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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Marjorie Armstrong‐Stassen and Andrew Templer

The workforce is aging in all industrialized nations and the retention of older workers will become one of the dominant issues in the coming decades. Training is an…

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Abstract

Purpose

The workforce is aging in all industrialized nations and the retention of older workers will become one of the dominant issues in the coming decades. Training is an important component of retention and the availability of training is critical for retaining older workers.

Design/methodology/approach

Studies conducted in 2001 and 2003 assessed the extent to which Canadian organizations are adapting their training practices to respond to the aging workforce. Human resource executives were asked the extent to which their organization was currently engaging in training practices targeting older managerial and professional employees.

Findings

Organizations were most likely to be providing access to training and retraining, but fewer than 10 percent of the organizations in 2003 were highly engaged in doing this. Organizations were less likely to be adjusting training methods to accommodate the needs of older employees. There was little attempt to provide age awareness training to managers of older employees.

Practical implications

The challenge for organizations will be to close the gaps that currently exist between the practices that are important in retaining older managerial and professional employees and the extent to which organizations are engaging in these practices. Ensuring access to training, customizing training methods, and providing age awareness training require immediate attention.

Originality/value

Little research has been conducted on older workers in Canada. The findings raise some serious concerns about the response of Canadian organizations to the aging workforce and identify areas of training and development that need to be addressed.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 November 2019

Alba Manresa, Andrea Bikfalvi and Alexandra Simon

Over recent years, firms have been implementing novel human resource practices. The purpose of this paper is to analyse four specific training practices to determine if…

1567

Abstract

Purpose

Over recent years, firms have been implementing novel human resource practices. The purpose of this paper is to analyse four specific training practices to determine if and up to what extent the adoption of such practices affects innovation and financial performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A Spanish sub-sample of the European Manufacturing Survey is used to contain the responses of 162 manufacturing firms.

Findings

The positive relation between T&D practices and innovative performance was partially accepted, as new-to-the-firm products and new services had a significant relation with these practices. Conversely, the hypothesis stating that there is a positive relation between a new-to-the-market product and the aforementioned T&D practices was rejected. Furthermore, the positive relation between these and financial performance was partially accepted.

Research limitations/implications

This research presents the following limitation: the small number of responses restricts the general reliability of the findings. The inclusion of other countries’ data using the same questionnaire would further enrich the analysis.

Practical implications

First, general training and development is not enough; thus, the present study evidences the positive results of specific training practices such as training and development for creativity and innovation (TD4CI) on firm performances. Second, it also reveals a relation between training practices and innovation by differentiating among the three dimensions of innovation (new product to the firm, new product to the market and new services). Moreover, the present research highlights the benefits of implementing these types of practices, not only for innovation performance but also for financial performance. This paper also suggests that not all the training practices have the same impact on firm performance. Consequently, the company should be clear about their main aim to obtain the highest performance. The third contribution is based on the Spanish context wherein training is not considered as an important organisational function. Thus, this study provides positive results showing that TD4CI might enhance firm performance. Last, the degree of detail of the different training practices analysed, the recent nature of the data related to their implementation and the link between implementation and organisation performance are also part of the contribution of the present analyses.

Originality/value

This research offers recent and relevant data about implementing novel T&D practices and their relation with firm performance.

Article
Publication date: 13 November 2020

Craig Bennell, Brittany Blaskovits, Bryce Jenkins, Tori Semple, Ariane-Jade Khanizadeh, Andrew Steven Brown and Natalie Jennifer Jones

A narrative review of existing research literature was conducted to identify practices that are likely to improve the quality of de-escalation and use-of-force training

Abstract

Purpose

A narrative review of existing research literature was conducted to identify practices that are likely to improve the quality of de-escalation and use-of-force training for police officers.

Design/methodology/approach

Previous reviews of de-escalation and use-of-force training literature were examined to identify promising training practices, and more targeted literature searches of various databases were undertaken to learn more about the potential impact of each practice on a trainee's ability to learn, retain, and transfer their training. Semi-structured interviews with five subject matter experts were also conducted to assess the degree to which they believed the identified practices were relevant to de-escalation and use-of-force training, and would enhance the quality of such training.

Findings

Twenty practices emerged from the literature search. Each was deemed relevant and useful by the subject matter experts. These could be mapped on to four elements of training: (1) commitment to training (e.g. securing organizational support for training), (2) development of training (e.g. aligning training formats with learning objectives), (3) implementation of training (e.g. providing effective corrective feedback) and (4) evaluation and ongoing assessment of training (e.g. using multifaceted evaluation tools to monitor and modify training as necessary).

Originality/value

This review of training practices that may be relevant to de-escalation and use-of-force training is the broadest one conducted to date. The review should prompt more organized attempts to quantify the effectiveness of the training practices (e.g. through meta-analyses), and encourage more focused testing in a police training environment to determine their impact.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 44 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 September 2008

Thomas N. Garavan, John P. Wilson, Christine Cross, Ronan Carbery, Inga Sieben, Andries de Grip, Christer Strandberg, Claire Gubbins, Valerie Shanahan, Carole Hogan, Martin McCracken and Norma Heaton

Utilising data from 18 in‐depth case studies, this study seeks to explore training, development and human resource development (HRD) practices in European call centres. It…

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Abstract

Purpose

Utilising data from 18 in‐depth case studies, this study seeks to explore training, development and human resource development (HRD) practices in European call centres. It aims to argue that the complexity and diversity of training, development and HRD practices is best understood by studying the multilayered contexts within which call centres operate. Call centres operate as open systems and training, development and HRD practices are influenced by environmental, strategic, organisational and temporal conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilised a range of research methods, including in‐depth interviews with multiple stakeholders, documentary analysis and observation. The study was conducted over a two‐year period.

Findings

The results indicate that normative models of HRD are not particularly valuable and that training, development and HRD in call centres is emergent and highly complex.

Originality/value

This study represents one of the first studies to investigate training and development and HRD practices and systems in European call centres.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 32 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Valerie Thompson

With the aim of discovering the important factors in training staffto use newly installed automated circulation systems, the appropriatelibraries in New Zealand were sent…

Abstract

With the aim of discovering the important factors in training staff to use newly installed automated circulation systems, the appropriate libraries in New Zealand were sent a questionnaire in 1988. This asked how libraries had trained their staff, and the outcome of the training in terms of satisfaction with their decisions, sparseness of mistakes after implementation and time taken for staff to attain efficiency after implementation. The most important factors in training were that the vendor should be heavily involved in organizing and carrying out training; training should be given before the system went live; staff should be given detailed training in the whole system; and a number of different training methods should be used. These factors were especially important for libraries installing their first automated system, those installing integrated systems, those with few staff, and those installing their systems in the earlier years of automation; that is, those libraries whose staff have the least background in the system being installed, have the greatest need for excellent training.

Details

Library Management, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 June 2015

Carl J. Dunst and Deborah W. Hamby

The effectiveness of different types of adult learning practices for promoting practitioner and parent use of different kinds of assistive technology and adaptations with…

Abstract

The effectiveness of different types of adult learning practices for promoting practitioner and parent use of different kinds of assistive technology and adaptations with young children of 18–105 months of age was the focus of a research synthesis described in this chapter. Six operationally defined adult learning methods and between two and five practices for each method were used to code and analyze the results for both adult (practitioner and parent) and child outcomes. The assistive technology and adaptations that were the focus of training included speech generative devices (e.g., CheapTalk), computers (e.g., adapted keyboards), and switch-activated devices and toys. Results showed that a combination of five or six of the most effective adult learning method practices were associated with the largest differences in both adult and child outcomes, but that few studies included the most effective practices. The relationship between the number of practices and the study outcomes was moderated by the type of training (individual vs. group) and whether the training included in vivo use of the devices with children with disabilities. The results point to at least several factors that explain non-use of assistive technology with young children with disabilities and highlight the need for better designed and implemented training.

Article
Publication date: 7 April 2022

André Luís Castro Moura Duarte and Marcia Regina Santiago Santiago Scarpin

This study aims to identify the relationship between different maintenance practices and productive efficiency in continuous process productive plants as well as the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify the relationship between different maintenance practices and productive efficiency in continuous process productive plants as well as the moderating effect of good training practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical data were drawn from a database containing 609 observations of 29 productive units. Scales were validated using the Q-sort method. The panel data technique was used as the analysis methodology, with the inclusion of fixed effects for each productive plant.

Findings

Maintenance practices can effectively contribute to increasing the overall equipment effectiveness (OEE) of firms. Application of predictive maintenance practices should be considered as the primary training tool.

Research limitations/implications

This study used a secondary database, limiting the research design and data manipulation.

Practical implications

The article provides practitioners with an analysis of maintenance practices by category (predictive, preventive and corrective), and the impact of each practice on the OEE of continuous process productive plants. Moreover, it explores the importance of training for extracting more results from maintenance practices.

Social implications

Companies are investing in new technologies, but it is also essential to invest in training people. There is a demand for Industry 4.0 through the introduction of upskilling and reskilling programs.

Originality/value

This study used practice-based view (PBV) theory to explain how maintenance practices help firms achieve greater OEE. Furthermore, it introduced training practice as a moderating variable in the relationship between maintenance practices and OEE.

Details

Journal of Quality in Maintenance Engineering, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2511

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

Teresa Brannick, Séan de Búrca, Brian Fynes, Evelyn Roche and Séan Ennis

Examines the complex relationship between listening and training practices and service performance by deconstructing an earlier model of service management developed by…

2204

Abstract

Examines the complex relationship between listening and training practices and service performance by deconstructing an earlier model of service management developed by the London Business School and Warwick Business School in the UK. This research hypothesizes that the nature of the practice‐performance relationship is far too complex to be represented by a total aggregated index of practice. Hence the composite practice index is decomposed into a listening and a training index. The concept of the “listening” organisation is employed as one facet, and training climate measured by employee training activities is a second facet. These two facets are related to service performance. Reports on empirical research, which investigated the link between listening, and training practices and service performance. The data obtained from a survey of 143 service organisations in the Republic of Ireland show a clear pattern. By taking listening practices, including information technology, as a holistic view of a constellation of information‐related practice type factors, demonstrates that there is a close relationship with service performance. Extensive training activities enhance this relationship.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Emma Halliday, Lynne Friedli, Allyson McCollam and Emma Hogg

The current interest in evidence‐based practice has led to a growing literature on the role of education and training in getting evidence to inform professional practice

Abstract

The current interest in evidence‐based practice has led to a growing literature on the role of education and training in getting evidence to inform professional practice. This report outlines the findings of an evaluation of a series of evidence‐into‐practice training workshops designed to strengthen evidence‐based practice in the delivery of mental health improvement in Scotland. Evaluation was conducted in two phases, in order to assess the extent to which the training had influenced practice. The findings suggest that, in addition to providing high quality learning opportunities for mental health improvement, considerable attention needs to be given to the barriers that inhibit putting learning into practice. These barriers may need to be taken much more fully into account in the design and delivery of evidence‐into‐practice training.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2020

Irewolede Aina Ijaola, Godwin Iroroakpo Idoro and Michael Gbolagade Oladokun

The skills and knowledge of site supervisors play an important role in the outcome of construction projects. Evidence gleaned from the literature indicates that poor…

Abstract

Purpose

The skills and knowledge of site supervisors play an important role in the outcome of construction projects. Evidence gleaned from the literature indicates that poor performance of construction projects remains a central concern for stakeholders in the construction sector. This suggests that the site supervisor’s training is important in the construction project outcomes. Various training programmes are available for site supervisors, yet construction firms are not satisfied with them. The purpose of this study is to determine the key training practice indicators for optimal site supervisor’s usage in construction firms.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts a cross-sectional survey research design. In the approach, exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis were used to determine the key training practice indicators for site supervisors. Data were collected from 218 construction site supervisors using a questionnaire.

Findings

Findings show that training practices are a multidimensional concept consisting of training needs assessment, training delivery, training evaluation and transfer. From the 50 training practice variables, this study establishes 12 key training practice indicators for training site supervisors in construction firms.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should adopt a longitudinal survey for examining training practices in construction firms.

Practical implications

The identified key training indicators can inform the policies and practices used in the training of site supervisors.

Originality/value

This study contributes to knowledge by establishing 12 significant training practice indicators for optimal site supervisors’ usage in construction firms.

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