Search results

1 – 10 of 253
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Robert L. Flood and Norma R.A. Romm

Introduces diversity management as managing the increased diversity of issues that confront humankind in contemporary organizational and societal affairs. Defines triple

Abstract

Introduces diversity management as managing the increased diversity of issues that confront humankind in contemporary organizational and societal affairs. Defines triple loop learning as being about the increase in the fullness and deepness of learning about the diversity of issues and dilemmas faced. Presents the contours of diversity management and triple loop learning. Sees the latter as the dénouement of single loop learning and of double loop learning. Provides a “quickmap” of the contours of diversity management and triple loop learning.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 25 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 1999

A. Georges L. Romme and Arjen van Witteloostuijn

The organizational learning literature distinguishes different levels of learning (zero learning and single, double and triple loop learning) in order to understand the…

Abstract

The organizational learning literature distinguishes different levels of learning (zero learning and single, double and triple loop learning) in order to understand the complexity and dynamics of changes in policies, objectives, mental maps, and structures and strategies for learning. This article explores the case of an emerging new organizational design, the circular organization, in order to understand the role of triple loop learning. The circular model was developed on the basis of ideas about the relationship between organizational structure and behavior taken from theories of dynamic systems. Circular design precepts appear to provide a structural facilitation of single and double loop learning. In this respect, the circular design tends to act as a facilitating infrastructure for triple loop learning, that is, exploring the structural opportunities and key competences people need to participate in making well‐informed choices about policies, objectives and other issues.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 April 2011

Patrizia Ameli and D. Christopher Kayes

This paper aims to build on notions of a higher level of organizational learning to suggest another dimension: interorganizational learning that emerges in a cross‐sector…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to build on notions of a higher level of organizational learning to suggest another dimension: interorganizational learning that emerges in a cross‐sector partnership.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study was conducted with the DC Central Kitchen (DCCK) partnership with for‐profit and governmental entities. Research methods included interviews with the founder, CEO, and manager responsible for the relationship with partners; direct observation during volunteer work at DCCK; and review of archival data and physical artifacts.

Findings

At the organizational level, DCCK was a learning organization because the principal variables – culture, strategy, shared vision, and knowledge management – were focused on learning. At the interorganizational level, the network was like a constellation of organizations. DCCK had many dyadic relationships with its partners, but the partners were not always interconnected with one another. Triple‐loop learning occurred in DCCK but was not yet developed among partners. DCCK benefited the community both tangibly, as seen in its education projects, and culturally, by giving a more central role to the nonprofit organization in the economic system.

Originality/value

The paper illustrates the value of interorganizational learning across two or more sectors of organizations.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Asher Ramish and Haris Aslam

– The purpose of this paper is to propose performance measures for supply chain knowledge management (SCKM) performance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose performance measures for supply chain knowledge management (SCKM) performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual study. State of performance measurement has been analyzed on the basis of a comprehensive review of literature in field of SCKM. Based on principles of double and triple loop learning, performance measures have been identified for measuring the success of KM practices in SCs.

Findings

Principles of double and triple loop learning have been utilized to suggest KPI’s for SCKM performance, i.e. supply chain identity and knowledge supply chain stratum. The relevance and justification of these KPI’s is also discussed.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to conceptualized measures for SCKM only. Further research is required to test the benefits of these performance measures based on industry applications.

Practical implications

These proposed KPI’s will facilitate the development of the new processes through re-engineering, i.e. problem identification and then rectification. Further, these KPI’s will provide some essential insights as to how supply chains can develop their performance evaluation systems to become more effective and learning oriented.

Originality/value

This study aims to not only identify the gaps present in the SCKM performance measurement literature but also aims to fill the knowledge gap by suggesting suitable performance metrics.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Robert L. Flood and Norma R.A. Romm

The purpose of the paper is to introduce a systemic approach to organizational learning “triple loop learning” (TLL) that addresses processes of power. Three equally…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to introduce a systemic approach to organizational learning “triple loop learning” (TLL) that addresses processes of power. Three equally important foci in our TLL are processes of design, processes of debate and processes of power. The focus on power aims to shift “power over” (power as domination) to “power to” enact empowering designs, “power to” co-develop responsible decision-making and “power to” transform our relations with each other and with life on Earth.

Design/methodology/approach

The organizational learning literature is reviewed in the context of power dynamics and its shortcomings are highlighted. The authors introduce their understanding of TLL, and how it engages with power dynamics in organizations.

Findings

Peter Senge’s conceptualization of systems thinking is unable to recognize processes of power in organizations and offers limited support to transformative learning. Conceptualizations of TLL aim to enhance learning in organizations but none satisfactorily address the processes of power. The learning organization literature as a whole does not satisfactorily address processes of power or reflect our way of envisaging “looping between loops of learning” in TLL to better design, better debate and better develop relationality in the social fabric of organizations.

Originality/value

The authors introduce an original approach to TLL that directly addresses the processes of power in organizations. It offers researchers, learning facilitators and practitioners of the learning organization a way to engage with the processes of power without neglecting other important organizational and environmental issues.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Patrick Finnegan, Robert D. Galliers and Philip Powell

Previous research has highlighted the need to examine the appropriateness of existing information systems methods in the context of electronic business environments. This…

Abstract

Previous research has highlighted the need to examine the appropriateness of existing information systems methods in the context of electronic business environments. This paper argues for a re‐examination of the suitability of current planning practices in light of the complexity of developing electronic business systems. In particular, the paper illustrates that planning and developing business‐to‐business electronic trading systems (ETS) is fraught with difficulties associated with the priorities and power of individual actors in participant organisations. The authors discuss triple loop learning (TLL), an approach that deals with diverse requirements and power issues, and argue that it may assist in overcoming some of the problems identified. The study aims to analyse the theoretical usefulness of the concepts of triple loop learning in the context of planning inter‐organisational ETS. Using the data gathered from case studies of three inter‐organisational networks, the authors argue that approaches associated with TLL can offer insight into managing inter‐organisational systems complexities, and can thereby enhance planning methods for ETS.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 August 2009

Jennifer Rindfleish, Alison Sheridan and Sue‐Ellen Kjeldal

The purpose of this paper is to present personal experiences of using storytelling as a “sensemaking” tool, to argue for the benefits of this method as a process of better…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present personal experiences of using storytelling as a “sensemaking” tool, to argue for the benefits of this method as a process of better understanding the gendered academy and the role storytelling can play in effecting change.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on personal experiences of storytelling within workplaces, the paper explores how stories between colleagues can lead to positive change through the co‐construction of new worlds of meaning which are spontaneously revised through interaction.

Findings

The paper demonstrates how storytelling between individuals experiencing inequality makes visible the gendered practices in academic workplaces and can lead to a change in those experiences of the workplace. Also, such stories can be a means for prompting change through negotiation. Theoretically, a triple‐loop learning environment within an organization could provide the agora required for stories about inequality to be heard continually and change to come about through negotiation.

Research limitations/implications

The paper uses a method that serves as a heuristic device and as such cannot be generalized for all organizational settings. The findings offer a new but partial solution for negotiating gender inequity in academia by suggesting that there must be more storytelling in openly public spaces between colleagues to challenge and negotiate the gendered organizational cultures of academia.

Practical implications

The application of the method of triple‐loop learning in academic organizational settings can assist in challenging and changing gender inequity through the consistent use of narratives.

Originality/value

The paper is unique in that it argues for the value of a self‐reflexive narrative form of method which favours stories being shared in public spaces – the agora – as a way of addressing gender inequity within complex, male dominated professions such as academia.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Roland Yeo

This paper distils practical perspectives from experienced consultants on an integrative framework on organisational learning and performance. The foundation of this…

Abstract

This paper distils practical perspectives from experienced consultants on an integrative framework on organisational learning and performance. The foundation of this framework is governed by behavioural and cognitive learning theories. Convergent interviewing was the methodology used to verify the practicality of the framework and provide insight for further development. Data derived from four organisational development consultants confirmed the framework’s feasibility, but suggested additional issues to examine organisational learning further. The conclusion drawn is that there are distinct stages of learning but the relationship between them is robust and dynamic. Further, the notion of “triple‐loop learning” is often misconstrued in practical contexts due to its level of abstraction. Effective leadership is regarded as the leitmotif in driving strategic organisational learning initiatives. However, leaders must consider the time factor involved, as such initiatives can only take effect after a period of time rather than immediately.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Nekane Aramburu, Josune Sáenz and Olga Rivera

The purpose of this research is to analyze the relationship between the organizational learning capacity of manufacturing companies in the Spanish Basque Region and their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to analyze the relationship between the organizational learning capacity of manufacturing companies in the Spanish Basque Region and their management systems.

Design/methodology/approach

To this end, an ad hoc questionnaire was devised and addressed to the Chief Executive Officers of a representative sample of 200 companies from all manufacturing sectors of the Basque Country.

Findings

The results obtained show that the characteristics of the management system of a company (the strategy formulation process and organizational design) do not condition the learning level that can be attained as a result of an experience of concrete change. However, it is true that companies which have experienced changes in which a high level of learning has been achieved have adapted their management systems more according to what theorists deem appropriate to help future learning.

Originality/value

The research carried out allows a better practical knowledge of the existing relationship between management systems, change processes, and levels of organizational learning.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Patrik Nordin, Anna-Aurora Kork and Inka Koskela

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on the potential of organizational learning for developing effectiveness of care. Value-based healthcare measurement recognizes…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on the potential of organizational learning for developing effectiveness of care. Value-based healthcare measurement recognizes patient value as a driver for improving health outcomes at the societal and individual levels. By using the action learning method, this paper examines the phases of organizational learning in a private healthcare organization that has developed a novel Big Data screening tool for the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2).

Design/methodology/approach

Relying on triple-loop learning as a conceptual framework and by applying the action learning method to case study design, this paper illustrates the phases of organizational learning and efforts to utilize value-based measurement in healthcare.

Findings

The case organization was able to identify patients at risk and to improve their care balance. Although the results for the measurement of patient outcomes led to questioning of previous care processes and practices in the organization, increasing value for all stakeholders by incorporating social needs to business opportunities remains under process.

Originality/value

With the focus on organizational learning and organizational value creation processes, this paper demonstrates incorporation of measuring patient outcomes in re-structuring care processes, enhancing organizational performance and improving effectiveness as well as quality of care.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

1 – 10 of 253