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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1999

Rachel Phillips, Kevin Neailey and Trevor Broughton

Some companies to aid the product development process have implemented a stage‐gate framework, as a high‐level representation of the activities required. Such a framework…

Abstract

Some companies to aid the product development process have implemented a stage‐gate framework, as a high‐level representation of the activities required. Such a framework allows the development process to be closely monitored and controlled, using stages of work and review gates. Six different companies have been examined to show the variations in representation. Each approach was compared to a generic four‐staged framework. Companies which are organised mainly in cross‐functional teams adhere strongly to the four stages, namely a low‐phased approach. However, companies organised with a strong functional structure tend to have more phases and gates within each stage, i.e. a high‐phased approach. These additional phases tend to be placed late in the product development process rather than at the start where their effect would be greater. A generic representation of the product development process applicable to various organisations and industrial sectors, provides an architecture for carrying out any business process improvement project.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Abstract

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 73 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Abstract

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 73 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 74 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Book part
Publication date: 14 January 2019

Adrian Wheeler

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Writing for the Media
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-614-9

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2019

Vasiliki Bozani, Nick Drydakis, Katerina Sidiropoulou, Benjamin Harvey and Anna Paraskevopoulou

The purpose of this paper is to provide empirical patterns regarding trans people’s self-esteem-oriented evaluations during observations of positive workplace actions. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide empirical patterns regarding trans people’s self-esteem-oriented evaluations during observations of positive workplace actions. The case of a 2015 UK workplace guide is utilized to fulfil the aims. The guide provides suggestions to employers for recruiting and retaining trans people.

Design/methodology/approach

A new questionnaire is created which forms a 20-item scale capturing a variety of self-evaluations. Trans people provided their responses in a 2018–2019 survey and the study’s patterns were captured.

Findings

The outcomes suggest that trans people’s self-esteem and self-respect are enhanced by policy makers’ positive actions to promote inclusivity in the workplace. In addition, due to these actions trans people feel more accepted, valued and trusted by the government. The authors suggest that a lack of positive workplace actions may be detrimental to trans people’s self-esteem. However, if a workplace policy is perceived to be a recognition of trans people’s worth this may be internalized, resulting in positive self-evaluations. The authors suggest that the 2015 workplace guide aims to ensure that trans people’s self-expressions are not constrained in ways that could cause them self-esteem difficulties.

Practical implications

The study also finds that firms which have implemented the workplace guide have informed human resources strategies, affected corporate profiles and staff organizational behaviours, created a more inclusive workplace culture, and addressed LGBT business and trans staff members’ needs. The authors suggest that when employers utilize policy makers’ positive workplace policies they may be able to realize positive organizational outcomes in their firms.

Social implications

The World Health Organization perceives self-esteem as a public matter and this study suggests that inclusive workplace strategies can positively affect the psychological states of a highly marginalized population group.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge this is the first attempt to quantify how a workplace guide impacts on self-esteem-oriented evaluations among trans people. Each one of the 20 items in the scale brings new insights into the subject matter.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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