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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2022

Noa Nelson, Raphaele Fuchs and Mayan Kurtz-Cohen

Work–family conflict (WFC) is a chronic source of stress, threatening contemporary organizations. Employees' own characteristics, which have received limited scientific…

Abstract

Purpose

Work–family conflict (WFC) is a chronic source of stress, threatening contemporary organizations. Employees' own characteristics, which have received limited scientific attention, can help mitigate WFC. The current two studies tested, for the first time, the links of higher-order trait resilience models to WFC, while exploring possible mediators and differentiating the contributions of interpersonal vs. intrapersonal resilient traits.

Design/methodology/approach

In study 1, the authors tested a mediation model in which trait negotiation resilience (TNR), which is oriented toward challenges that involve balancing conflicting needs with others, predicted multidimensional (time, strain and behavior based) WFC, through three mediators: emotion regulation (intrapersonal), self-monitoring and work–family balance negotiation (both interpersonally oriented). In study 2, both TNR and the more intrapersonal Connor–Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC) were associated with a global, more parsimonious measurement of WFC. Additionally, TNR's factors were separately correlated with the latter.

Findings

TNR associated with lower multidimensional WFC through emotion regulation, which partly mediated TNR's effect; and through self-monitoring, which suppressed TNR's effect because it related to higher WFC (balance negotiation had no effect). In study 2, CD-RISC, but not TNR, related to lower global WFC. Additionally, two intrapersonal TNR factors tended to relate to lower WFC, while one interpersonal factor related to higher WFC.

Originality/value

The studies demonstrate the role of higher-order trait resilience in WFC, while fine-tuning understanding of the contributions of intrapersonal vs. interpersonal resilience. The findings may be relevant to other organizational challenges, beyond WFC, and inform employee recruitment and training.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 25 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2020

Rotem Shacham, Noa Nelson and Rachel Ben-Ari

This study aims to test the contributions of a new type of resilience, Trait Negotiation Resilience (TNR; Nelson et al., 2016), to negotiators’ effective behavior…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to test the contributions of a new type of resilience, Trait Negotiation Resilience (TNR; Nelson et al., 2016), to negotiators’ effective behavior, perception of opponent and negotiation outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

A laboratory study (N = 98; 49 dyads) featuring a mixed-motive negotiation task. Participants self-reported TNR (emotional skills, social sensitivity, intrinsic motivation for self-improvement and a sense of purpose to life events) up to a week before negotiating. After the negotiations, they rated their opponents on resilient, effective personal attributes and reported their own subjective value (SV). Trained judges watched the negotiations, coded objective outcomes and rated negotiators on dimensions of effective negotiation behavior. Statistical analyses accounted for dyadic interdependence.

Findings

TNR predicted higher levels of effective negotiation behavior, which, in turn, fully mediated TNR’s favorable contribution to negotiated value. TNR also predicted higher levels of SV, and this contribution was partially mediated by perceiving effective personal attributes in the opponent.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size was moderate and it consisted of undergraduate students, most of them female.

Originality/value

Evidence on the contribution of a personality construct to both outcome and process negotiator variables; contribution to the research of specific types of resilience.

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