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Book part
Publication date: 8 August 2017

Terri Summey

To explore the feasibility of utilizing the Bar-On mixed model of emotional–social intelligence as a framework for the competencies and traits needed for reference and…

Abstract

To explore the feasibility of utilizing the Bar-On mixed model of emotional–social intelligence as a framework for the competencies and traits needed for reference and information services librarians. Through a survey of the literature, the author created a baseline list of competencies, which was compared and contrasted with the abilities, traits, and competencies that comprise the Bar-On model of emotional–social intelligence. The author conducted a pilot study with a small group (n = 10) of reference and user services librarians who took the EQ-i 2.0. The competencies and traits of reference and user services librarians identified in the literature compare favorably with those measured by the EQ-i 2.0. Overall, a majority of the participants (70%) obtained a total score on the EQ-i 2.0 in the mid or high range. Composite scales with the highest overall mean scores were decision-making and self-perception. Subscales with the highest scores included the following: impulse control, self-actualization, social responsibility, problem solving, and reality testing. As a pilot study, it was conducted using a small population of academic reference and user services librarians. Further research should be conducted utilizing a larger population of reference and user services librarians or librarians who have been recognized as exemplary in reference librarianship. The findings of this study could assist pre-service and in-service reference and user services librarians in further developing their emotional–social intelligence competencies and abilities by identifying areas where improvements could occur.

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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2021

Kannu Priya Kamboj and Pooja Garg

The substance of the present study lies in analysing the extent to which intrinsic factors like emotional intelligence and resilient character traits impact the…

Abstract

Purpose

The substance of the present study lies in analysing the extent to which intrinsic factors like emotional intelligence and resilient character traits impact the psychological well-being of school teachers. It prominences the mediating role of resilient character traits in the relationship between emotional intelligence and psychological well-being of teachers.

Design/methodology/approach

This cross-sectional survey study recruits a sample of 200 school teachers across the state of Haryana, India, with the help of a convenience sampling technique.

Findings

The findings from parallel multiple mediation indicate perseverance as a significant mediator and predictor of psychological well-being among factors of resilient traits, and self-reliance emerges as an inconsistent, yet significant mediator in the relationship between emotional intelligence and well-being of teachers. The direct effect of emotional intelligence on psychological well-being also emerged as statistically significant. Additionally, the female school teachers show higher emotional intelligence and resilience as compared to the male school teachers.

Practical implications

The research is not an unmitigated work in the exploration of a causal relationship between the study variables. However, the study draws practical suggestions for improving the perseverant and emotionally intelligent behaviour of teachers for better emotional and psychological adjustment at work. It acknowledges the role of school administration and education policymakers in furthering the betterment of teachers' psychological state for improved performance and effectiveness. Also, teamwork, stress reduction and leadership building appeared to be helpful contributors to enhance the perseverance and emotional intelligence among teachers.

Originality/value

Studies in the field of school administration rarely address the psychological well-being of school teachers as their concern. This study accentuates the impact of intrinsic antecedents of psychological well-being, which is neither well conceptualised in Indian studies nor is causally related to any psychological constructs. Therefore, it remarkably contributes to the literature in the field of educational management and leadership, providing an insight into the psyche of teachers from “the Orient”.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 28 April 2010

Pamela Qualter, Jane Ireland and Kathryn Gardner

Some studies assess impairments in emotional functioning of offenders using measures of emotional intelligence (EI). Such measures were developed for use in general…

Abstract

Some studies assess impairments in emotional functioning of offenders using measures of emotional intelligence (EI). Such measures were developed for use in general populations, and may not be suitable for offender samples. This study explores the factor structure of a commonly used trait EI measure for a sample of adult male offenders, and comments on its usefulness as a measure of emotional functioning for this group. We find that, although the SSREI can be indicated to be multi‐dimensional, the exact nature of its factors remains unclear for forensic samples. We conclude by suggesting that the social contexts and encounters that provoke emotion may be different for offenders and non‐offenders, and that there is a need to develop a trait EI measure specific to forensic populations.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 19 January 2015

Angeli Santos, Michael J. Mustafa and Terk Chern Gwi

This study aims to examine the concepts of trait emotional intelligence (EI), emotional labour strategies and burnout among internal human resources (HR) service…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the concepts of trait emotional intelligence (EI), emotional labour strategies and burnout among internal human resources (HR) service providers. It proposes a model to deepen our understanding of the processes explaining the protective effects of trait EI on employee burnout.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study comprises a sample of 143 HR professionals from a large Malaysian financial institution.

Findings

Results suggest that trait EI predicted personal- and work-related burnout but not client-related burnout. Trait EI was also found to be partly related to emotional labour (EL), exhibiting a negative relationship with surface acting but not with deep acting. While surface acting exhibited a significant relationship on all three forms of burnout, deep acting was only significantly related to client burnout. Moreover, mediation analyses revealed that surface acting partly mediated the relationship between EI and burnout.

Originality/value

This study examines the relationship between EI, EL and burnout in HR professionals. This study is the first in the literature to examine these relationships in the context of internal service providers and in a non-Western context. Our study enhances our understanding of the processes explaining the protective effects of trait EI on employee burnout in a non-Western context.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Anar Algozhina, Raikhan Sabirova, Roza Alimbayeva, Gulzada Kapbasova and Ayan Sarmantayev

The emotional intelligence (EI) model is widely used in pedagogy, management and other spheres as a useful concept with great potential for application. At the same time…

Abstract

Purpose

The emotional intelligence (EI) model is widely used in pedagogy, management and other spheres as a useful concept with great potential for application. At the same time, there are significant differences in the traits of EI in different social groups, in particular, in different countries, which are just beginning to be studied. To date, there is a significant gap in the research literature on cross-cultural research in the field of EI, especially in the area of measuring its performance. This work is devoted to the study of the quantitative aspects of the differences in the traits of EI between teachers of higher educational institutions in Kazakhstan and Russia.

Design/methodology/approach

For the study, 700 participants from two countries were involved, 350 people from each with an approximately equal distribution by gender and age. Mann–Whitney U test and Fisher transformation were used for statistical analysis of the results of the N. Hall test for teachers from two countries.

Findings

As a result of assessing the level of EI by the method of N. Hall, significant differences were found in the manifestation of various scales of EI in representatives of these two groups (Fisher's transformation relative to the scales: “emotional awareness” was f*em = 5.466).

Originality/value

The practical value of the study lies in the discovery of a methodology for determining the difference in the traits of EI, which can be used in the correction of teaching methods, personnel management in higher educational institutions and in the formation of educational teams.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Carolyn MacCann, Gerald Matthews, Moshe Zeidner and Richard D. Roberts

This article provides a review and conceptual comparison between self‐report and performance‐based measures of emotional intelligence. Analyses of reliability…

Abstract

This article provides a review and conceptual comparison between self‐report and performance‐based measures of emotional intelligence. Analyses of reliability, psychometric properties, and various forms of validity lead to the conclusion that self‐report techniques measure a dispositional construct, that may have some predictive validity, but which is highly correlated with personality and independent of intelligence. Although seemingly more valid, performance‐based measures have certain limitations, especially when scored with reference to consensual norms, which leads to problems of skew and restriction of range. Scaling procedures may partially ameliorate these scoring weaknesses. Alternative approaches to scoring, such as expert judgement, also suffer problems since the nature of the requisite expertise is unclear. Use of experimental paradigms for studying individual differences in information‐processing may, however, inform expertise. Other difficulties for performance‐based measures include limited predictive and operational validity, restricting practical utility in organizational settings. Further research appears necessary before tests of E1 are suitable for making real‐life decisions about individuals.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 25 September 2019

Isabel Quintillán and Iñaki Peña-Legazkue

The purpose of this paper is to identify the factors related to entrepreneurs’ emotional intelligence that trigger the choice of venture internationalization after locally…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the factors related to entrepreneurs’ emotional intelligence that trigger the choice of venture internationalization after locally suffering the shock of an economic recession in a developing economy.

Design/methodology/approach

The primary survey data were collected from 226 Uruguayan entrepreneurs and included their psychological traits and human capital characteristics after the most recent global financial crash of 2008. Personal interviews were conducted, and a “Trait Meta-Mood Scale” instrument (i.e. TMMS-12) was specifically designed for the measurement of emotional intelligence. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to test the hypotheses.

Findings

This study demonstrates that in disadvantaged environments, such as developing regions suffering from a severe global crisis, the early internationalization process of a new firm is mainly triggered by entrepreneurs’ emotional intelligence attributes rather than conventional human capital-related attributes. Moreover, social–emotional competences are more significant than personal–emotional competences to explain entrepreneurs’ exporting behaviour in such an adverse context.

Originality/value

The effect of emotional intelligence on venture internationalization is investigated in situations in which entrepreneurs are pressured to pursue risk-bearing strategies, pushed by a disrupting shock that weakens the national economic condition (e.g. an economic recession). While previous findings have highlighted the importance of entrepreneurs’ human capital attributes in their entering foreign markets, few studies have analysed how the emotional intelligence competences of entrepreneurs lead them to internationalize. This study fills this gap in the literature on entrepreneurial behaviour by focussing on the emotional, cognitive and psychological qualities of entrepreneurs to explain their exporting business decisions.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Ezgi Kırıcı Tekeli and Aziz Gökhan Özkoç

It is understood that the personality traits and intelligence levels of the tourist guides directly or indirectly affect their ability to solve the problems they encounter…

Abstract

Purpose

It is understood that the personality traits and intelligence levels of the tourist guides directly or indirectly affect their ability to solve the problems they encounter on tours. This study aims to test whether emotional intelligence has an intermediary effect on the problem-solving skills of professional tourist guides with perfectionist personality traits.

Design/methodology/approach

Field research was conducted within the study to analyze suggestions on the interaction of variables on an empirical basis, and data were collected using interview, document review and survey technique. Thus, the mixed-methods approach was used in the study. Within the scope of this study in which 410 professional tourist guides were surveyed, a substantial part of the research data was obtained through the application of the survey technique. Besides, interviews were carried out with 12 professional tourist guides. The clues obtained by the qualitative study were transformed into hypotheses within the scope of the quantitative study, and the intermediary effect was tested.

Findings

A relationship between the main themes, sub-themes and codes was determined within the framework of the qualitative method. As a result of the mediation test, it has been revealed that emotional intelligence has an intermediary role in the relationship between perfectionism and problem-solving skills. According to the results of bootstrapping, the indirect effect of emotional intelligence on perfectionism and problem-solving skills was found out to be significant.

Practical implications

The study acknowledged that positive perfectionism, high emotional intelligence and problem-solving skills contributed to the professional tourist guides being willing to provide better service. In tune with the assumption that the more the quality of the tours carried out through agencies increases, the more satisfied tourists are; the study implicated that it would be advisable for agencies to prioritize the trainings provided for their tour guides to enhance their positive perfectionist, emotionally intelligent personalities and problem-solving skills. Given that professional tourist guides may create a positive country image with the quality service they provide, the significance of such trainings stretch beyond the benefits of such organizations.

Originality/value

Relevant variables were analyzed with a mixed method and applied on professional tourist guides.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Laura Guillén Ramo, Willem E. Saris and Richard E. Boyatzis

The objective of this paper is to address the predictive validity of the behavioral approach of EI by Boyatzis and Goleman. There are two research questions guiding this…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this paper is to address the predictive validity of the behavioral approach of EI by Boyatzis and Goleman. There are two research questions guiding this study: emotional and social competencies are positively and significantly related with job performance; and emotional and social competencies will be more successful in predicting performance than universal personality dimensions, like the Big Five personality traits.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on the data of three medium‐sized Spanish organizations (n=223) that were involved in a competency management project based on emotional and social competencies. SPSS and structural modeling techniques available in the SEM program LISREL 8.51 software are used to enter the empirical analyses of the paper.

Findings

Results show that emotional competencies and personality traits are valuable predictors of job performance as measured by the nominations procedure in the study. In addition, competencies seem to be more powerful predictors of performance than global personality traits.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size is small.

Practical implications

The paper will provide reflective practitioners with useful conceptual and developmental handles for emotional competencies within organizations.

Originality/value

The paper helps to build a body of research that contributes to overcoming the paucity of evidence for the predictive validity of EI measures claimed by many authors.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 28 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Book part
Publication date: 15 February 2021

Fotis Kitsios, Ioannis Sitaridis and Maria Kamariotou

The purpose of this chapter is to conduct a structured literature review to examine the relationship between entrepreneurship and emotional intelligence in academic

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to conduct a structured literature review to examine the relationship between entrepreneurship and emotional intelligence in academic settings as well as the current entrepreneurship pedagogy for flexible, innovative and creative graduates. One hundred and twenty-eight peer-reviewed papers were analysed based on Webster’s and Watson’s (2002) methodology. Papers classified into three topics and a content analysis was implemented to discuss about the publication year, journals, authors, frequency of keywords and research method adopted. The contribution of this chapter is twofold. It is a bibliometric study which provides a macropicture of a research field, its evolution and connections among studies, in order to be a starting point for future researchers who are already studying entrepreneurial education or entrepreneurship-related scientific areas. Also, this chapter helps academics to improve educational programmes and curriculum to increase students’ entrepreneurial intention taking into account the factors that affect it.

Details

Universities and Entrepreneurship: Meeting the Educational and Social Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-074-8

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