR allows a consumer see an authentic self and tangible extension of their physical self in an online shopping setting, thus enhancing a consumer’s online shopping experience.

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2019

Hyo Kyung Song, Eunsoo Baek and Ho Jung Choo

The purpose of this paper is to understand how augmented reality (AR) try-on experiences facilitate consumers’ shopping decision. Focusing on the immersion and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand how augmented reality (AR) try-on experiences facilitate consumers’ shopping decision. Focusing on the immersion and psychological ownership, the study investigated how the properties of AR experiences (environmental embedding (EE) and simulated physical control (SPC)) affect decision comfort.

Design/methodology/approach

This research theoretically and empirically analyzes how each property of AR experiences affects consequential psychological states and then further increases decision comfort by employing an existing AR try-on mobile application. A total of 99 valid responses were used for the partial least square structural equation modeling analysis. One’s prior AR try-on experience was predicted as a moderator and analyzed using SPSS-based PROCESS macro.

Findings

The results demonstrated that EE and SPC evoke immersion and the feeling of ownership of a virtual product, which increased decision comfort. The moderating effect of one’s prior AR try-on experience showed that the impact of EE and SPC on immersion was attenuated for those with prior experience. Further, immersion mediated the effect of EE but SPC on the feeling of ownership, which corroborated the direct effect of SPC on the feeling of ownership.

Practical implications

Firms must consider technological and user-experience features that can induce users to perceive high levels of AR characteristics such as EE and SPC. Practitioners should develop realistic content that can correctly place virtual products on users to enhance EE. Including more interactive features is encouraged to provide users with a feeling of control toward the virtual product that directly leads to ownership and positively affects decision making. Further, practitioners need to be cautious about consumers getting used to the new technology; retailers and marketers need to focus on creating new and innovative content to continually engage customers.

Originality/value

This study adopted EE and SPC to determine how each property of AR experience forms the consequential psychological states, particularly depending on one’s prior experience. Methodologically, the study provided external validity in conducting an experiment by adopting an existing AR mobile application available in the market and employing an objective measure of respondents (e.g. prior AR try-on experience).

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2018

Qiong Tao and Yingjiao Xu

Fashion subscription service is a newly emerged retailing model that provides an innovative way of shopping to meet consumers’ fashion needs. From the perspective of…

Abstract

Purpose

Fashion subscription service is a newly emerged retailing model that provides an innovative way of shopping to meet consumers’ fashion needs. From the perspective of innovation adoption, the purpose of this paper is to provide an insight of consumers’ perceptions as well as adoption intention of this innovative retailing format.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is qualitative in nature, utilizing focus group study approach. In this paper, content analysis was applied to analyze the data.

Findings

While possessing varying degrees of knowledge about fashion subscription retailing, the participants shared the following perceptions of relative advantages, including convenience, personalization, consumer excitement, opportunities to try new styles, and opportunity to better manage their apparel budget. Concerns mainly focused on missing social shopping experiences and the hassle in the cancellation process. The overall adoption intention was high.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the nature of this research, the sample size was limited and results may not be generalized. This research paid less attention to individual differences, in terms of demographic and psychographic characteristics.

Practical implications

Future marketing could focus more on educating consumers about the attributes of the services they provide. Retailers can strategically leverage the positively perceived advantages in their marketing communications to enhance consumers’ adoption intention of their services.

Originality/value

The paper fills a gap in the literature on consumer behavior toward fashion subscription retailing and sheds light for companies in their endeavors to excel in this new retailing venue.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2019

Apiradee Wongkitrungrueng, Krittinee Nuttavuthisit, Teodora Szabo-Douat and Sankar Sen

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of customer deference to service providers in service encounters, and articulate its chief antecedents, experiences and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the nature of customer deference to service providers in service encounters, and articulate its chief antecedents, experiences and consequences.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected in Thailand, using critical incident technique. A total of 253 subjects share their experiences of being “deferential” (i.e. “kreng-jai” in Thailand) during everyday service encounters.

Findings

The findings indicate that in cultures in which the cultural norm (i.e. kreng-jai) is to be considerate of others, customers often become deferential of the service provider during service encounters, especially when customers perceive that the service provider’s well-being is compromised. However, customer deference involves aversive feelings which lead customers to devise coping strategies and avoid future contact with a company.

Research limitations/implications

Using a specific cultural norm, the findings challenge prior finding that people from collectivist culture are more likely to tolerate and be satisfied with service encounters, and document the role of previously unexamined customer-related factors in driving satisfaction in ordinary service encounters.

Practical implications

The findings recommend service providers to preempt customers’ deference by establishing and communicating the role and acceptable behaviors, managing physical distance with customers, and monitoring customer non-verbal behavior and facial expressions to detect the customers’ true feelings.

Originality/value

No prior research has comprehensively examined the phenomenon whereby consumers seek to benefit service providers at the expense of their own well-being. This study demonstrates that customer deference degrades customer satisfaction even in ordinary service encounters.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2021

Chin-Ching Yin, Yi-Ching Hsieh, Hung-Chang Chiu and Jhih-Ling Yu

The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, this study applies social presence theory to explore the influences of public self-awareness on consumers’ choice…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, this study applies social presence theory to explore the influences of public self-awareness on consumers’ choice inconsistency and post-choice satisfaction. Second, the authors investigate how time pressure moderates the effects of self-awareness on choice inconsistency and post-choice satisfaction so that online sellers can better align their marketing strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

This research consists of two studies. Study 1 conducted a 3 (self-awareness: public/private/control) × 2 (time pressure: high/none) experiment, and 311 online participants were recruited to explore the influence of public self-awareness and time pressure. Study 2 used a 3 (self-awareness: public/private/control) × 2 (time pressure: high/no) × 2 (self-consciousness: high/low) quasi-experiments, and the authors used 652 online participants to examine the effect of self-awareness, time pressure and public self-consciousness on choice inconsistency and post-choice satisfaction.

Findings

The results indicate that publicly self-aware consumers under high time pressure show greater inconsistency than those under no time pressure. Also, people with higher public self-consciousness exhibited higher choice inconsistency and post-choice satisfaction in public self-awareness situations than those in private self-awareness and control conditions.

Research limitations/implications

To generalize the results, this study should be replicated using more heterogeneous populations in diverse regions and cultures, as well as other product categories.

Practical implications

This study explores the implications of evoking self-awareness during online consumption and the online purchase process by observing the moderating effect of self-consciousness and time pressure. The findings provide insights to marketing practitioners who seek to increase their companies’ competitive advantage and profits through effective online manipulations of consumers’ self-awareness.

Originality/value

Extant research does not address how time pressure affects the relationships among public self-awareness, choice inconsistency and post-choice satisfaction. In addition, prior research only focused on public self-awareness in customer consumption. This study bridges these gaps and has implications for e-commerce, consumer behavior and relationship marketing research fields.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2021

Tianyu Cui, Veena Chattaraman and Lushan Sun

This study adopted the functional, expressive and aesthetic (FEA) consumer needs model, aimed to examine the influence of consumers' FEA perceptions of three-dimensional…

Abstract

Purpose

This study adopted the functional, expressive and aesthetic (FEA) consumer needs model, aimed to examine the influence of consumers' FEA perceptions of three-dimensional printing (3DP) integrated apparel products on their product satisfaction and purchase intention.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was employed with a sample of 332 participants (165 female and 167 male) aged 19 to 76, mean age of 35 years. A gender-neutral, 3DP integrated hooded sweatshirt was developed for this study featuring flexible, white 3D printed insets fabricated with an FDM 3D printer and white TPU filament sewn with traditional gray knit fleece.

Findings

The findings of this study suggest that the FEA model is appropriate in predicting consumers' satisfaction with 3DP integrated apparel products. Specifically, aesthetic (perceived beauty) and expressive (perceived coolness) dimensions are more influential than functional factors, except for the positive influence of perceived fit, in predicting consumers' satisfaction and purchase intentions for 3DP integrated apparel products.

Research limitations/implications

Future studies could consider data collection from participants' physical fit testing or try on evaluation to determine the importance of the functional dimension in consumer response to 3DP integrated apparel product. Future studies could also examine full 3D printed apparel, or other 3DP integrated wearable products to expand the understanding of consumer perception of the application of 3DP technology.

Originality/value

Despite the increasing exploration of 3DP integrated apparel products and industry attempts to make this innovation in apparel more mainstream, research on how mainstream consumers perceive such 3DP integrated apparel products is limited. This study addresses this gap, providing critical implications for future research and design.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Ruth Townsley, Debby Watson and David Abbott

Recent government policies in relation to children stress the importance of service integration and partnership working, with particular emphasis on combating social…

Abstract

Recent government policies in relation to children stress the importance of service integration and partnership working, with particular emphasis on combating social exclusion. With reference to findings from a three‐year empirical study, this article examines some key elements of the process of multi‐agency working in services for disabled children with complex health care needs. It highlights some of the barriers to effective partnerships and lists some pointers for policy and practice.

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2011

Olga Godlevskaja, Jos van Iwaarden and Ton van der Wiele

This paper aims to propose a framework that can be used for analysing services in the automotive industry.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose a framework that can be used for analysing services in the automotive industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Existing categorisation schemes for services are investigated and evaluated in terms of their applicability to services in the automotive industry.

Findings

Services categorisation schemes are grouped under eight service paradigms, expressing the understanding that various authors had about services in different times and contexts.

Research limitations/implications

The remarks are limited to the automotive industry.

Practical implications

The paper suggests services classification schemes, which can be effectively applied to automotive services in order to generate valuable managerial insights.

Originality/value

This paper provides an overview over multiple services categorisation schemes existing in the literature.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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