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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2021

Inam Ul Haq, Usman Raja, Imtiaz Alam, Dirk De Clercq and Sharjeel Saleem

With a foundation in social exchange theory, this study examines the relationship between servant leadership and three types of workplace mistreatment – bullying…

Abstract

Purpose

With a foundation in social exchange theory, this study examines the relationship between servant leadership and three types of workplace mistreatment – bullying, incivility and ostracism – while also considering a mediating role of trust in the leader and a moderating role of the ethical climate.

Design/methodology/approach

Three time-lagged sets of data (N = 431) were collected among employees working in various sectors.

Findings

Servant leadership relates significantly to trust in the leader, as well as to workplace bullying, incivility and ostracism. In turn, trust in the leader mediates the relationship between servant leadership and all three types of workplace mistreatment. The results also indicate the presence of moderated mediation, in that the indirect effect of servant leadership on workplace mistreatment is moderated by the ethical climate.

Originality/value

This study adds to extant research by examining the mediating mechanism of trust in leaders with servant leadership and workplace mistreatment, along with interactive effects of ethical climate.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Book part
Publication date: 8 December 2016

Benjamin Kutsyuruba and Keith D. Walker

It is well known that trust is an essential, yet a fragile part of organizational life. Because trust sometimes has to be placed without guarantees, it will inevitably be…

Abstract

It is well known that trust is an essential, yet a fragile part of organizational life. Because trust sometimes has to be placed without guarantees, it will inevitably be broken, violated, and damaged when parties involved in trustworthy relationships let others down. When trust-destroying events occur, trust is shattered and its level plummets quickly into the domain of distrust. The speed with which trust can be destroyed depends on the magnitude of damage from the act of untrustworthiness and the perceived intentionality of the untrustworthiness. Moreover, if seen as intentional, the destruction of trust is particularly severe, as intentional untrustworthiness reveals malevolent intentions that are seen as highly predictive of future untrustworthiness. Often, leaders are the ones responsible for improper handling of, destroying, or violating trust in their organizations. In this chapter, we explore the consequences of leaders for violating trust and examine how trust changes over time as a function of different types of violations and attempts at restoration. We argue that because distrust may irrevocably harm organizations, leaders as moral agents need to consciously work to rebuild relationships, restore broken trust, and instill hope.

Details

The Dark Side of Leadership: Identifying and Overcoming Unethical Practice in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-499-0

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Article
Publication date: 29 January 2021

Yan Bao, Ping Han, Shudi Liao and Jianqiao Liao

Based on the social exchange theory, this study explores the mechanism of leader–subordinate power distance orientation (PDO) congruence with employees' taking charge…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on the social exchange theory, this study explores the mechanism of leader–subordinate power distance orientation (PDO) congruence with employees' taking charge behavior (TCB) and also verifies the moderated mediation effect of employees' promotion regulatory focus (PROM-F) on leader–subordinate PDO congruence and on employees' TCB through trust in the leader (which is the mediator).

Design/methodology/approach

Based on 296 questionnaires from 46 teams of Chinese enterprises, the authors use cross-level polynomial regressions and response surface techniques to analyze the effect of leader–subordinate PDO congruence on employees' TCB and use the block variable technique to test the mediating effect of trust in the leader.

Findings

(1) When leader–subordinates' PDO is congruent, the leader–subordinate low-low PDO matching pattern leads to more employees' TCB than the leader–subordinate high-high PDO matching pattern. (2) When leader–subordinate PDO is incongruent, the leader–subordinate low–high PDO matching pattern will lead to more TCB than the high-low PDO pattern.

Practical implications

(1) Encourage and promote the development of diverse cultures in enterprises. (2) Respect the power and status of employees and encourage a low-PDO leadership style. (3) Increase credibility by developing and establishing a good corporate leader image.

Originality/value

(1) The unique background of this survey offers important cross-cultural information on the effects of leader–subordinate PDO congruence. (2) The results of this research enrich the theoretical understanding of the factors that influence TCB. (3) Reveal the internal mechanisms of CPD congruence with TCB and demonstrate an indirect effect of trust in leader. (4) The discussion of the moderating role of employee's PROM-F will also deepen the understanding of the exchange relationship between leaders and subordinates.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 7 December 2020

Ole Kristian Sandnes Håvold, Jon Ivar Håvold and Richard Glavee-Geo

To investigate the relationship between trust in leaders and work satisfaction on work engagement in public hospitals.

Abstract

Purpose

To investigate the relationship between trust in leaders and work satisfaction on work engagement in public hospitals.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 137 employees working in two medium-sized public hospitals. A model based on a review of the literature was developed and tested using variance-based structural equation technique.

Findings

Work engagement is significantly influenced by trust in leaders and work satisfaction. Work satisfaction partially mediates the relationship between trust in leaders and work engagement. Furthermore, personal development, affiliation and belonging and basic needs for job fulfilment significantly influence work satisfaction. Likewise, basic needs for job fulfilment and co-workers' empathy significantly influence trust in leaders.

Practical implications

This study indicates that in public hospitals satisfaction and trust in a leader have a substantial influence on work engagement, highlighting the importance of a good trust relationship in the workplace. It is also important for leaders to understand that increased work engagement leads to a well-motivated workforce, improved work performance, low absence from work due to sick leave and a good patient experience.

Originality/value

Not much research has been done on the direct effects of trust and satisfaction on engagement. Moreover, the study contributes to the existing literature through the development and testing of the “work engagement model”.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

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Article
Publication date: 27 October 2020

Sari Kristiina Hirvi, Sanna Laulainen and Helena Taskinen

The purpose of this study is to address the construction of trust in leader member exchange (LMX) relationships as a multidimensional phenomenon and identify the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to address the construction of trust in leader member exchange (LMX) relationships as a multidimensional phenomenon and identify the importance of emotional and collective factors contributing to this phenomenon.

Design/methodology/approach

Ten health care professionals (five leaders and five members) were interviewed to subject to qualitative thematic analysis.

Findings

Four main themes in the data were identified (work roles, collectivity, interaction and participation) and linked to two main elements of LMX trust relations: core and contextual. The results extend understanding of the construction and maintenance of trust in LMX relationships, indicating that it is a more complex and socially constructed phenomenon than previously described.

Research limitations/implications

Despite identified limitations of the study (the small amount of empirical material, interpretive research method and purposive sampling of participants), the findings reveal that constructing trust in LMX relationships is more multidimensional than generally portrayed in traditional LMX theory and its three-stage continuum. This study suggests that a broader perspective should be adopted in LMX research, treating it not only as a collective phenomenon but also considering leaders and members as emotional individuals.

Practical implications

Understanding the multidimensional nature of LMX relationships is helpful for developing interpersonal relationships in organizations and leadership practices through recognition of the importance of the transparency, practices and adequacy of mutual interaction. The results presented here may contribute to such understanding and help leaders to relate to members as both subjective individuals and parts of a complex social network. The results may also increase members' awareness of possible ways that they can promote the development of good LMX relationships in organizations.

Originality/value

The novelty of the study relates to the identification of the collective, emotional and multidimensional nature of LMX relationships.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 February 2020

Martijn Hendriks, Martijn Burger, Antoinette Rijsenbilt, Emma Pleeging and Harry Commandeur

The purpose of this paper is to examine how a supervisor’s virtuous leadership as perceived by subordinates influences subordinates’ work-related well-being and to examine…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how a supervisor’s virtuous leadership as perceived by subordinates influences subordinates’ work-related well-being and to examine the mediating role of trust in the leader and the moderating roles of individual leader virtues and various characteristics of subordinates and organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted through Prolific among a self-selected sample of 1,237 employees who worked with an immediate supervisor across various industries in primarily the UK and the USA. Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The empirical results indicate that an immediate supervisor’s virtuous leadership as evaluated by the subordinate positively influences all three considered dimensions of work-related well-being – job satisfaction, work-related affect and work engagement – for a wide variety of employees in different industries and countries. A subordinate’s greater trust in the supervisor fully mediates this positive influence for job satisfaction and work engagement and partially for work-related affect. All five individual core leader virtues – prudence, temperance, justice, courage and humanity – positively influence work-related well-being.

Practical implications

The findings underscore that promoting virtuous leadership is a promising pathway for improved employee well-being, which may ultimately benefit individual and organizational performance.

Originality/value

Despite an age-old interest in leader virtues, the lack of consensus on the defining elements of virtuous leadership has limited the understanding of its consequences. Building on recent advances in the conceptualization and measurement of virtuous leadership and leader character, this paper addresses this void by exploring how virtuous leadership relates to employees’ well-being and trust.

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2020

Ibeawuchi K. Enwereuzor, Busayo A. Adeyemi and Ike E. Onyishi

Although a great number of studies have established the important role of leadership in workplace safety, it appears researchers are yet to consider the role that trust in

Abstract

Purpose

Although a great number of studies have established the important role of leadership in workplace safety, it appears researchers are yet to consider the role that trust in leaders could play between ethical leadership and safety compliance within healthcare. To address that imbalance, this study aims to investigate the relationship between ethical leadership and safety compliance, with trust in the leader as the mediator.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected in three time periods from 237 hospital staff nurses (76.8 per cent women and 23.2 per cent men). Ordinary least squares regression-based path analysis using PROCESS for statistical package for the social sciences (SPSS) macro was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Results showed that ethical leadership was positively related to trust in a leader but was not related to safety compliance. In addition, trust in leader was positively related to safety compliance and also mediated the positive relationship between ethical leadership and safety compliance.

Research limitations/implications

The data were collected within healthcare organisations in a few localities in Nigeria, making it difficult to generalise the findings beyond the current sample let alone the entire country or even continent.

Practical implications

The findings imply that ethical leadership may not be directly effective in improving the safety compliance of subordinate nurses unless such a leader first develops a trust-based relationship with the subordinates.

Originality/value

The current study builds on and extends the burgeoning research in the area of leadership and employee outcome by investigating not only the direct relationship between ethical leadership and safety compliance but also incorporating trust in a leader as a mediator of this relationship.

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Article
Publication date: 16 December 2019

Zhu Yao, Xianchun Zhang, Zhenxuan Liu, Lili Zhang and Jinlian Luo

This study aims to investigate the impact of narcissistic leadership on employee voice behavior from the perspective of job stress, trust in leaders and traditionality in China.

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1270

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the impact of narcissistic leadership on employee voice behavior from the perspective of job stress, trust in leaders and traditionality in China.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a survey on 437 employees to assess their narcissistic leadership in Time 1. In Time 2, they measured their job stress, trust in leaders and traditionality. In Time 3, they assessed the voice behavior of these employees.

Findings

Narcissistic leadership correlates positively with employees’ job stress, which mediates between narcissistic leadership and employee voice behavior. Trust in leaders negatively moderates the correlation between job stress and employee voice behavior, as well as moderates the mediation effect of job stress on the correlation between narcissistic leadership and employee voice behavior. In addition, traditionality positively moderates the correlation between job stress and employee voice behavior, as well as moderates the mediation effect of job stress on the correlation between narcissistic leadership and employee voice behavior.

Originality/value

This study establishes the impact of narcissistic leadership on employee behavior from the perspective of job stress, trust in leaders and traditionality.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Simon C.H. Chan and Wai-ming Mak

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between servant leadership, subordinates' trust in leader and job satisfaction, and whether subordinates'…

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7481

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between servant leadership, subordinates' trust in leader and job satisfaction, and whether subordinates' organizational tenure moderated the effect.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured questionnaire survey was used to collect data by 218 employees in a service-oriented private firm in the People's Republic of China.

Findings

The findings indicated that trust in leader mediated the relationship between servant leadership and subordinates' job satisfaction. Also, the positive effect of servant leadership on subordinates' trust in leader and job satisfaction was stronger for short-tenure subordinates than that for long-tenure subordinates.

Originality/value

This paper enriches the existing leadership literature and contributes to the research into how and why servant leadership may influence subordinates' attitudes.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 29 September 2010

Sen Sendjaya and Andre Pekerti

This study sets out to examine the impact of servant leadership (SL) on followers' trust in their leaders.

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16098

Abstract

Purpose

This study sets out to examine the impact of servant leadership (SL) on followers' trust in their leaders.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 555 employees of two educational institutions were obtained using measures of servant leadership behaviors and followers' trust in their leader.

Findings

Servant leadership is a significant predictor of trust with covenantal relationship, responsible morality and transforming influence as the key servant leadership behaviors significantly contributing to followers' trust in their leaders. Subordinates who perceived high servant leadership behavior in their leaders had significantly higher trust levels compared with those who perceived low servant leadership behavior in their leaders.

Research limitations/implications

While the relationship between leadership and trust has attracted scholarly interests for many years, the underlying process of how trust in the leader‐follower relationships is developed remains unknown. The current study addresses this gap in the literature by empirically testing the linkages between servant leadership behavior and followers' trust in their leaders.

Practical implications

The study suggested specific trust‐building behaviors in which leaders should continually engage: articulation of a shared vision, role‐modeling, demonstration of concern and respect for followers, and integrity‐infused decisions and actions.

Originality/value

The current study represents the first large‐scale attempt that empirically tests the linkages between servant leadership behavior and followers' trust in their leaders.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 31 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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