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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2019

Yaxin Peng, Naiwu Wen, Chaomin Shen, Xiaohuang Zhu and Shihui Ying

Partial alignment for 3 D point sets is a challenging problem for laser calibration and robot calibration due to the unbalance of data sets, especially when the overlap of…

Abstract

Purpose

Partial alignment for 3 D point sets is a challenging problem for laser calibration and robot calibration due to the unbalance of data sets, especially when the overlap of data sets is low. Geometric features can promote the accuracy of alignment. However, the corresponding feature extraction methods are time consuming. The purpose of this paper is to find a framework for partial alignment by an adaptive trimmed strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

First, the authors propose an adaptive trimmed strategy based on point feature histograms (PFH) coding. Second, they obtain an initial transformation based on this partition, which improves the accuracy of the normal direction weighted trimmed iterative closest point (ICP) method. Third, they conduct a series of GPU parallel implementations for time efficiency.

Findings

The initial partition based on PFH feature improves the accuracy of the partial registration significantly. Moreover, the parallel GPU algorithms accelerate the alignment process.

Research limitations/implications

This study is applicable to rigid transformation so far. It could be extended to non-rigid transformation.

Practical implications

In practice, point set alignment for calibration is a technique widely used in the fields of aircraft assembly, industry examination, simultaneous localization and mapping and surgery navigation.

Social implications

Point set calibration is a building block in the field of intelligent manufacturing.

Originality/value

The contributions are as follows: first, the authors introduce a novel coarse alignment as an initial calibration by PFH descriptor similarity, which can be viewed as a coarse trimmed process by partitioning the data to the almost overlap part and the rest part; second, they reduce the computation time by GPU parallel coding during the acquisition of feature descriptor; finally, they use the weighted trimmed ICP method to refine the transformation.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2014

Tijjani Adam and U. Hashim

The purpose of this study is to present reports on fabrication of silicon (Si) nanowires (NWs). The study consists of microwire formation on silicon-on-insulator (SOI…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to present reports on fabrication of silicon (Si) nanowires (NWs). The study consists of microwire formation on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) that was fabricated using a top-down approach which involved conventional photolithography coupled with shallow anisotropic etching.

Design/methodology/approach

A 5-inch p-type silicon-on-insulator (SOI) coated with 250nm layer and Photoresist (PR) with thickness of 400nm is coated in order to make pattern transfer via binary mask, after the exposure and development, a resist pattern between 3 μm-5 μm were obtained, Oxygen plasma spreen was used to reduce the size of the PR to 800 μm, after this, the wafer with 800 μm was loaded into SAMCO inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-RIE and got silicoon microwire was obtained. Next, the sample was put into an oxidation furnace for 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes and the sample was removed and dipped into a buffered oxide etch solution for five minutes to remove all the SiO2 ashes.

Findings

The morphological characterization was conducted using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. At terminal two, gold electrodes which were designated as source and drain were fabricated on top of individual NWs using conventional lithography electrical and chemical response. Once the trimming process has been completed, the device's current–voltage (I-V) characteristic was measured by using a Keithley 4200 semiconductor parameter analyser. Devices with different width of wires approximately 20, 40, 60 and 80 nm were characterized. The wire current variation as a function of the pH variation in voltage was investigated: pH monitoring for variations of pH values between 5 and 9.

Originality/value

This paper provides useful information on novel and yet simple cost-effective fabrication of SiNW; as such, it should be of interest to a broad readership, especially those interested in micro/nanofabrication.

Details

Microelectronics International, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-5362

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

George Stockman, Jayson Payne, Jermil Sadler and Dirk Colbry

To report on the evaluation of error of a face matching system consisting of a 3D sensor for obtaining the surface of the face, and a two‐stage matching algorithm that…

Abstract

Purpose

To report on the evaluation of error of a face matching system consisting of a 3D sensor for obtaining the surface of the face, and a two‐stage matching algorithm that matches the sensed surface to a model surface.

Design/methodology/approach

Rigid mannikin face that was, otherwise, fairly realistic was obtained, and several sensing and matching experiments were performed. Pose position, lighting and face color were controlled.

Findings

The combined sensor‐matching system typically reported correct face surface matches with trimmed RMS error of 0.5 mm or less for a generous volume of parameters, including roll, pitch, yaw, position, lighting, and facecolor. Error accelerated beyond this “approximately frontal” set of parameters. Mannikin results are compared to results with thousands of cases of real faces. The sensor accuracy is not a limiting component of the system, but supports the application well.

Practical implications

The sensor supports the application well (except for the current cost). Equal error rates achieved appear to be practical for face verification.

Originality/value

No similar report is known for sensing faces.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2019

Kun Wei, Yong Dai and Bingyin Ren

This paper aims to propose an identification method based on monocular vision for cylindrical parts in cluttered scene, which solves the issue that iterative closest point…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose an identification method based on monocular vision for cylindrical parts in cluttered scene, which solves the issue that iterative closest point (ICP) algorithm fails to obtain global optimal solution, as the deviation from scene point cloud to target CAD model is huge in nature.

Design/methodology/approach

The images of the parts are captured at three locations by a camera amounted on a robotic end effector to reconstruct initial scene point cloud. Color signatures of histogram of orientations (C-SHOT) local feature descriptors are extracted from the model and scene point cloud. Random sample consensus (RANSAC) algorithm is used to perform the first initial matching of point sets. Then, the second initial matching is conducted by proposed remote closest point (RCP) algorithm to make the model get close to the scene point cloud. Levenberg Marquardt (LM)-ICP is used to complete fine registration to obtain accurate pose estimation.

Findings

The experimental results in bolt-cluttered scene demonstrate that the accuracy of pose estimation obtained by the proposed method is higher than that obtained by two other methods. The position error is less than 0.92 mm and the orientation error is less than 0.86°. The average recognition rate is 96.67 per cent and the identification time of the single bolt does not exceed 3.5 s.

Practical implications

The presented approach can be applied or integrated into automatic sorting production lines in the factories.

Originality/value

The proposed method improves the efficiency and accuracy of the identification and classification of cylindrical parts using a robotic arm.

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Article
Publication date: 19 April 2011

I.T. Kadim, M.R. Al‐Ani, R.S. Al‐Maqbaly, M.H. Mansour, O. Mahgoub and E.H. Johnson

The purpose of the paper is to study the effects of cooking on proximate composition, amino acids, fatty acids, minerals and total, heme and non‐heme iron content of camel meat.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to study the effects of cooking on proximate composition, amino acids, fatty acids, minerals and total, heme and non‐heme iron content of camel meat.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of ten longissimus thoracis muscles (500 grams) were collected between the tenth and twelfth ribs of the left side. Samples were randomly collected from two to three year old camel carcasses chilled (1‐3°C) for 48 hours then stored at −20°C. The first portion was kept fresh while the second one was placed in plastic bags and cooked by immersion in a water bath at 70°C for 90 minutes. Both samples were freeze‐dried, and then ground to a homogeneous mass to be used for chemical analyses.

Findings

Cooked samples had significantly (p<0.05) higher dry matter by 27.7 per cent, protein by 31.1 per cent and fat by 22.2 per cent, but lower ash content by 8.3 per cent than the raw ones. Cooking had no significant effect on amino acid and fatty acid composition of the meat. The components of camel meat most significantly affected by cooking were macro‐ and micro‐minerals, which ranged between 13.1 and 52.5 per cent, respectively. Cooking resulted in a significant decrease in total, heme and non‐heme iron contents by 4.3, 8.7 and 4.0 per cent, respectively.

Research limitations/implications

The research is restricted to camel meat but it is an exploratory study. The issue of research outcome as only longissimus thoracic muscle is another limitation. Further investigation is needed to include different muscles, temperatures, durations and cooking methods.

Practical implications

Amino acids and fatty acids of camel meat are not affected by cooking, while heating accelerated total and heme iron oxidation suggest camel meat to be a rich source of heme iron.

Originality/value

The paper is original in its findings and useful for both researchers and academics in the field of meat science.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 113 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 8 November 2011

Huseyin Saricimen, Abdulquddusa Quddus, Omar A. Eid, Aftab Ahmad, Anwar Ul‐Hamid and Tawqir A. Siddique

The purpose of this paper is to determine the long‐term corrosion behavior of cast iron coupons in the Jubail Industrial City (JIC), Saudi Arabia.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the long‐term corrosion behavior of cast iron coupons in the Jubail Industrial City (JIC), Saudi Arabia.

Design/methodology/approach

The samples were exposed under atmospheric, underground, and splash zone conditions, at Khaleej Mardumah Test Station (KMTS) in Jubail. Soil, groundwater, seawater and air particulate samples were collected at the exposure sites and were analyzed. Secondary electron microscopy (SEM), X‐ray diffraction (XRD) and X‐ray fluorescence (XRF) were used to examine the surface morphology of the test coupons and identify the corrosion products developed on the surface of the metals. The corrosion rates of the coupons were determined by weight loss method.

Findings

The results showed that the atmosphere, underground and splash zone conditions all were very corrosive to cast iron, due to temperature and humidity variations as well as the high chloride and sulfate concentrations in the region. The splash zone was the most corrosive regime of the three test zones. The main corrosive ions in the environments were identified as chloride and sulfate. The maximum chloride and sulfate concentrations were measured to be 8.94 and 49.65 μg/m3 in atmosphere, 8,040 and 1,410 ppm in soil, and 29,500 and 5,770 mg/l in seawater, respectively. The corrosion rates of cast irons were found to be 343‐536 μm/y in splash zone, 90‐214 μm/y in underground, and 22‐27 μm/y in atmosphere. Compared to other parts of the world, the soil, marine and atmospheric environments at the selected test site are very corrosive.

Originality/value

In this paper, corrosion of cast iron is presented in atmospheric, soil and splash zone conditions along the eastern coast of the Arabian Gulf.

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 58 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2008

Shiaw‐Wen Tien, Chiu‐Yen Liu, Yi‐Chan Chung, Chih‐Hung Tsai and Ching‐Piao Chen

Since the execution of National Health Insurance system in Taiwan, the competition of medical industry is becoming more and more severe. The ways the hospital operate…

Abstract

Since the execution of National Health Insurance system in Taiwan, the competition of medical industry is becoming more and more severe. The ways the hospital operate knowledge management (KM) concept, combine current human resources and professional knowledge by information techniques and upgrade the competitiveness through reinvention of organizational culture have become the important issues. This research is based on the relationship between KM and organizational operation, integrates the characteristic of medical institutions and framework of medical knowledge cycle and starts the research subject by questionnaires from three dimensions: current situation of KM construction in medical organizations, executive effect of KM activities and the challenges faced by KM; subsequently, from qualitative interview, this research attempts to understand how a medical organization executes and adjusts in the consideration of theory and reality as well as quality and costs when actually operates the organization. This research accesses to KM system application of medical institutions and the empirical executive benefits and difficulties through questionnaires. The research results are as follows: (1) having initial understanding toward current KM establishment of medical institutions; (2) confirming the most important items of KM establishment of medical organizations; (3) understanding the most difficulty which the medical organizations encounter when executing KM; (4) establishing medical knowledge cycle figure of the hospitals receiving interviews. Through case interview, this research profoundly accessed to the actual operation of KM application of medical organizations. The target hospitals intended to try many medical KM measures; however, during to complicated hospital organizations and cultural characteristics, the promotion was not successful and the results were not apparent. The most difficulty was to change the employees’ behavior. The targets believed that only the continuous promotion of KM can allow it to be an important aspect of organizational culture and the competitiveness could constant be upgraded.

Details

Asian Journal on Quality, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1598-2688

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1978

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the…

Abstract

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the 1970 Act (which has been amended by the Sex Discrimination Act 1975) provides:

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2009

Yasmine Probst

The purpose of this paper is to summarise analysed nutrient data for Australian chicken meat and compare analysed data for Australian chicken meat with overseas data.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to summarise analysed nutrient data for Australian chicken meat and compare analysed data for Australian chicken meat with overseas data.

Design/methodology/approach

Analysed nutrient data for Australian chicken meat was compared with publicly available English language databases from overseas countries. Where similar cuts were available, ratio plots were developed to determine similarities and differences. Baked chicken leg was highest in total fat and wings were composed of the greatest amount of monounsaturated fat.

Findings

Nutrient values for calcium, zinc and vitamin E were greatest in the chicken leg, iron in the chicken thigh and the B vitamins varied between chicken breast (niacin), chicken thigh (riboflavin and thiamin). Data for Australian chicken meat was most different from European data and most similar to New Zealand data. The greatest variations were identified for the total fat and fatty acid values.

Practical implications

The large differences signify the importance of using local nutrient values and the need to regularly update food composition databases with analysed rather than calculated data.

Originality/value

This paper is unique as it provides comprehensive nutrient data for a lean meat source which is popular in Australia. The study also indicates the limitations associated with sourcing food composition data from other databases, despite using the same food name.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 25 October 2014

Tim Loreman, Chris Forlin, Dianne Chambers, Umesh Sharma and Joanne Deppeler

This chapter provides an overview of inclusive education, specifically examining conceptualisations of inclusive education and some of the models used to frame an…

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of inclusive education, specifically examining conceptualisations of inclusive education and some of the models used to frame an evaluation of the practice. While international human rights agreements, covenants and legislation provide definitions that focus on equity, access, opportunity and rights, inclusive education continues to lack a tight conceptual focus that may contribute to its misconception and often confused practices. In the absence of a unified definition of what inclusion is, attempts to measure or compare such a complex equity issue are challenging. Some promising models do, however, exist and are explored in this chapter.

Details

Measuring Inclusive Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-146-6

Keywords

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