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Book part
Publication date: 28 September 2016

David Koffman

To explore how the rise of Transportation Network Companies (TNCs) may affect paratransit.

Abstract

Purpose

To explore how the rise of Transportation Network Companies (TNCs) may affect paratransit.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of published material and interviews with paratransit managers.

Findings

TNCs, typified by Uber and Lyft, are having a significant impact on the taxi industry, which is affecting some US paratransit programs for people with disabilities because it limits the ability of those programs to partner with taxis for a portion of their service. However, some programs have avoided these negative impacts by contracting with taxi companies in a way that provides guaranteed work for some number of drivers.

Paratransit programs might be able to partner with TNCs much as they do now with taxis. However, a number of significant issues would have to be addressed including the lack of any way to schedule a trip in advance, little or no monitoring or dispatching assistance provided to drivers at the time of service, insurance coverage that does not meet typical public agency requirements for contracts, limited screening of drivers or inspection of vehicles, lack of specialized driver training, lack of any provision to negotiate rates, and lack of wheelchair accessible vehicles.

US civil rights legislation applies to TNCs and requires them to serve individuals with disabilities who can use the service; assist with the stowing of mobility devices; not charge higher fares or fees for people with disabilities; and allow service animals.

Originality/value

The value is to help paratransit programs and policy makers adapt to changes in the market for transportation services brought on by technology.

Details

Paratransit: Shaping the Flexible Transport Future
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-225-5

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Dyah Mutiarin, Achmad Nurmandi, Hazel Jovita, Mukti Fajar and Yao-Nan Lien

This paper aims to explore the dynamic context of the sharing economy in the transportation sector. This paper looks into the development of government regulations on the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the dynamic context of the sharing economy in the transportation sector. This paper looks into the development of government regulations on the growing business of transportation network companies in Indonesia, the Philippines (represented as middle-income countries) and Taiwan (high-income country). How do government regulations and policies respond to the growing online-enabled transportation service (OETS) in Indonesia, the Philippines and Taiwan?

Design/methodology/approach

This study is qualitative-comparative research. Data on the transportation sector of each country have been gathered from reputable online sources.

Findings

Authors found evidence that the policy responses made by the Governments of Indonesia, Philippines and Taiwan to the sharing economy in the transportation sector are incremental and trial-error based policies.

Research limitations

This paper has not addressed the policy issues’ relationship between driver and platform companies.

Practical implications

The future of the relationship between sharing firms and local governments suggests that the focus should be on stronger consumer protections, deeper economic redistribution and achievement of other policy aims (Rauch and Schleicher, 2015).

Originality/value

This is a comparative study on different levels of economy, particularly between low- or middle-income and high-income country.

Details

Digital Policy, Regulation and Governance, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5038

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Book part
Publication date: 28 September 2016

Roger F. Teal

To assess how advances in technology are changing the market prospects for paratransit, particularly DRT services.

Abstract

Purpose

To assess how advances in technology are changing the market prospects for paratransit, particularly DRT services.

Design/methodology/approach

To review recent developments in technology-enabled paratransit service through their impact on the supply curve for local transportation.

Findings

Some technology-enabled paratransit services, notably one-way car sharing and shared ride services offered by transportation network companies (TNCs), have been successful in generating significant usage within the past 24 months in Europe as well as the United States. At the same time, the introduction of technological advances in a comprehensive technology platform used for general public DRT services in Denver has not resulted in a ridership response of a large magnitude. Similarly, technology-enabled micro-transit services have had difficulty attracting sustainable levels of ridership. This suggests only some packages of technological innovations are able to shift the transportation supply curve. The key appears to be the development of a comprehensive technology platform which makes the new service simple and convenient to engage, use, and pay for; it is also highly advantageous if the service is less costly to the end user than existing alternatives.

Research limitations/implications

Technology-enabled improvements of paratransit/DRT services are feasible and increasingly available, but the evidence shows that only when the use of technology significantly shifts the supply curve for local transportation that major impacts occur.

Originality/value

To provide concrete evidence as to the circumstances in which technology can make a significant impact on paratransit’s market prospects, but also identifies some of the limits to technology being able to create such impacts.

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Article
Publication date: 15 December 2020

Abdul Waheed Siyal, Hongzhuan Chen, Gang Chen, Muhammad Mujahid Memon and Zainab Binte

Mobile taxi booking apps (MTB) have revolutionalized the transportation industry. As taxis can be hired via smartphones, irrespective of any time or place, the business…

Abstract

Purpose

Mobile taxi booking apps (MTB) have revolutionalized the transportation industry. As taxis can be hired via smartphones, irrespective of any time or place, the business platform for taxi service has completely changed. Now customers are saved from the hassle of going to the designated taxi stands or waiting along the roadside. But, the long-term sustainability of this service depends on its continued use. Therefore, this study aims to explore factors that hedonically incline people toward continuance of MTB. To achieve the purpose, the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) was extended with mediation effects of hedonic motivation.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from existing users of MTB and analyzed through structural equation modeling and revalidated via artificial neural networks.

Findings

The statistical results show that the main factors of UTAUT substantially create hedonic motivation to use the apps and significantly mediate their effects on behavioral intention to continue using MTB. However, mediation between social influence and continuity intent was not statistically supported. The findings represent important contributions to the extended UTAUT.

Practical implications

This study adds value to the theoretical horizon and also presents M-taxi companies with useful and pertinent plans for efficient designing and effective implementation of MTB. Moreover, limitations and suggestions for future researchers are also discussed.

Originality/value

This study extends UTAUT with the mediating role of hedonic motivation to predict continued use of MTB, which further initiates the applicability of UTAUT in a new setting and a new perspective (post adoption). This, in turn, significantly expands theory by using hedonic motivation as an important attribute that could mediate impact of all main antecedents to shape customers loyalty toward system use.

Details

Data Technologies and Applications, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9288

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Lars Huemer

The study has two related objectives. At the firm level of analysis, the author proposes that a clearer distinction between firms’ mediating functions and mediators could…

Abstract

Purpose

The study has two related objectives. At the firm level of analysis, the author proposes that a clearer distinction between firms’ mediating functions and mediators could enhance the understanding of business network strategizing. Whereas firms’ mediating functions have received attention in IMP research, less focus has been given to organizations whose core business is mediation. At the system level of analysis, the study complements the perception of a network horizon with that of a network verizon. Whereas the horizon is closely associated with work on firms’ mediating functions, the network verizon is of particular interest to mediators. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual study combines IMP insights with strategic management theory.

Findings

The notion of a network horizon is important for business network strategizing, but also influences the perception of relevant network structures. These structures tend to be characterized by sequential interdependencies and a long-linked technology, often associated with physical products and production facilities. The notion of a network verizon highlights a network “depth” that has been unnoticed by previous work, which has focused on how narrow or wide a firm’s network horizon should be. The network horizon and the network verizon add strategizing options in terms of connecting key actors in the network to create additional value.

Originality/value

This paper concerns how IMP scholars understand boundaries and firms, and how perceptions of these influence business network strategizing. The study articulates a distinction between firms’ mediating functions and those organizations that fundamentally create value through mediating services. This distinction has system-level implications. In particular, the claim that the basis for a firm’s strategizing is its network horizon is discussed. The author proposes the notion of a “network Verizon,” providing a boundary perception of specific relevance to mediators. The network verizon portrays a network depth beyond both sequential tiers in a supply chain and links between different supply chains.

Details

IMP Journal, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-1403

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Case study
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Feng Tianjun, Zhang Chunyi and Quan Lin

Shanghai ANE Logistics Co., Ltd., established on June 1, 2010, is a business of road part-load logistics for goods from 5 to 300 kilograms. Mr. Wang Yongjun and his…

Abstract

Shanghai ANE Logistics Co., Ltd., established on June 1, 2010, is a business of road part-load logistics for goods from 5 to 300 kilograms. Mr. Wang Yongjun and his management team have spent five consecutive years building ANE into the biggest part-load franchising network in China, and set up a brand new business model, through integration of traditional transport lines, part-load express network and information technology platform.

Details

Management School, Fudan University, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2632-7635
Published by: Management School, Fudan University

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Book part
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Minsun Ji

This chapter examines the labor-empowerment potential of emerging taxi driver cooperative-union partnerships. Cooperative-union partnerships can adopt differing stances…

Abstract

This chapter examines the labor-empowerment potential of emerging taxi driver cooperative-union partnerships. Cooperative-union partnerships can adopt differing stances toward the virtue of waging broad-based, class-conscious conflict against economic elites to win economic change, as opposed to the virtue of small-scale and practical steps to improve the immediate conditions of individual “job-conscious” workers. This case study utilizes a “class consciousness” versus “job consciousness” framework to examine a recent immigrant taxi driver union-cooperative partnership.

Case study of taxi driver organizing in Denver (CO), utilizing narrative inquiry, and survey and interviews with 69 drivers.

The US tradition of accommodational job consciousness continues to influence union and cooperative leaders. Among Denver’s taxi cooperatives, an emphasis on accommodational job consciousness, bereft of class perspectives, has undermined a narrative promoting worker solidarity or encouraging workers to engage in social justice campaigns for immigrant workers. The consequence has been to weaken the transformational potential of taxi driver activism.

Findings based on a single case study need to be confirmed through additional research.

Cooperative-union partnerships that adopt a class-conscious political approach, including leadership development opportunities, a “labor empowerment curriculum, and partnerships with broader social movements, are a promising alternative to narrowly tailored “job conscious” organizing strategies.

Immigrants are increasingly forming worker cooperatives, and the recent Denver taxi driver union-cooperative is one of the largest taxi cooperatives in the country. Current research on the labor empowerment consequences of these emerging immigrant cooperatives is sparse.

Details

Employee Ownership and Employee Involvement at Work: Case Studies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-520-7

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Florence M. Chee

This paper aims to engage with the social issues emerging from the increasing reliance upon app-driven services, as they pertain to precarious labor and ethical…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to engage with the social issues emerging from the increasing reliance upon app-driven services, as they pertain to precarious labor and ethical standpoints in a digital era. Popular ride services such as Uber have been lauded for bringing much needed transportation services that are superior to expensive taxis or unpleasant or inaccessible public transit.

Design/methodology/approach

As a result of over three years of ongoing research and analysis, this paper is a comprehensive assessment of a number of social issues facing the integration of practices both signified and enacted in an economy driven by apps such as Uber. While these companies are indeed profitable, questions remain as to just how much of a panacea these practices actually herald.

Findings

Findings indicate that privatization and a lack of labor regulation may present a significant savings to the user, but full cost economics suggest that the social and environmental costs require consideration.

Research limitations/implications

The recommendations here refer to the ethical considerations forwarded in this paper and serve to open up dialog to further discuss the persistent issues facing a precarious future.

Practical implications

In terms of practical implications, there is a point of tension between governmental/regulatory bodies, disruptive innovators and users.

Social implications

Stakeholders of all stripes are scrambling to keep up with the pace and problematics of digital innovations and an inclusive critical dialog on app-driven services has yet to become a priority.

Originality/value

The original value of this analytical framework from a social justice perspective stands to catalyze action on a number of pervasive social issues surrounding digital ethics and policy.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

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Book part
Publication date: 28 September 2016

Abstract

Details

Paratransit: Shaping the Flexible Transport Future
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-225-5

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2020

Mohammad Nabil Almunawar, Muhammad Anshari and Syamimi Ariff Lim

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the enabling factors and the customers’ acceptance of ride-hailing in Indonesia.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the enabling factors and the customers’ acceptance of ride-hailing in Indonesia.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopt some constructs from the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) 2 as the framework for the study to derive factors that influence the acceptance of ride-hailing in Indonesia. Samples through a convenience sampling method were collected from an online survey and were transformed into data through coding and subsequently processed using SPSS for descriptive analysis, reliability test, correlation and multiple regression analysis for hypothesis testing.

Findings

Ride-hailing started in 2015 in Indonesia. Five enabling factors make digital ride-hailing possible, the internet, smartphone, broadband wireless network, digital map and global positioning system. The authors found that performance expectancy, social influence and habit positively influence customers to accept ride-hailing in Indonesia.

Research limitations/implications

Although this research has a small sample, it is still relevant to understand people’s acceptance to the ride-hailing platform. As a ride-hailing platform is now transformed to a multisided markets platform, adoption studies or other studies on each market to cover the whole picture of the platform influence to the society, and its contribution to the national economy will be very interesting. The authors’ future research will cover various services covered by ride-hailing companies.

Originality/value

This study proposes and argues that four main enabling factors make digital ride-hailing a viable business. The study contributes to three significant factors that influence the acceptance of ride-hailing in Indonesia.

Details

Journal of Science and Technology Policy Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4620

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