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Article

Elisabetta Savelli, Laura Bravi, Federica Murmura and Tonino Pencarelli

The purpose of this paper is to understand whether an experiential perspective can be usefully adopted in the context of traditional-local foods (TLFs) by assuming a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand whether an experiential perspective can be usefully adopted in the context of traditional-local foods (TLFs) by assuming a consumer perspective that analyses attitudes and behaviours of young people towards truffles. In particular, it examines which values drive the consumption of truffles and whether they are perceived as an experiential-based food or simply a nutritional-based one.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was carried out through a survey conducted on a sample of 720 Italian university students from January to May 2016. The data were processed using analysis of variance, principal component analysis and a two-step cluster analysis.

Findings

The results show that the search for pleasure and gratification can be very important for young consumers and that gratification plays a critical role in the consumption of fresh truffles along with convenience. This confirms that TLFs, like truffles, can be highly appreciated by young consumers for their emotional content, which allows them to have a personal experience when buying and consuming them.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the literature by enriching the overall understanding of young people’s food behaviour and by deepening the adoption of the experiential perspective within the TLF business. Moreover, it has practical and useful implications for promoting the consumption of TLFs among the young and for managing TLFs as well as the rural areas from where they originate.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Vaia Tsitsipati and Christodoulou Athanasios

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the suitability of Greece as a possible market for truffles. Primary data were collected and analysed in a systematic and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the suitability of Greece as a possible market for truffles. Primary data were collected and analysed in a systematic and detailed way to highlight the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of this prospective market development.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-stage survey was conducted using qualitative and quantitative research methods. The data obtained were analysed using the SWOT analysis method.

Findings

The survey highlighted the market characteristics of truffles in Greece. These were sorted into four categories: strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and risks. Results show that truffles have an attractive mix of qualities; however, issues such as the lack of intermediary and customer knowledge and the limited communication of their benefits need to be overcome.

Research limitations/implications

Findings showed that the use of SWOT analysis in specialized food products provides marketers and professionals’ insight and guidance into designing their marketing activities.

Practical implications

Truffles production or trading requires strong commitment by professionals who want to succeed in this market field.

Social implications

Truffles market growth could contribute to the social welfare through the creation of supplemental income, the cultivation of arid fields and the conservation of natural resources due to their environmentally friendly manner of production.

Originality/value

For the first time, SWOT analysis is used to investigate the factors that shape the market of specialized products in the food sector.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 116 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article

Nadia Luciani

Truffles are a type of fungus that grows underground in symbiosiswith the roots of certain trees, such as beeches, oaks and nut trees.The true potential of the British…

Abstract

Truffles are a type of fungus that grows underground in symbiosis with the roots of certain trees, such as beeches, oaks and nut trees. The true potential of the British market is yet to be seen as relatively few people, apart from gastronomes, are aware of their use. Potential market niches for expansion include catering wholesalers, delicatessens, department stores and food manufacturers.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 91 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article

Jade Lindley

Economically motivated food crimes are widespread, and it appears countries and consumers across the globe are affected. Foods targeted and ways of dealing with food…

Abstract

Purpose

Economically motivated food crimes are widespread, and it appears countries and consumers across the globe are affected. Foods targeted and ways of dealing with food crimes vary according to several factors, including the source and destination of the food; demand; availability (e.g. short growing season); price; environmental impacts, such as sustainability (e.g. seafood); likely consumers (e.g. babies); and regulatory controls. Internationally, several foods are well known to be commonly targeted by unscrupulous criminal groups, ultimately leaving unsuspecting consumers exposed economically and physiologically. The purpose of this paper is to understand the nature of food fraud and the criminals committing it.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on a systematic search of international scholarly literature from a wide cross-section of disciplines, parliamentary documents and media articles relating to food crime, this paper cautions the vulnerabilities to food crimes in Australia from a criminological perspective. It draws on crime opportunity theory to explain the modus operandi of criminals engaging in food fraud.

Findings

Inadequate testing regimes, unclear definitions and inadequate laws expose consumers and vulnerable industries to food crimes. With reference to uniquely Australian examples, this paper highlights exposure opportunities and concludes with lessons drawn internationally. Further research is underway to explore how these vulnerabilities can be resolved through closing regulatory gaps and the introduction of innovative technology.

Originality/value

This paper usefully draws on trends in the literature and applies crime opportunity theory to understand how food fraud may present in Australia for everyday foods, as well as emerging and highly prized markets.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

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Article

Sebastian Berger, Fabian Christandl, Christina Schmidt and Christian Baertsch

Entomophagy (i.e. human insect consumption) is seen as one promising route to substantially reduce food-related carbon footprints as insects can be produced at a fraction…

Abstract

Purpose

Entomophagy (i.e. human insect consumption) is seen as one promising route to substantially reduce food-related carbon footprints as insects can be produced at a fraction of the carbon emitted by traditional Western meat production (e.g. beef, pork, poultry). In this light, the purpose of this paper is to address how prices may affect preferences for insects as food.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on consumer research on “positive” functions of prices (e.g. the widely held belief that price and quality are positively correlated), the authors present two behavioural experiments that manipulated price cues to estimate the effect on expectations, eating behaviour and willingness-to-pay as central preference indicators.

Findings

Consistent with the predictions, high prices as initial anchors positively affect food preferences. Furthermore, they incur a positive spill-over effect to subsequent consumption of insects that are unprocessed (i.e. truffles in which mealworms are visible in their entity) and for which no price information is available. Additionally, the authors show that the positive effects of high prices on preferences are muted if prices are artificially lowered (e.g. by means of government subsidies, Experiment 2).

Practical implications

Taken together, the authors show that preferences for novel foods such as insects can be promoted by systematically taking into account behavioural economic theories. This suggests that behavioural theory can be used to reap environmental benefits of entomophagy.

Originality/value

This research links behavioural economics with the actual consumption of insects and therefore complements survey research on behavioural intentions.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Cristiane Pizzutti, Kenny Basso and Manuela Albornoz

The purpose of this research is to test the importance of the discounting attribute in the two-sided communication from a retail salesperson as a boundary condition that…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to test the importance of the discounting attribute in the two-sided communication from a retail salesperson as a boundary condition that eliminates the trade-off between trustworthiness and purchase intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses are tested by three experimental studies in three different retail contexts. Two lab studies manipulate the importance of the attribute and the type of message: one-sided vs two-sided. A field study improves the external validity of the findings.

Findings

A two-sided message from a salesperson reduces the use of persuasion knowledge and, therefore, enhances the consumer’s perception of the salesperson’s trustworthiness; this positive effect remains significant across different levels of importance of the discounting attribute. A two-sided message decreases the consumer’s probability of purchase only when an important attribute is disclaimed, through the consumer’s beliefs regarding the product’s attributes.

Practical implications

For the appropriate use of two-sided appeals, retailers should identify the importance of product attributes from the consumers’ perspective. A negative remark from a salesperson when referred to an unimportant attribute makes no harm to purchase intentions while leading to stronger intentions to return to the store and to recommend the store by enhancing trustworthiness.

Originality/value

This paper shows that it is possible to enhance trustworthiness through a two-sided message without mitigating the intentions of buying by discounting an attribute at low importance in the two-sided message.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 50 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article

Elisa Giacosa, Alberto Ferraris and Filippo Monge

The purpose of this paper is to focus on how a medium-sized company operating in the food sector should strengthen its business model, thanks to a combination between…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on how a medium-sized company operating in the food sector should strengthen its business model, thanks to a combination between tradition and innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

This research focuses on one case study. The subject of the case study under analysis is Golosità dal 1885, an internationally recognized fine food Italian company.

Findings

Golosità dal 1885 is characterized by a strong combination of tradition and innovation, both in products and processes. The company’s competitiveness is the result of a balanced management of innovation, in respect of the family’s values, thanks to the active presence of two family generations.

Research limitations/implications

This study is characterized for some limitations, related to the method and to the choice of a single case study. In terms of theoretical implications, the study emphasizes the importance of the link between the food sector and the region it is rooted in.

Practical implications

Practical implications relate to different groups of stakeholders: for owners and management, for investors, for organizations and institutions working on a territory promotion and in the tourism sector, and for politicians and local authorities.

Originality/value

The originality of the research is represented by a focusing on how a strategy based on an effective combination between tradition and innovation should increase the competitive advantage, especially in a mature sector – as the food one – characterized by the need to offer a differentiated and innovative range of products and services for overcoming the consumptions crisis.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article

Fumes, grit, dust, dirt—all have long been recognized as occupational hazards, their seriousness depending on their nature and how they assail the human body, by…

Abstract

Fumes, grit, dust, dirt—all have long been recognized as occupational hazards, their seriousness depending on their nature and how they assail the human body, by ingestion, absorption, inhalation, the last being considered the most likely to cause permanent damage. It would not be an exaggeration to state that National Insurance (Industrial Injuries) provisions, now contained in the Social Security Act, 1975, with all the regulations made to implement the law, had their birth in compensating victims of lung disease from inhalation of dust. Over the years, the range of recognized dust disease, prescribed under regulations, has grown, but there are other recognized risks to human life and health from dusts of various kinds, produced not from the manufacturing, mining and quarrying, &c. industries; but from a number of areas where it can contaminate and constitute a hazard to vulnerable products and persons. An early intervention by legislation concerned exposed foods, e.g. uncovered meat on open shop fronts, to dust and in narrow streets, mud splashed from road surfaces. The composition of dust varies with its sources—external, atmospheric, seasonal or interior sources, uses and occupations, comings and goings, and in particular, the standards of cleaning and, where necessary, precautions to prevent dust accumulation. One area for long under constant scrutiny and a subject of considerable research is the interior of hospital wards, treatment rooms and operating theatres.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 81 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Gareth Monkman

Sheds light on why there is now such a proliferation of new chemical sensors. Describes various olfactory sensors and their differing uses. Concludes that in some areas…

Abstract

Sheds light on why there is now such a proliferation of new chemical sensors. Describes various olfactory sensors and their differing uses. Concludes that in some areas, although not as efficient as traditional methods, sensors do have some merit.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article

Alberto Monti and Severino Salvemini

The case introduces the evolution and diversification of the Ceretto family business from the production and distribution of their own wines to the opening of two…

Abstract

Purpose

The case introduces the evolution and diversification of the Ceretto family business from the production and distribution of their own wines to the opening of two restaurants and the promotion of cultural and artistic projects. The case provides specific details about how strategic decisions were made. In particular, it shows how non-economic factors such as founders’ identity and personal relationships can shape the choice of new ventures and the formation of alliances. Since the second generation of the family joined the company, the case is useful to highlight the succession process in a family-owned company. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Due to the exploratory nature of the study the authors adopted a qualitative approach. Information was collected through secondary data and semi-structured, face-to-face interviews with family members and the company's top management. The case explores from a theoretical and empirical point of view the entrepreneurial decision-making process and how it affects the evolution of the company strategy.

Findings

The case illustrates the role of founders’ (organizational) identity and of social relationships in influencing the diversification of the company and its partnership strategy.

Research limitations/implications

The research strategy does not allow generalizations.

Originality/value

The case integrates strategic alliances literature highlighting the importance of the nature of the tie existing between companies before the alliance is set and of the decision makers’ identity in shaping partnerships’ choice. The case is useful in entrepreneurship and managing small or family business courses but also for students attending management of foods and beverage or cultural management courses.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 52 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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