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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Trevor Wood‐Harper and Bob Wood

This paper is intended to pay tribute to the inspiration provided by Rob Kling by showing how his ideas about social informatics in general and the use of web models in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper is intended to pay tribute to the inspiration provided by Rob Kling by showing how his ideas about social informatics in general and the use of web models in particular, have helped us to formulate and develop our own work in the field of information systems development methods.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual discussion and approach are taken.

Findings

Illustrates how Kling's advocacy of the need for a more holistic form of explanation of the behaviour of what he (and Walt Scacchi) termed “computer resources” gave shape to ideas emerging from others' action research studies at that time, and how his attempts to set the agenda for the emerging field of Social Informatics have informed subsequent developments in work in the area of methodological inquiry.

Originality/value

Provides an evaluation of Kling's pioneering and inspirational work on information and communication technologies.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Abstract

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Property Management, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Maria Vakola, Yacine Rezgui and Trevor Wood‐Harper

The paper is based on research carried out within the Condor project funded under the European ESPRIT programme. Condor is a partnership between English, French and…

Abstract

The paper is based on research carried out within the Condor project funded under the European ESPRIT programme. Condor is a partnership between English, French and Swedish construction companies with aims and objectives of defining the working practices, processes, techniques, tools and technical infrastructure to allow the construction industry to progress from its current position towards a large scale, computer integrated industry. The selection, design and implementation of a new information technology system involves inevitably many technical issues but it must also meet user and organisational requirements. A generic model for business process re‐engineering was produced based on research results in order to facilitate Condor’s implementation to participating companies.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 15 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Keith Horton, Elisabeth Davenport and Trevor Wood‐Harper

To provide a view of Rob Kling's contribution to socio‐technical studies of work.

Abstract

Purpose

To provide a view of Rob Kling's contribution to socio‐technical studies of work.

Design/methodology/approach

The five “big ideas” discussed are signature themes in Kling's own work in the informatics domain, and of his intellectual legacy.

Findings

This paper conveys something of Kling's presence in social informatics (SI) thinking by focusing on a number of “big” ideas – “multiple points of view”, “social choices”, “the production lattice” (and its corollary, the problematization of the user), “socio‐technical interaction networks”, and “institutional truth regimes”.

Research limitations/implications

A growing research community has demonstrated the power of SI techniques. It is essential that this body of work is sustained and developed, demonstrating how to undertake investigation and observation, that is not driven by instrumentalism but is informed by and leads to “technological realism”.

Practical implications

The SI corpus, exposing the dangers of naïve instrumentalism as an approach to information systems design and management, can guide practitioners on how to unpack the history of what is in view. This may be a specific technology, a social formation, or a sociotechnical circumstance. Practitioners may draw on the concepts presented, not as a prescriptive toolkit, but rather as a sensitizing frame to assist those who wish to re‐vision the workplace.

Originality/value

Central to the successful utilisation of computers in work, we argue, is the continuing development of a portfolio of interpretive concepts (such as STINs, regimes of truth, production lattices) that can consolidate Rob Kling's “big” ideas that are the core of this paper.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Roberta Lamb and Steve Sawyer

To extend the work of Rob Kling, whose research interests, and advocacy were at the center of a movement in analytical inquiry and empirical research now known as “social…

Abstract

Purpose

To extend the work of Rob Kling, whose research interests, and advocacy were at the center of a movement in analytical inquiry and empirical research now known as “social informatics”.

Design/methodology/approach

Reviews the work of those who engage in social informatics research to strengthen and further the conceptual perspective, analytical approaches, and intellectual contributions of social informatics.

Findings

The vibrant and growing international community of active social informatics scholars has assembled a social informatics resource kit that includes: perspective lenses through which research data can be viewed critically; techniques for building theory and developing models from socially rich empirical data; and a common body of knowledge regarding the uses and effects of ICTs.

Originality/value

The paper identifies opportunities to engage new scholars in social informatics discussions, and suggests new venues for promoting and extending the work of scholars already enrolled in the social informatics movement.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2007

John McManus and Trevor Wood‐Harper

The purpose of this paper is to examine the concept of quality related to the context of software development using the ISO, TickIT and CMM frameworks. The paper also…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the concept of quality related to the context of software development using the ISO, TickIT and CMM frameworks. The paper also seeks to stress the fact that the different perspectives of those involved in software development will influence how quality is seen and measured. In the context of software engineering projects, quality takes on a broad meaning that refers not only to the way in which companies manage software engineering projects, but also to the software development process itself.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach and methodology adopted for this paper were a review of the literature and best practice in software engineering. It is argued that users of software systems are more interested in how easy the software is to use than in the underlying application code that is used to generate the system. Using the body of knowledge that is software quality the basic characteristics of software quality are described and compared in terms of quality standards such as ISO, TickIT and CMM. Each of these standards is decomposed further in order to clarify its usefulness.

Findings

The findings in the paper suggest that, whilst there are many differences in the quality standards used, there are a number of similar characteristics. In essence the underlying philosophies of ISO and CMM have at the core the same goals. Some academics see CMM as being technically over‐engineered; a CMM‐compliant quality system is in many respects far in advance of ISO.

Research limitations/implications

This paper helps define the strengths and weaknesses within ISO, TickIT and CMM from a software engineering practitioner perspective.

Practical implications

The paper shows that software engineers need to pay more attention to the performance and conformance issues in software projects and to be proactive rather than reactive to quality issues.

Originality/value

It may be argued that the importance of this paper lies in the assertion that those engaged in the software engineering are in need of a multi‐perspective view on quality and, with that in mind, this paper should appeal to practitioners and members of the academic community with an interest in software quality.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1988

Croxton + Garry Ltd., have been awarded the BS 5750, Part 2, Certificate for their chalk whiting production facility at Steeple Morden, near Royston, in (South…

Abstract

Croxton + Garry Ltd., have been awarded the BS 5750, Part 2, Certificate for their chalk whiting production facility at Steeple Morden, near Royston, in (South) Cambridgeshire, which produces the Britomya range of chalk whitings.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

Richard L. Baskerville

Action researchers contend that a complex social process can be studied best by introducing changes into that process and observing the effects of these changes. The…

Abstract

Action researchers contend that a complex social process can be studied best by introducing changes into that process and observing the effects of these changes. The approach used by organizational consultants must also introduce change, but in this case, the theoretical development and the rigorous empirical foundation are prerequisite elements of the activity. Participative case studies are a common scientific report proceeding from consulting projects. This paper discusses the contrasts between the action research method, consulting, and participative case studies. Ethical problems arise when action research is knowingly or unknowingly conflated with consultation practices, since this combination makes the usual set of action research dilemmas even more problematic. An improved understanding of the action research‐consulting contrasts aids in distinguishing the contributions of participative case studies to the information systems literature.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Abstract

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Abstract

Details

Property Management, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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