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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2011

V K Kothari, S Dhamija and R K Varshney

Mechanical properties of 100% polyester and polyester-viscose (P/V) blended yarns produced from polyester fibres which vary in denier and cross-sectional shape have been…

Abstract

Mechanical properties of 100% polyester and polyester-viscose (P/V) blended yarns produced from polyester fibres which vary in denier and cross-sectional shape have been analyzed. It is observed that fibre fineness and cross-sectional shape play a significant role in the translation of fibre properties to the respective yarn properties. As the fibre linear density decreases, fibre strength translation efficiency increases. In the case of trilobal fibre, translation efficiency is observed to be lower, but yarn breaking elongation is higher in comparison to the corresponding circular fibre. Scalloped oval fibre contributes more towards yarn strength and elongation versus the equivalent circular and tetraskelion fibres. In the P/V blended form, a decrease in yarn tenacity does not affect fibre fineness, but is substantially influenced by changes in the fibre profile. Contribution of broken viscose fibres (comparatively weaker component) at the point of actual breaking of yarn, i.e. Z-value, is altered depending on the polyester fibre profile, which is higher in trilobal and scalloped oval fibres in comparison to the corresponding circular ones, but the role of fibre linear density in this regard is rendered insignificant.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

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Article
Publication date: 20 August 2018

Christian Olalla-Soler

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the use of electronic information resources to solve cultural translation problems at different stages of acquisition of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the use of electronic information resources to solve cultural translation problems at different stages of acquisition of the translator’s cultural competence.

Design/methodology/approach

A process and product-oriented, cross-sectional, quasi-experimental study was conducted with 38 students with German as a second foreign language from the four years of the Bachelor’s degree in Translation and Interpreting at Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, and ten professional translators.

Findings

Translation students use a wider variety of resources, perform more queries and spend more time on queries than translators when solving cultural translation problems. The students’ information-seeking process is generally less efficient than that of the translators. Training has little impact on the students’ use of electronic information resources for this specific purpose, since all students use them similarly regardless of the year they are in.

Research limitations/implications

The study has been conducted with a small sample and only one language pair from a single pedagogical context. The tendencies observed cannot be generalised to the whole population of translation students.

Practical implications

This paper has implications for translator training, as it encourages the development of efficient information-seeking processes for the resolution of cultural translation problems.

Originality/value

Unlike other studies, this paper focusses on a specific translation problem type. It provides information related to the students’ information-seeking strategies for the resolution of cultural translation problems, which can be useful for translation training.

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2019

Rubén Martínez-Alonso, María J. Martínez-Romero and Alfonso A. Rojo-Ramírez

The purpose of this paper is to offer new insights regarding an issue that has attracted the interest of multitude academics and practitioners in business management and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer new insights regarding an issue that has attracted the interest of multitude academics and practitioners in business management and family firm literature: technological innovation (TI). Specifically, this study brings new knowledge regarding both the impact of TI efficiency on firm growth and the moderating role of family involvement in management on such relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a matched-pairs design and an ordinary least squares regression analysis to examine a sample of 152 Spanish manufacturing firms.

Findings

First, the authors show that firms obtaining higher TI efficiency are also those that achieve superior growth. Second, the authors reveal that as family involvement in management increases, the positive effect that TI efficiency exerts on firm growth is strengthened.

Practical implications

This study suggests that family managers should essentially consider various aspects such as tacit knowledge, social capital and long-standing collaborations with stakeholders to reinforce the relationship between TI efficiency and firm growth.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study that analyses the effect of TI efficiency on firm growth, as well as, when and to what extent family involvement in management influences the TI efficiency–growth relationship. Thus, this paper provides a deeper understanding of the importance that family managers could have on firm growth deriving from TI efficiency.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1999

Paul A. Watters and Malti Patel

The Internet has the potential to facilitate understanding across cultures and languages by removing the physical barriers to intercultural communication. One possible…

Abstract

The Internet has the potential to facilitate understanding across cultures and languages by removing the physical barriers to intercultural communication. One possible contributor to this development has been the recent release of freely‐available automated direct machine translation systems, such as AltaVista with SYSTRAN, which translates from English to five other European languages (French, German, Italian, Spanish and Portuguese), and vice versa. However, concerns have recently been raised over the performance of these systems, and the potential for confusion that can be created when the intended meaning of sentences is not correctly translated (i.e. semantic processing errors). In this paper, we use an iterative paradigm to examine errors associated with interlingual divergence in meaning arising from the automated machine translation of English proverbs. The need for the development of Web‐based translation systems, which have an explicit cross‐linguistic representation of meaning for successful intercultural communication, is discussed.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 May 2021

Zakaryia Almahasees and Mutahar Qassem

The spread of Covid-19 has led to the closure of educational institutions worldwide, forcing academic institutions to find online platforms. The purpose of this paper is…

Abstract

Purpose

The spread of Covid-19 has led to the closure of educational institutions worldwide, forcing academic institutions to find online platforms. The purpose of this paper is to accelerate the development of the online learning (OL) environments within those institutions. The Covid-19 pandemic has unfolded the extent of the academic institutions' readiness to deal with such a crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

In this vein, the study aimed to identify the perception of translation instructors in teaching translation courses online during Covid-19, using a questionnaire to explore the strategies and challenges of teaching and assessing students' performance. The analysis revealed instructors' reliance on Zoom and Microsoft Teams in offering virtual classes and WhatsApp in communication with students outside the class.

Findings

The findings revealed the relative effectiveness of online education, but its efficacy is less than face-to-face learning according to the respondents' views. It was also found that students faced difficulties in OL, which lie in adapting to the online environment, lack of interaction and motivation and the deficiency of data connections. Even though online education could work as an aid during Covid-19, but it could not replace face-to-face instruction. Based on the findings, the study recommended blended learning. Combining online education with face-to-face instruction, i.e. face-to-face plus synchronous and asynchronous, would result in a rigorous OL environment.

Originality/value

The research is genuine and there is no conflict of interest.

Details

PSU Research Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2399-1747

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2011

Monique Aubry

Today's organisations still face the duality of organising for both innovation and projects through organic structures while at the same time maintaining stability within…

Abstract

Purpose

Today's organisations still face the duality of organising for both innovation and projects through organic structures while at the same time maintaining stability within their hierarchical structures. Issues, tensions and conflicts arise at the interfaces between these two/competing modes of organising. The purpose of this paper is to explore what really happens at the interfaces between the structures and governance modes that result from the prevalence of project‐oriented organisations. The theoretical framework is based upon the actor‐network theory (ANT) in order to capture networks construction around project management offices (PMO) deliverables that cross multiple organisational boundaries.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is of explorative nature. Even though the number of cases is limited to two, a strong research design was obtained through maximizing together their homogeneity and heterogeneity. Data were primarily collected from semi‐directed interviews with 29 individuals. Data analysis were done within a grounded theory approach. This study focus on one particular PMO deliverable: the project status report. The itinerary of the project status report was followed within each organisation.

Findings

What this study shows is the complexity of the translation process followed by a project status report. It highlighted specifically the existence of multiple arenas for negotiation. Interfaces can then be seen as translation centers where multiple perspectives on the project are discussed. Issues, tensions and conflicts are to be resolved when converging towards an irreversible unique point of control. Translations are not free. They incurred significant transaction costs which are invisible to the management team.

Research limitations/implications

While many other perspectives would permit a better understanding of what happens at the interface between hierarchy and projects, this research focused on networks constructlon within the ANT framework. This research is exploratory and as such there are certain inherent limitations. First, it was limited to two case studies only. Second, only one deliverable was scrutinised through ANT. Further research should also be undertaken to link project monitoring and control functions to project governance.

Practical implications

Practical implications relate to the capability of anticipating the consequences of organising within dual structures. This research leads to three major conclusions: PMO is part of the power system and politics; there are costs to hyper‐control; and interfaces could be seen as learning opportunities.

Originality/value

This originality of this paper is twofold: the research subject and the theoretical framework. First, the research subject looked at politics and power systems within the organisational project management. While previous researches have identified issues, tensions and conflicts surrounding the management of multiple projects, none has clearly focused on this subject. Second, this research adopted asocial approach based on an ANT framework. This approach focuses on the networks construction where issues, tensions and conflicts can be observed while they unfold.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Book part
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Haldor Byrkjeflot

It is doubtful whether Max Weber would have been appreciative of his current status as the father of organisation theory. Weber did not develop the concept of bureaucracy…

Abstract

It is doubtful whether Max Weber would have been appreciative of his current status as the father of organisation theory. Weber did not develop the concept of bureaucracy as part of a quest to advance a science of organisations, or in order to do a microanalysis of the internal structure of particular organisational units. The concept of bureaucracy was an ideal-typical concept developed as a point of departure for comparisons across historical periods and geographic settings. Weber’s research was motivated by macroscopic and historical questions such as ‘why did capitalism develop in the West’ and, ‘how do persons in the West and other civilizations attach meaning to their activities?’ Unlike consultants and organisation theorists that make use of him today, it was not a major concern for Weber to develop criteria for the most efficient kinds of organisations. Rather, his concern was to identify variations in administrative and bureaucratic cultures and patterns by the means of the bureaucratic ideal type. It is maintained in modern textbooks in organisation theory that there has been a development from a closed and rationalistic paradigm towards an understanding of organisations as open and natural systems, and Max Weber’s theory of bureaucracy is taken as a point of departure for this kind of narrative. This classification of Weber as an example of a rational and closed approach is highly questionable. The cross-societal and historical approach used so effectively by Weber, is put on a sidetrack in such mainstream narratives. It would be more in the spirit of Weber to focus on organising as an activity, bureaucracy as an ethos and to study organisations within their particular political and cultural contexts.

Details

Bureaucracy and Society in Transition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-283-3

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2010

Virendra Ajodhia

Energy regulators applying price‐cap systems typically do not incorporate quality into the benchmarking process. The paper aims to develop a methodology for integrated…

Abstract

Purpose

Energy regulators applying price‐cap systems typically do not incorporate quality into the benchmarking process. The paper aims to develop a methodology for integrated cost‐quality benchmarking for electricity distribution networks.

Design/methodology/approach

Two basic models are developed namely a technical model which specifies quality as a minimising input factor, and a social cost model which measures the extent to which the provided quality level is optimal. The two models are applied to a sample of Dutch and UK firms.

Findings

The results suggest that integrated price‐quality benchmarking is an important regulatory asset but at the same time, its limitations should also be recognised.

Originality/value

Traditionally, benchmarking under price‐caps has been mostly restricted to the analysis in the area of costs. A truly integrated price‐quality benchmarking approach for electricity distribution networks is, however, lacking. This paper aims to fill this gap.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 26 October 2017

Sudhanshu Joshi, Manu Sharma and Shalu Rathi

The chapter examines a comprehensive review of cross-disciplinary literature in the domain of supply chain forecasting during research period 1991–2017, with the primary…

Abstract

The chapter examines a comprehensive review of cross-disciplinary literature in the domain of supply chain forecasting during research period 1991–2017, with the primary aim of exploring the growth of literature from operational to demand centric forecasting and decision making in service supply chain systems. A noted list of 15,000 articles from journals and search results are used from academic databases (viz. Science Direct, Web of Sciences). Out of various content analysis techniques (Seuring & Gold, 2012), latent sementic analysis (LSA) is used as a content analysis tool (Wei, Yang, & Lin, 2008; Kundu et al., 2015). The reason for adoption of LSA over existing bibliometric techniques is to use the combination of text analysis and mining method to formulate latent factors. LSA creates the scientific grounding to understand the trends. Using LSA, Understanding future research trends will assist researchers in the area of service supply chain forecasting. The study will be beneficial for practitioners of the strategic and operational aspects of service supply chain decision making. The chapter incorporates four sections. The first section describes the introduction to service supply chain management and research development in this domain. The second section describes usage of LSA for current study. The third section describes the finding and results. The fourth and final sections conclude the chapter with a brief discussion on research findings, its limitations, and the implications for future research. The outcomes of analysis presented in this chapter also provide opportunities for researchers/professionals to position their future service supply chain research and/or implementation strategies.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1967

The Standard Book Numbering Scheme will come into operation this summer (1967). The Agency is jointly supported by J. Whitaker & Sons Ltd, the Council of the British…

Abstract

The Standard Book Numbering Scheme will come into operation this summer (1967). The Agency is jointly supported by J. Whitaker & Sons Ltd, the Council of the British National Bibliography Ltd, and the Publishers' Association. The scheme involves the adoption by the UK book trade of a standard system of numbering book titles, suitable for computer manipulation of data processing equipment into many publishing operations. Using this type of equipment, a standard number can now easily be incorporated. By a standard number for a book title is meant a unique number which is used by all concerned with order processing operations involving that title. The number is then an identifying code for that title throughout its existence. BNB will adopt the number as their accession number, which can then be used for such purposes as catalogue card ordering and computer‐based interlibrary lending procedures. Blocks of numbers have already been allocated to about 1,600 active publishers. Full details of the mechanics of book numbering are given. The target date for the allocation and publication of standard book numbers for all new British books is October 1967. The Publishers Association have also issued a report by Professor F. G. Foster, who carried out the inquiry into the feasibility of such a scheme. It is hoped that there may be an international extension of the scheme, which would particularly benefit publishers operating in more than one country.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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