Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Beatrice Le Pechoux, Trevor J. Little and Thomas L. Honeycutt

This paper follows a previous paper which was published in Volume 5 Number 3 describing how a pattern language focusing on the initial creative phase of the apparel design…

1220

Abstract

This paper follows a previous paper which was published in Volume 5 Number 3 describing how a pattern language focusing on the initial creative phase of the apparel design process can be useful for innovation management. The patterns define the links between marketing and design knowledge, activities, constraints and resources throughout the process to optimise its efficiency, effectiveness, and the market success of its end‐products. Developing the pattern language involved identifying marketing and design components that are crucial in the initial creative phase of apparel design, and setting them into a model indicating their links to each other and to each of the process stages. The model developed provides a generic framework, or archetype, of apparel design creativity, which is presented in its pattern format in this paper. A total of 14 other patterns were developed around this archetype to grasp its dynamics by defining the links that support and articulate its structure, stages and components. The initial working model of the pattern language was distributed to six design experts for input. Their feedback was analysed, synthesised and integrated into a refined and validated version of the pattern language.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Timothy G. Clapp, Trevor J. Little, Theresa M. Thiel and Dianna J. Vass

Reports research into developing the ability to sense characteristic information about fabric/machine interactions for real‐time control of the industrial sewing process…

Abstract

Reports research into developing the ability to sense characteristic information about fabric/machine interactions for real‐time control of the industrial sewing process. The sewing system under investigation was equipped with displacement and force transducers to measure the dynamic response of the feeding system during various modes of operation. A combination of fabric and machine factors was considered in a one‐half fractional factorial experimental design, including: fabric type, number of fabric plies, presser foot type, presser foot preload, and machine speed.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 4 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Beatrice Le Pechoux and Trevor J. Little

The apparel design process involves gathering and analysing information on fashion trends, markets and past line sales and editing ideas for successful combinations of…

Abstract

The apparel design process involves gathering and analysing information on fashion trends, markets and past line sales and editing ideas for successful combinations of fabric, style and price. These ideas are the result of creativity. Creativity is most often modelled as a problem‐solving process involving complex chaotic systems. In the fields of architecture and software design, pattern languages have been developed to help understand the various fundamental components and dynamics of complex systems by using a series of related generic problem‐solving patterns empirically proven to be successful in a specified context of forces. Patterns record existing knowledge to make it rapidly and easily accessible and communicated between different users. A pattern language for the apparel design process could channel creative efforts and enhance communication between design team members by providing them with a common working language. Furthermore, pattern languages are increasingly used in the design of software and user‐interface programs (Booch 1996; Gamma et al. 1994). Preparing the ground by developing a pattern language for apparel products could save resources and time as well as improve the quality of future customised information.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

Carol G. Carrere and Trevor J. Little

Like most industries that adopt a reactive manufacturing strategy, the clothing industry changes only when external forces dictate that the current approach or strategy…

Abstract

Like most industries that adopt a reactive manufacturing strategy, the clothing industry changes only when external forces dictate that the current approach or strategy will no longer satisfy the prevailing business environment. This paper presents a case study of the modular manufacturing system and discusses the underlying premises that support the success of modular manufacturing both in the formative stages and during sustained operation. A review of the known origins of modular manufacturing illustrates how this production system can be used to advantage for clothing manufacture. Modular is the apparel industry's attempt to optimise the social and technical components of a Sociotechnical System (STS). No single solution fits all products/tasks in fully optimising STS, given different technologies, environment and people, etc. Consistent with the requirements for STS, the authors have formed five conclusive statements regarding the characteristics of modular manufacturing for apparel.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

George K. Stylios

Examines the tenth published year of the ITCRR. Runs the whole gamut of textile innovation, research and testing, some of which investigates hitherto untouched aspects…

3063

Abstract

Examines the tenth published year of the ITCRR. Runs the whole gamut of textile innovation, research and testing, some of which investigates hitherto untouched aspects. Subjects discussed include cotton fabric processing, asbestos substitutes, textile adjuncts to cardiovascular surgery, wet textile processes, hand evaluation, nanotechnology, thermoplastic composites, robotic ironing, protective clothing (agricultural and industrial), ecological aspects of fibre properties – to name but a few! There would appear to be no limit to the future potential for textile applications.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2010

Muditha M. Senanayake and Trevor J. Little

Mass customization (MC) is one of the changes for the US apparel industry that will provide a competitive advantage and offer products needed by consumers. However, as the…

5359

Abstract

Purpose

Mass customization (MC) is one of the changes for the US apparel industry that will provide a competitive advantage and offer products needed by consumers. However, as the points of customization and their extent of customization characterize business models including the process strategies to achieve a successful MC strategy, it is imperative to define the points of customization. The purpose of this research is to investigate and introduce the critical points of customization and their extent for apparel.

Design/methodology/approach

An apparel industry survey together with case studies was used to collect information to test and support the hypothesis developed through the comprehensive literature review.

Findings

Five critical points of apparel customization are defined. These points and their extents of customization are compared, analyzed and validated. It is suggested that the success and the capability of apparel MC will depend on how effectively a company can combine the defined points of customization and their extent of customization in pre‐production, production and post‐production of the apparel product.

Research limitations/implications

The research findings of points of customization is for an apparel product. However, the concepts may be applied to products in other industries.

Practical implications

The post‐production customization point using current technologies is a popular practice for mass customization. However, to achieve a higher level or extent of customization such as design point of customization, it is essential to use advanced product development, manufacturing and processing technologies.

Originality/value

The points of apparel customization and their extent of customization have not been studied before for the apparel MC domain. These points and extent of customization provide new insights into the mass customized apparel manufacturing and apparel MC business models.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 November 2008

George K. Stylios

Examines the fourteenth published year of the ITCRR. Runs the whole gamut of textile innovation, research and testing, some of which investigates hitherto untouched…

1180

Abstract

Examines the fourteenth published year of the ITCRR. Runs the whole gamut of textile innovation, research and testing, some of which investigates hitherto untouched aspects. Subjects discussed include cotton fabric processing, asbestos substitutes, textile adjuncts to cardiovascular surgery, wet textile processes, hand evaluation, nanotechnology, thermoplastic composites, robotic ironing, protective clothing (agricultural and industrial), ecological aspects of fibre properties – to name but a few! There would appear to be no limit to the future potential for textile applications.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Traci May‐Plumlee and Trevor J. Little

This paper presents a model for an effective product development process, which is now becoming increasingly critical to success of apparel firms.

5068

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents a model for an effective product development process, which is now becoming increasingly critical to success of apparel firms.

Design/methodology/approach

This research modeled apparel product development as a market driven process and integrated the consumer purchase decision in the model of proactive product development integrating consumer requirements (PPDICR). The PPDICR links the consumer purchase decision and multiple consumer research strategies to specific stages of the no‐interval coherently phased product development model for apparel through 15 avenues of consumer input.

Findings

The PPDICR model contributes to our understanding on how consumer input can be used to facilitate the process and through what avenues that input may be acquired. This model provides an effective tool for intra‐company to inter‐business analysis of consumer input into the apparel product development process.

Research limitations/implications

The PPDICR provides a theoretical understanding of apparel production, and is useful to researchers in visualizing the impact of changes in the business environment, integrating research projects, and establishing research priorities.

Practical implications

Practitioners may use the model to improve and develop products, select appropriate consumer input, and strategically plan organizational changes.

Originality/value

This model is a useful tool for effective product development both for researchers and industrialists alike. It brings in the important element of the integration of consumer information.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

George K. Stylios

Examines the seventeenth published year of the ITCRR. Runs the whole gamut of textile innovation, research and testing, some of which investigates hitherto untouched…

Abstract

Examines the seventeenth published year of the ITCRR. Runs the whole gamut of textile innovation, research and testing, some of which investigates hitherto untouched aspects. Subjects discussed include cotton fabric processing, asbestos substitutes, textile adjuncts to cardiovascular surgery, wet textile processes, hand evaluation, nanotechnology, thermoplastic composites, robotic ironing, protective clothing (agricultural and industrial), ecological aspects of fibre properties – to name but a few! There would appear to be no limit to the future potential for textile applications.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 November 2011

George K. Stylios

Examines the sixteenth published year of the ITCRR. Runs the whole gamut of textile innovation, research and testing, some of which investigates hitherto untouched…

Abstract

Examines the sixteenth published year of the ITCRR. Runs the whole gamut of textile innovation, research and testing, some of which investigates hitherto untouched aspects. Subjects discussed include cotton fabric processing, asbestos substitutes, textile adjuncts to cardiovascular surgery, wet textile processes, hand evaluation, nanotechnology, thermoplastic composites, robotic ironing, protective clothing (agricultural and industrial), ecological aspects of fibre properties – to name but a few! There would appear to be no limit to the future potential for textile applications.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 1000