Search results

1 – 10 of 10
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 May 2018

Trevor Gerhardt and Linda Mackenzie-Philps

Programmes and courses integrating learning and work, captured generally in this paper as work integrated learning (WIL), usually provide flexible and innovative learning…

Abstract

Purpose

Programmes and courses integrating learning and work, captured generally in this paper as work integrated learning (WIL), usually provide flexible and innovative learning opportunities. In a digital age, information and communication technologies (ICTs) can be vital in delivering and enhancing such hybrid forms of WIL. The purpose of this paper is to explore the correlation and trajectory of ICT use among priests in the Church of England in the various forms of WIL.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study explores ICT use among a sample of Church of England priests by examining initially their use of virtual learning environments (VLEs) such as Blackboard and Moodle in work-based learning (WBL); and assessing the trajectory and correlation to work-related learning (WRL) through their use of social networking/engagement tools such as Facebook and Twitter in continuing professional development courses (CPD). The correlation and trajectory is provided through a document analysis of VLE access and a survey questionnaire.

Findings

Priests in WBL and priests engaged in WRL (i.e. CPD courses) revealed a correlation in the lack of ICT pervasiveness. With only a minority of priests engaging in further higher education (HE), the familiarity and use of ICT such as VLE platforms stagnated or declined. Correlated with social networking/engagement, priests overwhelmingly cited the “lack of time” as a reason not to engage with social media, however, ICT reluctance caused by fear was the trajectory resulting in a further lack of “ICT pervasiveness”.

Research limitations/implications

While results may be generalisable among Church of England priests and other faith communities internationally, due to its unique and distinctive parameters, it is not generalisable to the general mature student adult education population.

Practical implications

The case study highlighted that continued intentional familiarisation and use of ICT within the various forms of WIL programmes and courses among “non-digital natives” would enhance learning. Such learning in WIL would be beneficial for HE programmes addressing e-readiness as a priority.

Social implications

Specific to the sample case study, considering the importance of community engagement and WIL, this study highlights the challenges and changes required for improved social capital within the field of ICT and adult education.

Originality/value

No studies have considered the training and education of priests as a WIL case study of ICT “pervasiveness” and self-efficacy.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 December 2019

Trevor Gerhardt

An analysis is conducted on the implementation of Capstone Projects (CAPP) at a private business college in the UK as part of their work-based learning (WBL) strategy…

Abstract

Purpose

An analysis is conducted on the implementation of Capstone Projects (CAPP) at a private business college in the UK as part of their work-based learning (WBL) strategy. CAPP are introduced for the first time in this college in the Autumn semester of 2017. The purpose of this paper is to study the continuity and impact of WBL through the CAPP.

Design/methodology/approach

Comparative data of student experience were collected and analysed from online polls throughout the Autumn and following Summer semester webinar lectures and a content analysis of formative assessment work included in the final submissions.

Findings

Data indicated that recommended changes after the Autumn semester were only partially successful by the Summer semester and that the continuity of the key pedagogical strategies identified in the Autumn semester were still noticed and mentioned (implicitly and explicitly) in the following Summer semester. Data indicated that the CAPP was a rewarding challenge, that the process of using a webinar was an appreciated and effective process overall and that good supervision made a significant impact on the success of the process.

Research limitations/implications

The implication of the research is that it indicates student experience from the application of WBL in the CAPP process.

Practical implications

Key future recommendations addressing improvements were mainly focussed upon the programme administration.

Originality/value

The work adds to a minimal amount of research on WBL within CAPP in the UK and adds to the knowledge within the field of WBL.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 21 January 2019

Trevor Gerhardt

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the impact of an action research intervention during a work-based learning (WBL) project among human resource management (HRM…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the impact of an action research intervention during a work-based learning (WBL) project among human resource management (HRM) students at a business college in London. The intervention was the researcher’s meeting with the nominated group leaders to facilitate reflection on their leadership and instil confidence.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on an action research leadership intervention on a broader undergraduate WBL module taught across nine disciplines and numerous projects. The action learning involved the phases of action, reflection, learning and planning. The sample was five group leaders on one of the projects for HRM students. A content analysis of their assessment submissions was included in the reflection, learning and planning phases.

Findings

Based on a content analysis, most of the group leaders acknowledged the leadership intervention in their submissions in varying degrees of quantity and quality. The findings reflect the impact of the intervention upon leadership confidence and the application of theory on practice. Specific leadership input would enhance the impact. The intervention did address confidence which impacted self-directed learning.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited to a specific context and small sample. It is limited by the fact that reflective assessment work could not be used in comparison with the project assessment submissions.

Practical implications

The research demonstrates directly from the assessed submissions of students the benefit of WBL with a specific focus on confidence, leadership, reflection and self-directed learning. It demonstrates as an example the application of action research on a small WBL sample.

Social implications

The research is the evidence of the importance of leadership and confidence among mature adults in WBL contexts.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrates the impact of WBL on the learning of mature adults and, furthermore, the impact of a leadership intervention on the motivation of students for self-directed learning.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 August 2019

Tony Wall

Abstract

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1963

Milk, the universally perfect food, its compositional quality and bacteriological purity causing few qualms nowadays in this country and outbreaks of milk‐borne disease…

Abstract

Milk, the universally perfect food, its compositional quality and bacteriological purity causing few qualms nowadays in this country and outbreaks of milk‐borne disease relatively rare, it may come as a surprise that there is another aspect of milk consumption causing discussion and not a little controversy in medical circles. There is an increasing awareness of milk allergy in infancy and in certain adult disorders, evidenced less by serological tests than by the relief afforded by milk‐free diets and the return of symptoms on the re‐institution of a milk diet. Skin tests also are not particularly reliable but the serological tests have at least demonstrated anti‐bodies to milk proteins in most artificially fed babies after the age of seven weeks (Gunther, M. et al, 1960).

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 65 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1963

For many years now food and drugs authorities (and the public) have been complaining about the low meat content of meat pies on sale and the need of a standard is…

Abstract

For many years now food and drugs authorities (and the public) have been complaining about the low meat content of meat pies on sale and the need of a standard is self‐evident. The pie filling is not visible to the purchaser and often consists of a mixture of meat and cereal from the appearance of which it is impossible to assess the amount of meat present. The sale of made up cooked foods has increased among all such products in recent years, but for meat pies the increase has been phenomenal.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 65 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1964

The rearing of food animals by intensive factory methods has received a great deal of publicity in recent months. This has induced the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries…

Abstract

The rearing of food animals by intensive factory methods has received a great deal of publicity in recent months. This has induced the Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food to set up a technical committee to examine the conditions in which livestock are raised and kept under systems of intensive husbandry, and to advise if standards should be set in the interests of their welfare. He announced this in Parliament on April 20 and hoped soon to name the chairman and other members of the committee. The committee will quickly note that most criticism has been directed at what many regard as inhumane methods, most of this coming from the heart rather than the head. Battery hens, fooled by changing periods of electric light, have increased their laying and since the broiler industry exploded into the food market only a few years ago, the small seasonal trade has become an all‐the‐year round trade of 100 million birds, a prodigious output that is still rising. This mass production of white meat had already made similar strides in the U.S.A. and a few continental countries a few years previously. Its commercial success, however, is undoubtedly due to the economics of the trade; that it is possible to sell poultry of relatively small size and uniform quality as cheap, or even cheaper, than butchers' meat. All this tends to encourage the application of the same intensive methods of production in the meat trade. Anything that can increase the amount of first‐class animal protein in a world rapidly growing short of it and at lower prices merits more than a sentimental appraisal.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 66 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Robert L. Laud and Matthew Johnson

The purpose of this investigation is to identify and examine the tactics and upward mobility strategies utilized by individuals who advanced into leadership positions.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this investigation is to identify and examine the tactics and upward mobility strategies utilized by individuals who advanced into leadership positions.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on both narrative, consensual qualitative research (CQR) and empirical research, the authors conducted in‐depth interviews with 187 leaders from 136 organizations.

Findings

This study offers an elaboration on the interrelatedness of career tactics and presents a typology based upon the ranking, bundling and utilization of selected tactics by organization leaders. The analysis produced a framework of four strategic categories: foundation strategies, building self‐brand, being centered and seizing opportunity. The results suggest that the utilization of these strategies is likely to influence career advancement.

Research limitations/implications

This study was confined to individuals who had achieved high level positions which may limit the ability to generalize.

Practical implications

Organization players will benefit by leveraging the upward mobility typology and recognizing the value of proactive preparedness and career self‐management. Inclusion of this tactical framework will also enhance the effectiveness of organization leadership, mentoring and career counseling programs.

Originality/value

The value of this study is twofold. First, it contributes to understanding of advancement tactics in the limited, and often inconclusive, research on upward mobility and predeterminants. Second, it underscores the importance of career tactics in the thought processes of career aspirants faced with a hypercompetitive market.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 August 2019

Hyojeong Lee, Kiseong Kim and Yejin Lee

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effects of wearing compression pants of varying pressure levels on the wearer’s attention/concentration to investigate the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effects of wearing compression pants of varying pressure levels on the wearer’s attention/concentration to investigate the appropriate level of compression for sport performance and confirm whether this methodology is feasible as a means of evaluating sportswear functionality.

Design/methodology/approach

After wearing compression pants of varying compression levels, spontaneous potentials were analyzed by calculating the spontaneous electroencephalography (EEG) indices: relative low beta (RLB) power spectrum ((12~15 Hz)/(4~50 Hz)), relative mid beta (RMB) power spectrum ((15~20 Hz)/(4~50 Hz)), and ratio of sensory motor rhythm to theta waves ((12~15 Hz)/(4~8 Hz)). The activation of brain waves was mapped and visualized from EEG data using BioScan-Map (BioBrain Inc., Daejeon, Korea).

Findings

The influence of pressure levels on brain waves was confirmed: RLB power, RMB power and RST varied by experimental clothing. CP3, the compression pants that applied moderate pressure (1.57±0.41 kPa), was associated with a relatively higher level of attention/concentration – i.e., the results confirmed that sports compression pants that apply approximately 1.0~2.0 kPa to the area between the thighs and shins are improve attention/concentration. It was further confirmed that EEG is a useful tool for evaluating the psychophysiological effects of functional apparel.

Originality/value

Unlike preceding studies that considered only alpha waves and the effects of clothing on comfort, this study investigated the influence of compression garments on attention/concentration.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

1 – 10 of 10