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Book part
Publication date: 8 August 2005

Christine Gagliardi

Medical and legal records of 64 inmates receiving mental health services at a maximum-security prison located in the Northeast United States were examined to look at…

Abstract

Medical and legal records of 64 inmates receiving mental health services at a maximum-security prison located in the Northeast United States were examined to look at whether prison adjustment is impacted by housing in a mental health residential treatment unit. Inmates in the residential treatment unit, the “treatment group” had a significant decrease in hospitalizations and disciplinary reports while housed in the residential treatment unit. Inmates with a mental health history housed in the general population, the “control group,” did not show a decrease in these behaviors during a similar time period. Results find that inmates referred to the residential treatment unit seem to have high numbers of hospitalizations and segregations while housed in the general population, which level off and become similar to the control group upon entry to the residential treatment unit. Implications for future research evaluating the impact of the residential treatment unit on the behavior of the inmate after he has left the unit are discussed.

Details

The Organizational Response to Persons with Mental Illness Involved with the Criminal Justice System
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-231-3

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Article
Publication date: 28 July 2021

Tara Rava Zolnikov, Michael Hammel, Frances Furio and Brandon Eggleston

Dual diagnosis is a term that describes the co-occurrence of mental health disorders or illness and substance use or abuse disorders. Because this co-occurrence results in…

Abstract

Purpose

Dual diagnosis is a term that describes the co-occurrence of mental health disorders or illness and substance use or abuse disorders. Because this co-occurrence results in multiple diseases, layers of treatment are often needed to successfully create positive change in the individual. The purpose of this study is to explore factors of treatment that could facilitate improvements in functionality and quality of life for those with a dual diagnosis.

Design/methodology/approach

A secondary data analysis, using both quantitative and qualitative data, was completed. Secondary analysis is an empirical exercise that applies the same basic research principles as studies using primary data and has steps to be followed, including the evaluative and procedural steps commonly associated with secondary data analysis. Documentation data from the intensive mobile psychosocial assertive community treatment program was gathered for this analysis; this program was used because of the intensive and community-based services provided to patients with a dual diagnosis.

Findings

The major findings from this secondary analysis suggested that significant barriers included “denial” (e.g. evasion, suspension or avoidance of internal awareness) of diagnoses, complicated treatment and other barriers related to housing. Ultimately, these findings provided greater insight into potential effective treatment interventions for people living with a dual diagnosis.

Originality/value

This study adds to the growing body of literature showing that patient-centered care allows for more effective treatment and ultimately, improved health outcomes.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2021

Anneke van Wamel, Ankie Lempens and Arjen Neven

Many clients who suffer from severe mental health problems also struggle with alcohol and drug use. And although there seems to be a consensus in most European countries…

Abstract

Purpose

Many clients who suffer from severe mental health problems also struggle with alcohol and drug use. And although there seems to be a consensus in most European countries that integrated treatment models (especially the integrated treatment of dual disorder clients model) are best fitted to help these clients, none of these have strong evidence, mostly owing to methodological limitations in the studies. This study aims to contribute to the knowledge of why integrated treatment is helpful by conducting in-depth interviews with dual disorder clients who are currently receiving integrated treatment.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is a qualitative thematic analysis using a timeline tool to elicit participants’ responses. In the interviews, dual diagnosis clients with severe problems reflected on their situation at admission, the care they received in integrated treatment and their opinions on positive and negative elements. The interviews were coded and analysed with MAXQDA.

Findings

In the analyses of the interviews, this study found three clusters of elements that clients indicated were the most helpful during their treatment and recovery process: trusting and meaningful relationship with the team, components of integrated treatment and organisation of care.

Originality/value

The findings emphasized the importance of working relationship in the treatment of complex and long-term problems. This has implications for the evaluation of these integrated treatment models which so far mainly focuses on specific interventions.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2021

Thomas Nally, Jane L. Ireland, Leah Greenwood, Carol A. Ireland and Philip Birch

This study aims to explore the impact of inclusion of victim empathy-based content in offender treatment.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the impact of inclusion of victim empathy-based content in offender treatment.

Design/methodology/approach

This study first presents a systematic review of 20 papers before proceeding to consider qualitative interviews with therapists (n = 7) and forensic patients (n = 5), who had completed a long-term violence therapy (Life Minus Violence – Enhanced, LMV-E©). The research explored perceptions of forensic patients and treatment facilitators when completing victim empathy work and explored any negative effects this may have.

Findings

Findings from the systematic review indicated five themes: interventions incorporating victim empathy can be effective; there are positive risk-understanding consequences from completing victim empathy work; offenders perceive victim empathy positively; the emotional impact of victim empathy work on offenders’ is poorly explored; and completing victim empathy in treatment groups receives mixed evaluations from offenders. The systematic review was used to inform the interview themes for the resulting qualitative study with facilitators and forensic patients. This study indicated six themes: victim empathy content facilitates change; victim empathy content can be difficult for patients; victim empathy content can lead to an emotional response; victim empathy content can be beneficial, with the process important; victim empathy content can help understand risk, and patients’ experience of treatment begins before attending sessions.

Practical implications

The potential impact of victim empathy content needs to be evaluated before sessions are completed, accounting for client expectations and treatment readiness. This should include ensuring that appropriate support is in place. Any support provided to patients should be regularly reviewed.

Originality/value

The study represents the first to apply detailed analysis to this topic area and with a complex group.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

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Article
Publication date: 14 July 2021

Nienke Verstegen, Wineke Smid and Jolijn van der Schoot

Forensic psychiatric treatment is aimed at reducing violence risk factors (Bonta and Andrews, 2017) and achieving positive, prosocial life goals (Willis et al., 2013)…

Abstract

Purpose

Forensic psychiatric treatment is aimed at reducing violence risk factors (Bonta and Andrews, 2017) and achieving positive, prosocial life goals (Willis et al., 2013). Drama education can be provided as part of this treatment, but the evidence base is scarce. Therefore, the present study aims to provide insight into experiences with drama education as part of forensic psychiatric treatment.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study was conducted, based on participant observation and 16 interviews, to explore the experiences of patients and treatment providers with drama education during forensic psychiatric treatment. Analyses were conducted following the consensual qualitative research method (Hill et al., 1997).

Findings

The five central themes that emerged from the analysis were knowledge, happiness, excellence in play, community and staff-patient hierarchy. Participants reported that they enjoyed the drama lessons, appreciated the group atmosphere and were able to practice their social-emotional skills. Furthermore, patients and their treatment providers became better acquainted with each other because the power differences between patients and staff decreased during the drama lessons.

Practical implications

Drama education can be considered a useful part of clinical forensic psychiatric treatment, given the positive experience of participants and its perceived positive impact on treatment.

Originality/value

This was one of the first studies to examine the influence that drama education may have on forensic psychiatric treatment. Four of the five themes were in line with the good lives model (Willis et al., 2013), indicating that drama education fulfiled basic human needs or “primary goods” that are important to address in forensic psychiatric treatment, as it decreases the need to compensate these goods with criminal behaviour.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2021

Hirotaka Fushiya, Tomoki Kitamura and Munenori Nakasato

This study aims to investigate the impact of interest rates, the underlying asset and investment experience on the investment behavior of Japanese retail investors toward…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the impact of interest rates, the underlying asset and investment experience on the investment behavior of Japanese retail investors toward structured products (SPs).

Design/methodology/approach

Three treatments are constructed through internet-based survey experiments: interest rate, underlying asset framing and investment experience treatments. The interest rate treatment includes high- and low-interest rate environments. The underlying asset framing treatment includes equity and foreign exchange rates for the SP. The investment experience treatment includes experienced and inexperienced respondents for SPs.

Findings

The main finding of this study concerns the effect of the interaction between low-interest rates and investment experience. Specifically, SP-experienced investors tend to choose SPs in a low-interest rate environment and prefer equity-linked SPs, even though such SPs are overpriced. This finding is useful for financial regulators in formulating policies that protect retail SP investors in low-interest rate environments worldwide.

Originality/value

This study is the first to measure the sensitivities of investment behavior regarding the relative attractiveness of SPs to low-risk straight bonds, given interest rates, the underlying asset and investment experience. It provides evidence to support the development of SP regulations.

Details

The Journal of Risk Finance, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1526-5943

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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2021

Jennifer Seddon, Sarah Wadd, Lawrie Elliott and Iolo Madoc-Jones

No studies have evaluated the relationship between cognitive impairment and alcohol treatment outcomes amongst older drinkers. This study aims to explore the extent of…

Abstract

Purpose

No studies have evaluated the relationship between cognitive impairment and alcohol treatment outcomes amongst older drinkers. This study aims to explore the extent of cognitive impairment amongst older adults seeking alcohol treatment and examine the relationship between cognitive impairment, treatment retention and alcohol use following treatment.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used data from the Drink Wise Age Well programme; an alcohol intervention service for older adults (aged 50+). The Montreal Cognitive Assessment was used to screen for cognitive impairment; alcohol use was assessed using the alcohol use disorders identification test.

Findings

In total, 531 participants completed the assessment at treatment entry. Over half the sample were male (57%), with a mean age of 60 years (Standard deviation: 7.09). Almost half (48.4%) had cognitive impairment at the entry to treatment: 51.6% had a normal cognitive function, 41.4% had mild cognitive impairment, 5.8% had moderate cognitive impairment and 1.1% had severe cognitive impairment. Cognitive impairment was not associated with increased treatment drop-out and was not predictive of alcohol use following treatment. Alcohol treatment was associated with a significant improvement in cognitive functioning.

Originality/value

This study suggests there may be a significant amount of unidentified cognitive impairment amongst older adults attending alcohol treatment. Assessment and routine screening for cognitive impairment in drug and alcohol services may help in care planning and setting treatment goals; in the absence of routine screening opportunities for treatment planning and intervention may be missed.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 21 May 2021

Lourah M. Kelly, Cory A. Crane, Kristyn Zajac and Caroline J. Easton

Past studies demonstrated the efficacy of integrated cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for substance use disorder (SUD) and intimate partner violence (IPV) as well as…

Abstract

Purpose

Past studies demonstrated the efficacy of integrated cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for substance use disorder (SUD) and intimate partner violence (IPV) as well as high rates of depressive symptoms in this population. However, little is known about how depressive symptoms impact treatment outcomes. The authors hypothesized that integrated CBT, but not standard drug counseling (DC), would buffer the negative effects of depressive symptoms on treatment response.

Design/methodology/approach

A secondary analysis of a randomized trial compared men assigned to 12 weeks of integrated CBT for SUD and IPV (n = 29) to those in DC (n = 34).

Findings

Most (60%) of the sample reported any depressive symptoms. Controlling for baseline IPV, reporting any depressive symptoms was associated with more positive cocaine screens during treatment. Among men with depressive symptoms, integrated CBT but not DC was associated with fewer positive cocaine screens. Controlling for baseline alcohol variables, integrated CBT and depressive symptoms were each associated with less aggression outside of intimate relationships (family, strangers, etc.) during treatment. For men without depressive symptoms, integrated CBT was associated with less non-IPV aggression compared to DC. Effects were not significant for other substances, IPV, or at follow-up.

Research limitations/implications

This study found some evidence for differential response to CBT by depressive symptoms on cocaine and aggression at end of treatment, which did not persist three months later. Future studies should explore mechanisms of integrated CBT for SUD and IPV, including mood regulation, on depressive symptoms in real-world samples.

Practical implications

Integrated CBT buffered depressive symptoms’ impact on cocaine use, yet only improved non-IPV aggression in men without depressive symptoms.

Originality/value

Although integrated CBT’s efficacy for improving SUD and IPV has been established, moderators of treatment response have not been investigated.

Details

Advances in Dual Diagnosis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0972

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2009

Steffen Jöhncke

This article discusses drug use treatment as a particular, indispensable institution in the political and cultural imagination of contemporary welfare societies. It is…

Abstract

This article discusses drug use treatment as a particular, indispensable institution in the political and cultural imagination of contemporary welfare societies. It is argued that the existence and funding of treatment is legitimate less on grounds of what it produces in terms of improvements to drug users' lives, and more as a politically and culturally suitable form of organizing the relationship between drug using and non‐using sections of the population. In this regard the analytical concept of treamentality ‐ a term formed as a combination of ‘treatment’ and the Foucauldian notion of ‘governmentality’ ‐ is suggested to help focus on how treatment has become the ‘obvious’ way to address certain problems of certain people.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Eleni Theodosi and Mary McMurran

Sex offenders who refuse a place on a sex offender treatment programme are estimated to make up about half the prison sex offender population in England and Wales. It is…

Abstract

Sex offenders who refuse a place on a sex offender treatment programme are estimated to make up about half the prison sex offender population in England and Wales. It is important to motivate refusers to participate in treatment to reduce the likelihood of their re‐offending. In this pilot study we used the Personal Concerns Inventory‐Offender Adaptation (PCI‐OA), a semi‐structured motivational assessment, further adapting it for treatment refusers. We examined the effectiveness of the PCI‐OA (TR) with nine prisoners who had refused sex offender treatment (the treatment group) compared with nine refusers who received no intervention (the control group). The treatment group were at least 0.6 times as likely to show a positive motivational shift towards sex offender treatment as the untreated group. The practice implications of these results are discussed, and further evaluation of the PCI‐OA (TR) is recommended.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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