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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2021

Yingying Hu, Ling Zhao, Xin (Robert) Luo, Sumeet Gupta and Xiuhong He

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to clarify what specific behaviors are involved in consumers' partial switching in mobile application (app) usage, and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to clarify what specific behaviors are involved in consumers' partial switching in mobile application (app) usage, and, second, to explore the common and differential motivations of these behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper specified two behaviors in consumers' partial switching in mobile app usage, trialing and combining behaviors, and conceptualized them as different types of variety seeking behaviors. A theoretical model contrasting intrinsic motivations and extrinsic motivations on the two behaviors was developed and tested with a sample of 561 mobile app users in China.

Findings

The findings showed that both trialing and combining behaviors could be motivated by intrinsic individual-related and extrinsic technology-related factors. Besides, intrinsic individual-related factors were more effective in motivating trialing behavior, whereas extrinsic technology-related factors were more effective in motivating combining behavior. All these findings are applicable and consistent in both hedonic and utilitarian apps.

Originality/value

This study extends and advances the literature on information technology switching by investigating consumer use behaviors from a new perspective of partial switching and multiple competing apps usage. This study also contributes to variety seeking literature by extending the understanding of variety seeking to the context of mobile app usage. Finally, by investigating the associations and distinctions of trialing and combining behavior, this study not only helps to fully understand the partial switching but also enriches the understanding of different types of variety seeking behaviors.

Details

Internet Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2013

Erik Bichard and Nirooja Thurairajah

Government policies in many countries are trying to accelerate conservation of energy as part of wider carbon management or energy security strategies. This paper aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

Government policies in many countries are trying to accelerate conservation of energy as part of wider carbon management or energy security strategies. This paper aims to describe a trial that tested a behaviour change strategy that combined three different influencing components designed to motivate home owners to invest in energy‐saving measures in the UK.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design was based on the findings from an earlier phase of the project and was further supported with a comprehensive literature review. Data collection was carried out using survey strategies, interviews and capturing the actions of the participating households. Data analysis was undertaken using descriptive statistical methods and the most appropriate software.

Findings

The project results reflected that a combination of information delivered at key moments in the decision‐making process, incentives, and norm‐based influences have the potential to help motivate owners of domestic property to invest in energy‐saving measures. However, this strategy needs to be delivered within the context of affordable materials and installer costs.

Research limitations/implications

The trial was designed to be a limited sample experiment that was commissioned as a proof of concept study. However, policy‐makers may require a larger sample and an extended period before the proposals are rolled out on a national scale.

Originality/value

Although there are many behaviour change studies, there are far fewer on pro‐environmental behaviour in relation to climate change. This study places an emphasis on non‐cash incentives as the central proposition and this cannot be found within the relevant knowledge domain. The trial was also original in the way it incorporated other influencers including norm‐based tactics and facilitation in a combined strategy with incentives.

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Silvia Artoni, Maria Claudia Buzzi, Marina Buzzi, Claudia Fenili, Barbara Leporini, Simona Mencarini and Caterina Senette

Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) is a scientific method for modelling human behavior, successfully applied in the context of Autism. Recording and sharing measurable data…

Abstract

Purpose

Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) is a scientific method for modelling human behavior, successfully applied in the context of Autism. Recording and sharing measurable data (on subjects’ performance) between caregivers guarantees consistency of learning programs and allows monitoring the learning enhancements. Data are usually recorded on paper, which requires considerable effort and is subject to error. The purpose of this paper is to describe a portable application developed to support ABA tutors in their work with autistic subjects. It allows gathering data from ABA sessions, giving tutors rapid access to information, also in graphical formats.

Design/methodology/approach

The tool was designed via participatory design. Various ABA team members were involved, in order to make the application respond perfectly to their needs. The approach aims to ensure maximum usability, while minimizing errors and ambient interference.

Findings

The use of mobile devices (i.e. tablets or smartphones) allows mobility and ease of interaction, enabling efficient data collection and processing. Data plotting allows one to easily interpret gathered data.

Social implications

The proposed application, free open source software, can be a valuable aid for supporting the ABA intervention and favor the inclusion of children with autism.

Originality/value

Available software to assist tutors during therapy sessions is often proprietary, and research prototypes are not freely available, so paper forms are still widespread. Besides, without attention to usability requirements, assisting tools would be comparable in efficiency with data insertion on paper. Our software was specifically designed following ABA principles and favors efficient data entry allowing natural interaction with touch screen interfaces: drag and drop, taps and gestures. Furthermore, it is shared in the public domain.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

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Book part
Publication date: 1 September 2008

Jody Lyneé Madeira

Based on interviews with 27 victims’ family members and survivors, this chapter explores how memory of the Oklahoma City bombing was constructed through participation in…

Abstract

Based on interviews with 27 victims’ family members and survivors, this chapter explores how memory of the Oklahoma City bombing was constructed through participation in groups formed after the bombing and participation in the trials of Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols. It first addresses the efficacy of a collective memory perspective. It then describes the mental context in which interviewees joined groups after the bombing, the recovery functions groups played, and their impact on punishment expectations. Next, it discusses a media-initiated involuntary relationship between McVeigh and interviewees. Finally, this chapter examines execution witnesses’ perceptions of communication with McVeigh in his trial and execution.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-090-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Nelson Oly Ndubisi and Chew Tung Moi

To evaluate the awareness and behaviours of Malaysian consumers towards sales promotional tools such as, coupons, price discount, free samples, bonus packs, and in‐store…

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11246

Abstract

Purpose

To evaluate the awareness and behaviours of Malaysian consumers towards sales promotional tools such as, coupons, price discount, free samples, bonus packs, and in‐store display in the purchase of low involvement products.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper also recognises that certain demographic factors such as education and income of consumers could potentially confound the observed relationships hence, these factors were controlled. A total of 312 consumers in Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia were surveyed using a structured questionnaire.

Findings

The results show that price discounts, free samples, bonus packs, and in‐store display are associated with product trial. Coupons do not have any significant effect on product trial.

Research limitations/implications

Only one category of product was considered. None were high involvement so these need further research.

Practical implications

Greate understanding of how Malaysian customers respond to the various sales promotions therefore increased alitity to pich the appropriate promotional miso.

Originality/value

The level of education appears to have no bearing on consumers’ preferences.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 29 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1999

Janet Hoek

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

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Article
Publication date: 12 November 2013

A. Aissi, S. Bensihamedi, A. Bouafia, A. Saihia and L. Belagra

This paper presents continuous monitoring results of an instrumented embankment behaviour built on compressible soil. In order to better understand of the embankment…

Abstract

This paper presents continuous monitoring results of an instrumented embankment behaviour built on compressible soil. In order to better understand of the embankment behaviour and its foundation, geotechnical investigations, measurements of the monitoring data, interstitial overpressure evolution as well as numerical modelling with soft soil model are analysed. The findings highlight various factors resulting in the failure of the infrastructure. The loading program has proven to be incompatible, which subsequently resulted in an excess of pore pressures. The numerical modelling results have illustrated clearly the behaviour of the embankment particularly, the horizontal displacements and the interstitial overpressure.

Details

World Journal of Engineering, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1708-5284

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Carrie Heilman, Kyryl Lakishyk and Sonja Radas

This paper aims to investigate the impact of in‐store sample promotions of food products on consumer trial and purchasing behavior. The authors investigate differences in…

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4259

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the impact of in‐store sample promotions of food products on consumer trial and purchasing behavior. The authors investigate differences in the trial rate for free samples across different products and consumer types, as well as the impact of sampling on product and category purchase incidence. The results of this study are relevant for retailers and manufacturers who invest in in‐store free sample promotions.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use data from a field study, which leveraged an actual free‐sample program implemented by a US grocery store chain. Data was collected on six different products promoted by in‐store free samples over six different weekends. The data collected included consumers' trial and purchasing behavior with respect to the free sample, as well as their attitudes towards the free sample that day and free sample promotions in general.

Findings

Free sampling is very effective in inducing trial, especially among lower educated consumers. For consumers who are planning to buy the product in the promoted category, free sampling can encourage switching from the planned to the promoted brand. For consumers who do not have such previous plans, free sampling can “draw“ them into the category and encourage category purchase. Samplers' interactions with the person distributing the sample or with other samplers at the scene also seem to boost post‐sample purchase incidence.

Originality/value

Despite the importance of free samples as a promotional tool, few studies have examined consumer trial and purchasing behavior with respect to in‐store free samples. This paper presents one of the first known field studies that examines this topic.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 113 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2018

David H.B. Bednall, Harmen Oppewal, Krongjit Laochumnanvanit and Cuc Nguyen

This paper aims to discover how consumers process an innovative set of systematically varied service trial offers and how this affects their learning and interaction as…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discover how consumers process an innovative set of systematically varied service trial offers and how this affects their learning and interaction as precursors to customer engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

The research uses experiments that manipulate pricing, type of service and delivery method. A repeated-measures design was used with a sample of 396 participants.

Findings

Free (as opposed to cost or full price) service trials were more likely to be accepted, with perceived truthfulness of the trial offer and perceived obligation mediating the relationship. Credence service trials generate higher levels of perceived obligation than experience service trial offers, while personal services are more likely to lead to trial adoption.

Research limitations/implications

The research can be extended to well-recognized brands and further mixed service contexts.

Practical implications

Trial offers of new services are best targeted at buyers who are in the likely buyer group. The trial offer may accelerate time to purchase and relieve perceived risks. The trials of credence services need further signals of quality in the trial itself for consumers to adopt the full service. With personal service trials, skeptical consumers need assurance as to what will happen after the trial experience. Free trials may actually devalue a service, threatening engagement.

Originality/value

Uniquely, service trial offers are systematically manipulated using experience versus credence and personal versus impersonal trials to determine their effect on acceptance of the trial offer and the full service. Additionally, the study compares free, cost price and full price trial offers.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

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