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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2007

Anthony M. Grant

The purpose of this paper is to compare the impact of a long‐term (13‐week, spaced learning) with a short‐term (two‐day, block intensive) coaching skills training programme

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the impact of a long‐term (13‐week, spaced learning) with a short‐term (two‐day, block intensive) coaching skills training programme on participants' coaching skills and emotional intelligence.

Design/methodology/approach

In the study 23 participants completed a 13‐week coaching skills training course which consisted of weekly 2.5‐hour workshops and action learning. In comparison, 20 participants completed a two‐day “Manager as Coach” training programme, with a three‐week action learning break between day one and day two. Both training programmes used the same coaching frameworks, with the two‐day programme being more condensed.

Findings

Participation in the 13‐week training course was associated with increases in both goal‐focused coaching skills and emotional intelligence, whereas the two‐day block intensive training was associated with increased goal‐focused coaching skills, but not emotional intelligence. Further, the magnitude of the increase in goal‐focused coaching skills was less for the two‐day programme than for the 13‐week programme.

Research limitations/implications

These studies used a quasi‐experimental pre‐post design, and the long‐term effects were not measured. Future research should use control groups and random assignment to short‐ or long‐term training.

Practical implications

The main implications of these findings are that, while short, intensive programmes may improve participants' goal‐focused coaching skills, organisations seeking to deepen the impact of “Manager as Coach” training programmes and improve the underlying emotional intelligence of participants should use a spaced learning approach over a number of weeks.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine the impact of different approaches to coaching skills training and their impact on emotional intelligence.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 39 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2021

Carla Curado and Inês Sousa

The purpose of this study is to describe the evaluation of a training programme in a Portuguese family’s small and medium enterprise (SME) in the cosmetics industry. This…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to describe the evaluation of a training programme in a Portuguese family’s small and medium enterprise (SME) in the cosmetics industry. This study addresses the four levels of the Kirkpatrick Model and estimates the return on investment (ROI) of a training programme in sales.

Design/methodology/approach

The study follows a case design to address the analysis of the training outcomes. This study uses data from 53 employees and explore the programme’s results.

Findings

This study provides evidence on the reactions of the trainees to the programme; the learning which results from it; and on the changes in trainees’ behaviours and the consequent results. This study also estimates the ROI of the programme; it is 5.55.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations to this study may be the use of data from a single training programme.

Practical implications

The research results offer managers some critical information in terms of future options in resource allocation. Training managers become more informed in making future choices on where to invest in training programmes.

Originality/value

The originality of the study regards the ROI estimation for an SME’s sales training programme. SMEs are not often addressed in the training evaluation literature. Because SMEs have limited organisational resources, and they do not invest much in training. Further, this estimation requires data gathering and reporting that is not commonly done, even for large firms.

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Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 53 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

Ronald R. Sims

Several activities successfully used in trainer developmentprogrammes, designed to develop, set up, and use different excercises toenhance the “start‐up” phase of a…

Abstract

Several activities successfully used in trainer development programmes, designed to develop, set up, and use different excercises to enhance the “start‐up” phase of a training programme, are described. A key aspect of the activities discussed involves learning how to utilise one′s experiences and those of others effectively to build learning climates in training programmes.

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Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

M. Dolores Moreno Luzon

The importance of training in the implementation of a quality programme is well known. Training is needed to improve ability, to learn new techniques, and to stimulate…

Abstract

The importance of training in the implementation of a quality programme is well known. Training is needed to improve ability, to learn new techniques, and to stimulate involvement in the goals and objectives of the firm. Presents some of the results of a study made of a sample of 44 small firms in Valencia, on the Mediterranean coast of Spain. The research has shown what specific characteristics and obstacles training for quality has encountered in these firms. The narrow focus of the majority of these quality programmes was an obstacle to overcoming resistance to change and lack of interest, problems which were frequently encountered. The research also detected a relationship between participative management and the training of managers for quality.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1990

Alison J. Smith and John A. Piper

Management training and development is currently in vogue. Thereappears to be a growing belief in the benefits of investment in trainingand development. When a market is…

Abstract

Management training and development is currently in vogue. There appears to be a growing belief in the benefits of investment in training and development. When a market is buoyant is the time to consider and anticipate the consequences of a future downturn in demand. Such a downturn in demand may demonstrate increasing pressure to “justify” investment in training and development. There is a long established academic body of knowledge on the subject of evaluating training and development. From research evidence and the authors′ experience, the sponsors and the providers of training and development pay scant attention to systematic evaluation of these activities and investments. It is the authors′ contention that when the market′s critical assessment of the value of training and development increases there will be an increasing interest in evaluation. An overview of the history of evaluation traditions is provided and the state of play is commented upon. It is noted that there is a shortfall between theory and practice. It is argued that evaluation is a worthwhile and important activity and ways through the evaluation literature maze and the underpinnings of the activity are demonstrated, especially to management. Similarly the literature on evaluation techniques is reviewed. Tables are provided which demonstrate areas of major activity and identify relatively uncharted waters. This monograph provides a resource whereby practitioners can choose techniques which are appropriate to the activity on which they are engaged. It highlights the process which should be undertaken to make that choice in order that needs of the major stakeholders in the exercise are fully met.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 14 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

Joseph Murphy and Philip Hallinger

Eleven representative examples of professional development areexamined in what is labelled a new era of administrator training. Ananalysis is presented of the conditions…

Abstract

Eleven representative examples of professional development are examined in what is labelled a new era of administrator training. An analysis is presented of the conditions that have helped foster interest in the creation of new approaches to the training of school administrators. Ten current conditions in the area of administrator training where improvement is needed are reported on. Commonalities among the new approaches to training are discussed and these principles juxtaposed against the status quo in administrator training. It is concluded that the new era of professional development is significantly different from many current training programmes, in terms of both process and content. These differences are examined in detail. Potential problems in these newer approaches to administrator training are noted.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2010

Jurie van Vuuren and Melodi Botha

This paper sets out to apply practically the constructs of the entrepreneurial performance training model to three different training interventions, known as the business…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to apply practically the constructs of the entrepreneurial performance training model to three different training interventions, known as the business start‐up, basic entrepreneurship, and advanced entrepreneurship programmes. Furthermore, the paper aims to measure the business performance indicators and skills transfer that took place after the training interventions.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative research was conducted, using three validated research questionnaires. The research design consists of a pre‐test, post‐test and post‐post test (ten weeks after the training interventions took place). Factor analysis was done, descriptive statistics arising from opinions and expressions are presented and statistical tests such as the Chi‐square test and ANOVA provide inferential statistics.

Findings

The business performance indicators improved for all three training groups after they attended the training interventions. Furthermore, it was proved that skills transfer took place after the respondents attended the training interventions.

Research limitations/implications

The training groups can be measured again after 18 months of three years to really determine the impact of the training interventions. The results of the three training programmes can be compared to see whether the basic entrepreneurship groups gained more skills and their business performance indicators increased more than the business start‐up or advanced entrepreneurship programmes.

Practical implications

The outcomes and implications of this research paper emphasise that it is imperative to design training programmes based on training models that have been tested. This paper highlights some aspects of how constructs used within the training models can be tested.

Originality/value

The entrepreneurial performance‐training model was practically applied and provides a set of expectations for other entrepreneurship models as well as presenting a benchmark against which programme performance can be measured. A unique teaching methodology is portrayed that contributes to the overall effectiveness of the training model.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1981

Paul Bolino

Economists have known for some time that increases in the amounts of capital and labour cannot explain all of the growth of output (Kendrick, 1961, 1976). Schultz showed…

Abstract

Economists have known for some time that increases in the amounts of capital and labour cannot explain all of the growth of output (Kendrick, 1961, 1976). Schultz showed the potential importance of human resource development in explaining this residual when he made estimates of investments in education for the period 1900 to 1957. He stated that educational capital was clearly an important element in production and that it had risen at a much faster rate than reproducible non‐human wealth (Schultz, 1960, 1962).

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 8 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2021

Celestin Mayombe

The unemployment rate among disadvantaged youths (aged 15–34 years) in large parts of Africa, Asia and Latin America has become a global concern. The concern in this…

Abstract

Purpose

The unemployment rate among disadvantaged youths (aged 15–34 years) in large parts of Africa, Asia and Latin America has become a global concern. The concern in this article is that most WIL programmes could not facilitate a smooth WIL-to-work transition. The purpose of the article is to examine the roles of partner stakeholders in the features of an innovative WIL model influencing the labour market entry of the disadvantaged youths.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was suitable for examining the features of an innovative WIL model. Semi-structured interviews were used to collect data from seven managers of different firms and institutions, and ten trainees to examine the roles of partner stakeholders in the features of an innovative WIL model influencing the labour market entry of disadvantaged youths.

Findings

The main findings reveal that local businesses and enterprises played important roles in participating in the design of the WIL curriculum, providing adequate mentorship for work experience and micro-placement to the trainees. Based on the findings, the author concludes that the partnership with stakeholders as an innovative WIL model contributed to the employability of disadvantaged youths through the acquisition of work experience and work-readiness.

Practical implications

The implication of the findings is that the commitment of partner stakeholders ensures that WIL graduates continue to be employed. The commitment of partner stakeholders evident in this study is likely to continue creating better employment prospects for WIL graduates.

Originality/value

Though stakeholder partnerships are common in WIL programmes and TVET, the innovativeness of this model lies in the features of WIL programmes, the roles and commitment of stakeholders including the outcomes of the partnerships.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 19 May 2020

Gonçalo Bernardino and Carla Curado

This study aims to investigate the formative evaluations of the training programmes of a Portuguese national railway public company for an entire calendar year. The aim is…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the formative evaluations of the training programmes of a Portuguese national railway public company for an entire calendar year. The aim is to uncover alternative configurations for the design of training programmes to create better levels of evaluation. This study is based on the following research question: What are the configurations that lead to the success and or failure of trainers and trainees? Among those, are there any common designs that generate the success and or failure of both trainers and trainees?

Design/methodology/approach

This study used matched data from an entire calendar year to examine the trainers and trainees’ evaluations of 429 training events. This study also used a fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA) to provide configurations that generate the success or failure of trainers and trainees. This methodology offers alternative pathways to the same outcomes and thus gives managers different options to reach similar results.

Findings

The results show that there are more configurations that lead to trainers’ success (five) than to its absence (four). However, the configurations that lead to trainees’ success (three) are less than those that lead to its absence (six). The findings indicate that a single common configuration exists that leads to high evaluations.

Research limitations/implications

This study does not address summative evaluations. Regarding data, the study acknowledges the use of self-evaluations for trainees, although they serve as a proxy for a learning evaluation. The generalisation of the results outside the Portuguese railway company’s context is not possible.

Practical implications

The proposed analysis is applicable to other settings without restrictions. Managers may replicate this study’s approach in their organisations to uncover the alternative configurations that lead to the success or failure of trainers and trainees. They may adopt the ones that lead to successful outcomes and avoid the ones that lead to undesired ones.

Originality/value

This study is innovative because it addresses concurrently the success or failure of trainers and trainees that is only possible by using the fsQCA method. This study opted to use this method to provide alternative pathways to extreme outcomes: the most successful or the most unsuccessful. These multiple pathways are better results compared to traditional quantitative statistical methods that only provide a single estimated solution to the presence of the dependent variable; for example, a regression analysis or structural equation modelling.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 44 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

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