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Article

Amna Asrar Mirza and Sumaira Riaz

The training needs assessment is a significant activity for the training and development function. A human resource generalist or a specialist should be proficient in…

Abstract

Purpose

The training needs assessment is a significant activity for the training and development function. A human resource generalist or a specialist should be proficient in performing a training needs assessment. The purpose of this paper is to explain the training and development function in the Islamic banking sector and how the needs assessment of Islamic banking fits into the process, followed by an in‐depth look at the core concepts and levels involved in conducting a training needs assessment.

Design/methodology/approach

A research design is the structure for investigation and way of answering the research question. The authors have conducted this research under the umbrella of quantitative paradigm, using the cross‐sectional way of obtaining responses as it saves time and cost, and the strategy adopted for data collection was “survey questionnaire technique”. In this study, Performance Analysis. Job Analysis, Career Development and Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities were taken as independent variables and Training Needs Assessment as the dependent variable. The sample size of 100 employees was selected without any preference among the employees. Random sampling technique was used and appropriate stratification was undertaken to represent both male and female.

Findings

This study was conducted to know about training need assessment in Islamic banking in Pakistan. The authors found that the process of needs assessment identifies more than one training need; the training manager, working with management, prioritizes the training based on the urgency of the need (timeliness); the extent of the need (how many employees need to be trained); and the resources available. Also, the authors learned that training needs assessment is more crucial for performance analysis and for job analysis. Based on this information, the training manager can develop the instructional objectives for the training and development program.

Originality/value

The paper's findings will be beneficial for the training and development sector of Islamic banking. The results of the study would help training and development practitioners, showing how better planning and implementation of the training need assessment process could save their costs and time.

Details

Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, vol. 4 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4179

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Article

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This…

Abstract

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies — and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article

Louis Olivas

How often have you witnessed the design and administration of a training programme because the “manager” of a department thought training was needed? Or, the training

Abstract

How often have you witnessed the design and administration of a training programme because the “manager” of a department thought training was needed? Or, the training department offered courses because it was “traditional” and the organisation needs to train because other organisations are offering the programmes. It is my estimation that this approach to training often tends to be the rule rather than the exception.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article

Muhammad Zahid Iqbal and Rashid Ahmad Khan

This paper aims to review the relevant literature on training needs assessment (TNA) with an objective to provide users/beneficiaries of TNA with the understanding of its…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the relevant literature on training needs assessment (TNA) with an objective to provide users/beneficiaries of TNA with the understanding of its growing concept, multiple uses (outcomes), and valuing these uses (antecedents).

Design/methodology/approach

To conduct the literature review on uses of TNA, the authors used the systematic search comprising four stages: selection of appropriate search terms such as training, needs assessment, needs analysis, training needs assessment, and training needs analysis; carrying out search in established databases such as EBSCOhost, Emerald, JSTOR, SpringerLink, and Wiley‐Blackwell; initial sample filtering (relevance‐based); and further sample filtering (access‐based). Based on this review, a conceptual framework for examining the forward and backward linkages between TNA and nine human resource management and development areas is proposed for further examination.

Findings

This paper highlights training plans, goal setting, employee development, managing change, career development, knowledge, skills, and attitude, learning motivation, cost effectiveness, and performance appraisal as nine major human resource management and development areas revealing different uses of TNA. This gives an appropriate place to the expanding view of TNA.

Practical implications

This paper offers important implications for human resource professionals. Their learning about multiple uses of TNA can help them attain comprehensive solutions of varied organisational problems.

Originality/value

This paper attempts to make a significant contribution towards understanding the growing concept of TNA by expanding the long‐established way of looking at it through increasing its potential effects and subsequently enhancing its purposes and uses for both training and non‐training initiatives.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

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Article

Jacqueline Reed and Maria Vakola

This research sets out to examine how the process for developing a training needs analysis tool could influence organisational change.

Abstract

Purpose

This research sets out to examine how the process for developing a training needs analysis tool could influence organisational change.

Design/methodology/approach

The organisation that is the subject of this research is a large, complex health system which is in transition from a traditional bureaucratic, hierarchy with a command and control management style to a more participative, people centred approach. A processual, organisation development, action research‐based approach to the development of a training needs analysis process was taken in the study so that the changes desired in the organisation could be modelled in the first instance and secondly, in order to learn and understand more about what works and does not in order to continuously develop and progress the change agenda. In order to do this a parallel structure was established through which to progress the process which was tracked in an action research process. In addition, a series of interviews were conducted with top and senior management in order to ascertain their views about the process, its necessity, roles in relation to it, its potential benefits and how to introduce the process across the organisation.

Findings

A number of key points emerged from the research: first, the culture and change issues arising during the development of the learning and development needs analysis process were very significant. Second, the development and piloting of the needs analysis process needed to be approached as a change management process. Third, linking the needs analysis process with existing organisational processes was a key factor in the success of the process and created a strategic dimension. Finally, in a large, complex organisation a balance must be struck between standardisation and customisation of the needs analysis process to allow for the different structures, subcultures and levels of readiness in the organisation.

Originality/value

This research highlighted the significant impact the dynamics of hierarchy and the legacy of a bureaucratic, autocratic system has on the way a system operates and how people react to change and participation.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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Article

Phillip C. Wright and Gary D. Geroy

Reports on a study of current and past training literature whichsuggests that, to be effective and to isolate both training needs andthose problems having other…

Abstract

Reports on a study of current and past training literature which suggests that, to be effective and to isolate both training needs and those problems having other, non‐trainable solutions, training must be preceded by a needs analysis. Proposes a needs assessment model to illustrate an optimum needs assessment process, and compares this model with the Ontario Government′s “Ontario Skill” (OS) programme, a multi‐million dollar, provincially‐funded training scheme. If, as the literature suggests, needs assessment must preclude training, then it is likely that OS monies are being wasted, as under the current administrative system it is virtually impossible to conduct in‐depth assessments. Suggests ways in which needs assessment can be improved, by shifting the burden from the Government′s consultants onto specially‐trained employer representatives. It is felt that such a shift would enable sufficient time to be spent on the thousands of needs assessments conducted every year under the auspices of this massive training initiative. The methodology suggested here would be applicable to any large‐scale provincial or state‐run industrial training programme.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Article

Since the first Volume of this Bibliography there has been an explosion of literature in all the main areas of business. The researcher and librarian have to be able to…

Abstract

Since the first Volume of this Bibliography there has been an explosion of literature in all the main areas of business. The researcher and librarian have to be able to uncover specific articles devoted to certain topics. This Bibliography is designed to help. Volume III, in addition to the annotated list of articles as the two previous volumes, contains further features to help the reader. Each entry within has been indexed according to the Fifth Edition of the SCIMP/SCAMP Thesaurus and thus provides a full subject index to facilitate rapid information retrieval. Each article has its own unique number and this is used in both the subject and author index. The first Volume of the Bibliography covered seven journals published by MCB University Press. This Volume now indexes 25 journals, indicating the greater depth, coverage and expansion of the subject areas concerned.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article

Yu‐Hui Tao, C. Rosa Yeh and Sheng‐I Sun

The goal of this research is to demonstrate how web‐based applications improve the effectiveness of a very important human resource (HR) function. It proposes a framework…

Abstract

Purpose

The goal of this research is to demonstrate how web‐based applications improve the effectiveness of a very important human resource (HR) function. It proposes a framework of a web‐based training needs assessment system for HR professionals to effectively assess employee needs for competency‐based training.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual framework of a survey‐based training needs assessment using the Internet was developed. A use case detailing a walkthrough of a prototype system developed under this proposed framework was created to illustrate how this system works. A two‐phased operation test of the prototype system was then conducted to assess how well human resource (HR) managers would accept and adopt this technology to develop organizational competencies. The first phase involved demonstrating the use case to a group of experienced HR managers and polling their opinion toward the system. The second phase involved one‐on‐one interviews with three select HR managers who were asked to experience the prototype system hands‐on.

Findings

HR managers from both phases of validation demonstrated positive acceptance of both the needs assessment model and the process improvement generated from the web‐based prototype system.

Research limitations/implications

The qualitative validation test was conducted to a small sample of Taiwan's HR managers. Caution is advised when generalizing the positive results to other regions or countries with more advanced IT applications in HR practices.

Practical implications

This study contributes to the HR practice in several ways. First, it qualitatively confirms that HR professionals accept a competence‐based approach to build company's training curriculum. Second, it observes a lack of effective tools to help HR professionals in the task of training needs assessment. Third, it shows that HR professionals do recognize the power of web technology in helping them become more efficient.

Originality/value

Formal competency‐based training programs are rarely implemented in the real world because the process required is both tedious and time‐consuming. This paper adopts Internet technologies in a conceptual model for effective competency‐based training needs assessment, and presents an efficient web‐based tool to assist HR professionals in the needed analysis.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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Article

Hardik Shah and Raj Gopal

With rapid industrialization and population growth in the urban and rural areas in India, the demand for public transport has risen sharply. In the fast changing scenario…

Abstract

Purpose

With rapid industrialization and population growth in the urban and rural areas in India, the demand for public transport has risen sharply. In the fast changing scenario in the public transit sector, the role of a bus depot manager (DM) has also undergone substantial transformation. This paper aims to identify and gauge the organizational and individual training needs of DMs, necessary to design and delivery of effective training.

Design/methodology/approach

Primary data were collected by visiting three bus depots, nine in‐depth interviews with the top management team, 15 in‐depth interviews with DMs, performance data of 15 DMs and a survey of 114 DMs, using open ended questions. After primary analysis a ranking order instrument was designed and administered to 114 DMs.

Findings

The results explored current and future training requirements for the role of bus DMs based on their preference and priority. Seven differentiating competencies and ten priority training areas were identified using “priority index”. Further suggestions have been made for enhancing training effectiveness.

Practical implications

The paper provides practical insights into how to conduct training needs analysis for bus DMs using differentiating competencies and priority index. Training managers may use such tools to identify training gaps in different roles while designing effective training strategies. It provides insights into the role of bus DMs, current and future role requirements, seven differentiating competencies and training gaps in the role of a DM.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are presented based on one single role in one organization only, i.e. DMs of Gujarat State Road Transport Corporation (GSRTC). Replication studies should examine different roles across different functions.

Originality/value

This paper investigates how to identify training needs for depot managers using differentiating competencies and priority index. It provides inferences on how to align business objectives, individual performance and training needs. The tools used are ready‐to‐use and replicable for different roles in medium and large MNCs.

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