Search results

1 – 6 of 6
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2019

Trine Dahl and Kjersti Fløttum

The purpose of this paper is to explore how energy companies discursively construct climate change when integrating it into their overall business strategy.

Downloads
1002

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how energy companies discursively construct climate change when integrating it into their overall business strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

This linguistic study uses a quantitative/qualitative approach to investigate three instances of recent climate disclosure, climate strategy reports, by the energy majors Statoil (now Equinor), Suncor Energy and Total. The qualitative analysis focuses on how keywords and expressions function in their immediate linguistic context. The discussion takes the socio-political and business context of the companies into account.

Findings

The paper finds that the reports discursively construct climate change in different ways. Total presents climate change primarily as a responsibility the company is ready to take on; Suncor Energy presents it primarily as a business risk; and Statoil as a business opportunity. In the material as a whole, however, the risk representation is the most prevalent.

Research limitations/implications

The material is relatively modest; however, the three reports represent the first comprehensive accounts of how energy players fit climate considerations into their overall strategy. The analysis is based on three search terms (responsibility, risk and opportunity). Further studies should include a broader range of words that may be semantically related to each approach.

Practical implications

The study can inform corporate strategy discussions and indicate the rhetorical implications of discourse-related choices in climate disclosure.

Originality/value

The study deals with very recent corporate disclosure involving an emerging discourse, climate strategy reporting. As the reports represent responses to investor engagement, the findings should also be relevant for studies involving stakeholder perceptions.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 July 2019

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Downloads
148

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Statoil (Equinor), Suncor, and Total were the first three energy companies to produce climate strategy reports. Analyzing these, it is possible to discover how these companies view climate change in relation to their business strategy moving forward.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives, strategists and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 35 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here

Abstract

Details

Digital Detox: The Politics of Disconnecting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-342-5

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 30 March 2020

Trine Syvertsen

Abstract

Details

Digital Detox: The Politics of Disconnecting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-342-5

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Alessandro Anastasi

1. En guise d’introduction.‐ 2. Droit du tra vail, droit social et (des)ordre international.‐ 3. Droit du tra vail, droit social, légalité et droits sociaux.‐ 4. Droit du…

Abstract

1. En guise d’introduction.‐ 2. Droit du tra vail, droit social et (des)ordre international.‐ 3. Droit du tra vail, droit social, légalité et droits sociaux.‐ 4. Droit du travail, droit social, légalité et correction des inégalités.‐ 5. Quelques mots á propos du rôle du Droit dutravail.‐ 6. Réflexions (supplémentaires) sur le droit du tra vail: les domaines possibles de spéculation théorique et de re cher che appliquée.‐ 7. En matière des orientations générales du droit du travail á l’époque contemporaine. ‐ 8. Le défi de la mondialisation.‐ 9. èour un modèle économique et so cial européen.‐ 10. A propos de Constitution européenne et ..... alentours.‐ 11. Le traitement juridique de la ques tion économique et sociale en Eu rope.‐ 12. Le mythe de la li bre concurrence.‐ 13. Quelques conclusions, pas conclusives.‐

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 47 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1968

R. OLIVER GIBSON

Educational administration still relics greatly on “wise” generalizations from the experiences of outstanding practitioners. Hence, a great many decisions in educational…

Downloads
665

Abstract

Educational administration still relics greatly on “wise” generalizations from the experiences of outstanding practitioners. Hence, a great many decisions in educational practice are still at the “professional lore” level. With the rapid expansion in knowledge, emphasis has tended to shift to the expert and the technician. Nevertheless, value decisions should not be permitted to be eroded. The educational decision‐maker needs to be both humanist and scientist. A rational basis exists for such a nexus. There is need for the joint operation of knowledge and value systems in decision‐making Both systems pass from the rather uncritical “Common Sense Stage” through the Empirical to the Scientific Stage. Self‐conscious rational action becomes possible only at the Scientific Stage. It is only within comparatively recent times that decision‐making in education has begun to move into the Scientific Stage, primarily because scientific knowledge about human behaviour is largely a product of this century. A decision is seen to be concerned primarily with predictions of future events that are desirable to people. The decision process involves (1) monitoring, (2) control (diagnosis, selection, transformation) and (3) action.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

1 – 6 of 6