Search results

1 – 10 of over 5000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Jodyn Platt, Minakshi Raj and Sharon L.R. Kardia

Nations such as the USA are investing in technologies such as electronic health records in order to collect, store and transfer information across boundaries of health…

Abstract

Purpose

Nations such as the USA are investing in technologies such as electronic health records in order to collect, store and transfer information across boundaries of health care, public health and research. Health information brokers such as health care providers, public health departments and university researchers function as “access points” to manage relationships between the public and the health system. The relationship between the public and health information brokers is influenced by trust; and this relationship may predict the trust that the public has in the health system as a whole, which has implications for public trust in the system, and consequently, legitimacy of involved institutions, under circumstances of health information data sharing in the future. This paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, the authors aimed to examine characteristics of trustors (i.e. the public) that predict trust in health information brokers; and further, to identify the factors that influence trust in brokers that also predict system trust. The authors developed a survey that was administered to US respondents in 2014 using GfK’s nationally representative sample, with a final sample of 1,011 participants and conducted ordinary least squares regression for data analyses.

Findings

Results suggest that health care providers are the most trusted information brokers of those examined. Beliefs about medical deceptive behavior were negatively associated with trust in each of the information brokers examined; however, psychosocial factors were significantly associated with trust in brokers, suggesting that individual attitudes and beliefs are influential on trust in brokers. Positive views of information sharing and the expectation of benefits of information sharing for health outcomes and health care quality are associated with system trust.

Originality/value

This study suggests that demonstrating the benefits and value of information sharing could be beneficial for building public trust in the health system; however, trust in brokers of information are variable across the public; that is, knowledge, attitudes and beliefs are associated with the level of trust different individuals have in various health information brokers – suggesting that the need for a personalized approach to building trust.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 33 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Louise Lee

This paper aims to investigate the contribution of brokers to business non-profit collaborations, in the context of employee volunteering. It investigates the roles brokers

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the contribution of brokers to business non-profit collaborations, in the context of employee volunteering. It investigates the roles brokers play and ways they contribute to value creation within social alliances.

Design/methodology/approach

This research focusses on a case study of a UK employee volunteering broker programme run by a local volunteer centre. A combined qualitative methodology involved document analysis and interviews, with brokers and business, community and government partners involved in employee volunteering collaborations.

Findings

Brokers play three key roles in business non-profit collaboration as connectors, facilitators/co-designers and learning catalysts. These roles help stimulate manifestations of associational value, transferred resource value, interaction value and synergistic value.

Research limitations/implications

Results indicate brokers play an important part in nurturing conditions underpinning innovation and value co-creation, key characteristics of transformational forms of business non-profit collaboration. This study was based on a single case study. Future research could explore broker contributions within a variety of business non-profit settings.

Practical implications

For managers implementing business non-profit collaborations, this paper provides a framework depicting key broker roles and ways brokers enable collaborative value that may be useful when assessing whether to use the services of a broker.

Originality/value

This paper enriches the understanding of business non-profit collaboration and the role of individual actors in affecting value creation, an under-researched area in the social alliance literature. It provides a framework for assessing broker contributions in business non-profit collaborations.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Benjamin Kutsyuruba and Keith D. Walker

It is well known that trust is an essential, yet a fragile part of organizational life. Because trust sometimes has to be placed without guarantees, it will inevitably be…

Abstract

It is well known that trust is an essential, yet a fragile part of organizational life. Because trust sometimes has to be placed without guarantees, it will inevitably be broken, violated, and damaged when parties involved in trustworthy relationships let others down. When trust-destroying events occur, trust is shattered and its level plummets quickly into the domain of distrust. The speed with which trust can be destroyed depends on the magnitude of damage from the act of untrustworthiness and the perceived intentionality of the untrustworthiness. Moreover, if seen as intentional, the destruction of trust is particularly severe, as intentional untrustworthiness reveals malevolent intentions that are seen as highly predictive of future untrustworthiness. Often, leaders are the ones responsible for improper handling of, destroying, or violating trust in their organizations. In this chapter, we explore the consequences of leaders for violating trust and examine how trust changes over time as a function of different types of violations and attempts at restoration. We argue that because distrust may irrevocably harm organizations, leaders as moral agents need to consciously work to rebuild relationships, restore broken trust, and instill hope.

Details

The Dark Side of Leadership: Identifying and Overcoming Unethical Practice in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-499-0

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Barry Wray, Adrian Palmer and David Bejou

Conceptual arguments favouring a relational rather than a transactionalapproach to the study of buyer‐seller relationships are now wellunderstood. However, attempts to…

Abstract

Conceptual arguments favouring a relational rather than a transactional approach to the study of buyer‐seller relationships are now well understood. However, attempts to quantify the factors contributing towards relationship quality have been held back by the complexity of the underlying factors and their interrelatedness. Traditional regression techniques are not effective in analysing data with high levels of multi‐collinearity and missing information, typical in many studies of buyer behaviour. Makes use of a relatively new technique – neural network analysis – to try to quantify the factors contributing to buyer‐seller relationship quality. The technique uses a statistically‐based learning procedure modelled on the workings of the human brain which quantifies the relationship between input and output variables through an intermediate “hidden” variable level analogous to the brain. For this study, a neural network was developed with two outcome components of relationship quality (relationship satisfaction and trust), and five input antecedents (the salesperson′s sales orientation, customer orientation, expertise, ethics and the relationship′s duration). In a comparison of multiple regression and neural network techniques, the latter was found to give statistically more significant outcomes. New applications within marketing for neural network analysis are being found. Contributes towards the development of the technique and suggests a number of further possible applications.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 28 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

U.M. Mbanaso, G.S. Cooper, David Chadwick and Anne Anderson

This paper aims to describe a bilateral symmetric approach to authorization, privacy protection and obligation enforcement in distributed transactions. The authors…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe a bilateral symmetric approach to authorization, privacy protection and obligation enforcement in distributed transactions. The authors introduce the concept of the obligation of trust (OoT) protocol as a privacy assurance and authorization mechanism that is built upon the XACML standard. The OoT allows two communicating parties to dynamically exchange their privacy and authorization requirements and capabilities, which the authors term a notification of obligation (NoB), as well as their commitments to fulfilling each other's requirements, which the authors term signed acceptance of obligations (SAO). The authors seek to describe some applicability of these concepts and to show how they can be integrated into distributed authorization systems for stricter privacy and confidentiality control.

Design/methodology/approach

Existing access control and privacy protection systems are typically unilateral and provider‐centric, in that the enterprise service provider assigns the access rights, makes the access control decisions, and determines the privacy policy. There is no negotiation between the client and the service provider about which access control or privacy policy to use. The authors adopt a symmetric, more user‐centric approach to privacy protection and authorization, which treats the client and service provider as peers, in which both can stipulate their requirements and capabilities, and hence negotiate terms which are equally acceptable to both parties.

Findings

The authors demonstrate how the obligation of trust protocol can be used in a number of different scenarios to improve upon the mechanisms that are currently available today.

Practical implications

This approach will serve to increase trust in distributed transactions since each communicating party receives a difficult to repudiate digitally signed acceptance of obligations, in a standard language (XACML), which can be automatically enforced by their respective computing machinery.

Originality/value

The paper adds to current research in trust negotiation, privacy protection and authorization by combining all three together into one set of standardized protocols. Furthermore, by providing hard to repudiate signed acceptance of obligations messages, this strengthens the legal case of the injured party should a dispute arise.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Ronald S. Tibben‐Lembke and Dale S. Rogers

This paper compares and contrasts forward and reverse logistics in a retail environment, with the focus on the reverse flow of product. Many differences between forward…

Abstract

This paper compares and contrasts forward and reverse logistics in a retail environment, with the focus on the reverse flow of product. Many differences between forward and reverse flows of logistics systems are presented. The impact of these factors depends to some extent on the supply chain position of a firm. Unlike much reverse logistics research, which is written from the perspective of the firm which will remanufacture or refurbish the product in the reverse flow, we consider the issues from the perspective of the firm generating the reverse flow.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Roghiyeh Hajizadeh and Nima Jafari Navimipour

Cloud services have become very popular among researchers and people recently. In such a scenario, identifying reliable cloud services has become very important. The trust

Abstract

Purpose

Cloud services have become very popular among researchers and people recently. In such a scenario, identifying reliable cloud services has become very important. The trust value plays a significant role in recognizing reliable providers. The purpose of this paper is to propose a new method to evaluate the trust metric among the cloud providers. The main goal is to increase the precision and accuracy of the trust evaluation method in the cloud environments.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper evaluates the trust metric among the cloud providers and entities by grouping the services and using a behavioral graph. Four parameters, availability, reliability, interaction evolution and identity, are used for evaluating the trust value. The performance of the proposed method is assessed using a simulator which is programmed in the cloud Azure 2013 based on C# codes.

Findings

The method is evaluated through various experiments in terms of precision, recall, error-hit, reliability and availability. The obtained results show that the proposed method has better reliability and availability than the FIFO and QoS models. Also, the results show that increasing the number of groups leads to increasing values of trust, precision and availability, and decreasing values of error-hit.

Originality/value

This paper proposes a trust evaluation method in the cloud environment by grouping the services and using a behavioral graph for improving the amount of availability, error-hit, precision and reliability values.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 46 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

John Leach

There can be no doubt that electronic commerce will become increasingly important to our economic well‐being in the decade ahead. It will allow people and organisations to…

Abstract

There can be no doubt that electronic commerce will become increasingly important to our economic well‐being in the decade ahead. It will allow people and organisations to conduct their current commerce electronically, and it will usher in new patterns of commerce as people identify and take advantage of the new opportunities E‐commerce brings. Much E‐commerce will be little more than the electronic execution of current commercial practice. To the degree that we see a role for the intermediary in current business practice, we will see the role for the electronic equivalent in E‐commerce. However, the change from conventional to electronic commerce will generate the need for an additional type of intermediary that has no direct counterpart in conventional commerce.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Merlin Stone and Paul Laughlin

This paper aims to explore the impact of the internet and related information and communications technology developments on how financial services (FS) are distributed and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the impact of the internet and related information and communications technology developments on how financial services (FS) are distributed and how customers are managed, in particular, not only how companies can differentiate between “good” and “bad” customers and manage them appropriately but also how customers can be “bad” and escape the consequences. It also explores how changes in information asymmetry between suppliers and customers affects who gains or loses from the relationship between them.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for the article are from the authors’ consulting and conference chairing experience. The article is in the form of a reflection on this, rather than a hypothesis-based research article.

Findings

One of its findings is that those responsible for controlling damage done to companies by fraudulent or negative value customers (typically those managing underwriting or risk) and those responsible for recruiting, retaining and developing customers (typically marketing, sales and customer service) do not work closely enough together, and this can lead to not only damage to shareholder value but also damage to the customer experience.

Research limitations/implications

The paper identifies the need for more research covering the processes, data, analysis, systems and strategies required to manage both good and bad customers and the practical problems of implementation.

Practical implications

The main practical implication is that in designing products and the customer service experience, FS marketers need to take into account much more systematically the “dark side” of customer activity.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first to explore its issues in detail.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

The Definitive Guide to Blockchain for Accounting and Business: Understanding the Revolutionary Technology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-865-0

1 – 10 of over 5000