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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 11 July 2017

Monder Ram, Paul Edwards, Trevor Jones and Maria Villares-Varela

The purpose of this paper is to assess ways in which informality can be understood and reviews an emerging area of management scholarship. The origins and nature of informality…

6547

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess ways in which informality can be understood and reviews an emerging area of management scholarship. The origins and nature of informality are discussed with the aid of two different theoretical tools: “workplace sociology” (WS) and “mixed embeddedness” (ME).

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is grounded in empirical material reflecting different aspects of informality mainly within the ethnic economy, such as a study on the implementation of the National Minimum Wage regulations (Ram et al., 2007; Jones et al., 2004, 2006).

Findings

The authors argue that the combination of WS and ME provides a valuable means of content and character of informality. It can also help to explaining variations and patterns within the informal economy, as well as understanding new forms of informality in the ethnic economy and beyond in “superdiverse” contexts.

Originality/value

This paper bridges two different theoretical approaches to explain the interactions between the firm and state regulations, as well as the workplace relations between employer and employees.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 37 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

32

Abstract

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

In the Coen Brothers’ film, O Brother Where Are Thou?, set in depression‐era southern USA, one of the three convicts on the run is thrown out of a Woolworth’s shop and told never…

1868

Abstract

In the Coen Brothers’ film, O Brother Where Are Thou?, set in depression‐era southern USA, one of the three convicts on the run is thrown out of a Woolworth’s shop and told never to come back. “Does this mean I’m banned from just this shop or all Woolworth’s?” Delmar, played by Tim Blake Nelson, worries. The joke reflects the affection that existed then, and does still, for a retailer that is seen by many people as being cheap and cheerful. However, loved or not “Woolies” is in crisis. When Trevor Bish‐Jones was appointed chief executive in March last year he took over a retailer facing huge problems.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Giles Barrett, Trevor Jones, David McEvoy and Chris McGoldrick

Immigrant‐owned business in Britain is reviewed in the light of both cultural and structural economic perspectives. The latter view is emphasised. Concentration in trades which…

2977

Abstract

Immigrant‐owned business in Britain is reviewed in the light of both cultural and structural economic perspectives. The latter view is emphasised. Concentration in trades which are in decline, or are labour intensive, or both, creates acute competitive pressures which are exacerbated by the growing presence of corporate rivals in many markets. Real and perceived bias on the part of banks helps to limit diversification. Attempts to move away from characteristic activities, both geographically and sectorally, have had only limited impact. Accumulation of class resources holds the greatest promise for entrepreneurial success.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 8 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2013

Trevor Jones and Ronald van Steden

The purpose of this paper is to compare the specific institutional arrangements for realizing democratically accountable policing in England & Wales and the Netherlands. It…

1784

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the specific institutional arrangements for realizing democratically accountable policing in England & Wales and the Netherlands. It assesses each accountability system against a set of “democratic criteria” and considers the implications for democratic policing of the current reform trajectories in both jurisdictions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a cross‐national approach exploring the relationship between policing and democratic institutions by comparing the democratic credentials of the police governance systems in England & Wales and the Netherlands.

Findings

Current reforms to the police governance system in England & Wales aim to increase local elected influence over policing. By contrast, the Dutch system deliberately limits the degree of local electoral control over policing. The paper argues that there is a range of elements to democratic policing, and that “democratic accountability” should not be conflated with control of policing by elected bodies. Whilst the trajectories of reform in England & Wales and the Netherlands are going in opposite directions, each raises a number of “democratic” concerns.

Research limitation/implications

The research is limited to only two developed European parliamentary democracies in the European Union. Further comparative research on democratic policing is required to expand the analysis to a wider variety of democratic contexts.

Originality/value

To date, there has been little attention paid by policy makers or by academics to the form and nature of police governance in continental European countries. By drawing comparisons between England & Wales and the Netherlands, the paper aims to provide a democratic assessment of the two police accountability systems (and their current reform trajectories) and discuss some broad policy implications for police governance in each jurisdiction.

Practical implications

Comparative analysis of police accountability in both England and Wales and the Netherlands provides potential for policy learning in each jurisdiction. The analysis suggests that both systems, in different ways, are currently at risk of over‐emphasizing particular democratic criteria (such as electoral participation, or delivery of service) to the exclusion of others (such as concerns with equitable and fair policing and the protection of minority rights).

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1991

Trevor Jones and Helen Macilwaine

Total Quality Management is becoming widely known in health care organisations, and one health authority′s methods of setting up such a scheme is explored. All departments and…

Abstract

Total Quality Management is becoming widely known in health care organisations, and one health authority′s methods of setting up such a scheme is explored. All departments and units were canvassed by letter to contribute ideas and suggestions, and subsequently programmes and agendas were established to implement these.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 4 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1995

Michael Ballé and Trevor Jones

Explains how systems thinking was used to help pull a decisionsupport consultancy through the recession. Through a series ofworkshops, problems were identified and analysed before…

1847

Abstract

Explains how systems thinking was used to help pull a decision support consultancy through the recession. Through a series of workshops, problems were identified and analysed before solutions were generated.

Details

Executive Development, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-3230

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1952

OUR correspondents have commented upon the meagreness of the newspaper attention to the Annual Meeting of the Library Association. The opportunities which the affair would seem to…

Abstract

OUR correspondents have commented upon the meagreness of the newspaper attention to the Annual Meeting of the Library Association. The opportunities which the affair would seem to afford for press comment are probably exaggerated by librarians, who quite naturally think their matters to be of importance. They are, but they have never been spectacular and are not likely to be so. What the modern pressman wants is a story ; he is not often interested in passive matters nowadays, and more than one editor has admitted that he is not concerned with what people say but with what they do. We may console ourselves to some extent by believing that our quiet work is more enduring than much that is greeted with fanfares. Snippets of facts about high issues of books, parsimony, or believed extravagance, are things that do find their way into the small paragraphs of daily papers. These may be good for our movement but there is no certainty that they are. The only sure advertisement of a library, publicly or otherwise maintained, is the quality of the service it can give.

Details

New Library World, vol. 54 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Amy Lynn Maroso

The purpose of this paper is to provide a detailed description of the Illinois Digitization Institute's Basics and Beyond digitization training program and to describe how…

2082

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a detailed description of the Illinois Digitization Institute's Basics and Beyond digitization training program and to describe how successful the project's different training approaches have been.

Design/methodology/approach

The training consists of one‐day workshops, web‐based courses, and web‐based courses plus a hands‐on workshop element. Courses are given at different price points and for different lengths of time. Surveys and quizzes measure how well the participants learn the material.

Findings

As surveys, quiz results, and other data from the courses show, the objective of the project is being accomplished: to present cultural heritage institutions with different types of digitization training to suit their time constraints, budgets, and education needs and produce a new set of professionals who will create successful and long‐lasting digitization projects.

Practical implications

The success of the project shows that participants respond well to different training approaches and these different approaches can be implemented to provide cultural heritage institutions with a wide range of digitization learning options suited to their needs. Such methods can also be used for other types of library and non‐library training.

Originality/value

This is the first time asynchronous but instructor‐led web‐based courses have been used for digitization training, and findings indicate that it has been successful. The outcomes of this training can be useful for institutions interested in how well participants respond to this unique style of training.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Trevor Jones, Monder Ram and Paul Edwards

This paper seeks to examine the influence of the national minimum wage (NMW) in the UK to small business owners operating in the informal economy.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to examine the influence of the national minimum wage (NMW) in the UK to small business owners operating in the informal economy.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the clothing and restaurant sectors as a context, the responses of ethnic minority employers operating in the informal economy are examined in the light of market and regulatory change (notably, the NMW). Case studies are undertaken with 17 business owners and their workers. Given the sensitivity of the information required (reasons for non‐compliance; avoidance strategies; labour use), industry “insiders” were deployed to gain access.

Findings

The findings highlight considerable diversity in employer responses, despite the focus on two comparative narrow market sectors. This has implications for both neo‐liberal approaches to the informal economy, and the so‐called “marginalisation” thesis.

Research limitations/implications

Provides an insight into a neglected segment of the informal economy. Future studies should look at wider range of sectors and compare the experiences of different ethnic minority groups.

Practical implications

This paper demonstrates why extant policy initiatives designed to formalise informal work face major structural barriers. Further, the informal economy is much more widespread than policy discourse suggests, thus accentuating the challenge for policy‐makers.

Originality/value

Extant literature on informal economy tends to be “race‐blind” and rarely linked to the sphere of employment relations. This paper helps to fill both of these gaps.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 26 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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