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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2022

Cathrine Filstad, Trude Høgvold Olsen and Anja Overgaard Thomassen

This paper aims to contribute to the literature on distributed sensemaking by studying how the police establish and develop their new position as police contacts during…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to contribute to the literature on distributed sensemaking by studying how the police establish and develop their new position as police contacts during the police reform.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors studied how the position of police contact, a cornerstone of the recent Norwegian police reform, was interpreted and practised. The authors interviewed police contacts at two different times during reform implementation to explore how they made sense of and practised their job.

Findings

The authors identified three interpretations of the position of police contact and describe them as ideal types: an administrative position, a professional position and a strategic position. The ideal types were reinforced rather than developing towards a shared understanding. Our data demonstrate that the sensemaking processes and experimentation to settle into the new position involved local actors internally in the police and externally in relation to local authorities, and reinforced local interpretations.

Originality/value

This study supports the notion of sensemaking as distributed but extends previous research by suggesting that “ideal types” help us understand the content of interpretations. This study also extends the understanding by showing that distributed sensemaking takes place as individuals make sense of more open-ended problems. This challenges the understanding of the term distributed, because unless challenged, distributed sensemaking in isolated pockets of the organization remain local, and the authors suggest that the term local distributed sensemaking captures this phenomenon.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Trude Høgvold Olsen, Tone Glad and Cathrine Filstad

This paper aims to investigate whether the formal and informal learning patterns of community health-care nurses changed in the wake of a reform that altered their work by…

1086

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate whether the formal and informal learning patterns of community health-care nurses changed in the wake of a reform that altered their work by introducing new patient groups, and to explore whether conditions in the new workplaces facilitated or impeded shifts in learning patterns.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through interviews with experienced nurses in community health care to learn whether and how they changed their learning patterns and the challenges they experienced in establishing new work practices.

Findings

In established learning patterns among nurses, the most experienced nurse passes on the knowledge to novices. These knowledge boundaries were challenged and they created new contexts and tasks calling for more cross-disciplinary cooperation. The informants acknowledged the need for formal and informal learning activities to change their learning pattern in addressing new knowledge challenges. Structural and cultural factors in community health care impeded changes in individual and collective learning patterns.

Research limitations/implications

This paper reports a single case study. Further study is needed on how changes in structural and contextual conditions challenge the established formal and informal learning patterns.

Practical implications

It is crucial that managers facilitate the development of new routines, structures and cultures to support individual initiatives and the growth of necessary changes in established practice to implement a new reform.

Originality/value

This study’s contribution to the literature primarily concerns how changes in structural conditions challenge formal and informal learning patterns, and the structural and cultural conditions for these learning patterns.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2018

Baard H. Borge, Cathrine Filstad, Trude Høgvold Olsen and Per Øyvind Skogmo

This study aims to explore whether hierarchical position and organizational size affect perceptions of a learning organization (LO) during reform implementation.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore whether hierarchical position and organizational size affect perceptions of a learning organization (LO) during reform implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

An electronic survey was distributed in four Norwegian police districts at an early stage of reform implementation. One of the objectives of the reform was to develop the police toward being more knowledge-based, and there had been specific calls for the police to become a LO. The 753 respondents were top managers, middle managers and employees.

Findings

Respondents rated their organizations lower than benchmark scores on supportive learning environment, learning processes and practices and leadership that reinforces learning. The perceptions diverged across hierarchical levels: middle managers and top managers gave higher scores to the organization as a learning one than employees did. Respondents from large police districts gave higher scores to their organizational units as LOs than respondents from small police districts.

Research limitations/implications

The study captures perceptions of characteristics of a LO at one point in reform implementation, and further studies are needed to fully understand explanations of diverging views within an organization as to whether it can be characterized as a LO.

Practical implications

Actual differences in local learning practices or different assessments of learning practices within the organization should be considered when developing LOs.

Originality/value

The study contributes to our knowledge of LOs by showing diverging views within the same organization in a context of reform implementation.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 October 2019

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

154

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds his/her own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

One of the more light-hearted interpretations of how to define organizational culture is to simply say. “It’s the way we do things around here”. This is illuminating and frustrating in equal measure, as while it does contain a kernel of truth - understanding how and why people take the positions and actions they do is central to the question of culture – it is also rather glib and is simply true of everywhere you might ask that question. It also points to a certain wariness and even defiance on behalf of the people answering the question in such a way, as if to challenge the newcomer into accepting how their world operates, and that it is never going to change.

Practical implications

This paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world’s leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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