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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2021

Shahin Akther and Muhammad Sabbir Rahman

The purpose of this study is to examine the pre-training and post-training variables influencing employee training effectiveness in the banking industry in this era of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the pre-training and post-training variables influencing employee training effectiveness in the banking industry in this era of the digital age.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a cross-sectional research design and a structured questionnaire to survey the participants (i.e., bank employees) (n = 702) for data collection. The data gathered from the surveyed respondents were analyzed using the Partial Least Square to Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM) approach to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

The research findings suggest a significant influence of pre-training (i.e., training environment, trainer quality) and post-training (i.e., trainee motivation, trainee self-efficacy, and authentic leadership practices) factors towards the bank's staff training effectiveness in this era of digital age.

Originality/value

The research is one of the pioneer attempts on training effectiveness that significantly open opportunity for financial institutions such as banks to meet the challenge of the fourth industrial revolution from a developing country perspective. The current study also contributes to the extension of the theoretical and managerial doctrine in terms of the relationship among the pre-and post-training factors to enhance training effectiveness under the scope of the financial sector's employees to manage human resources and their development in the digital age.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 20 January 2021

Amitabh Deo Kodwani and Manisha Kodwani

The present study is an attempt to extend previous findings and examine the role of the trainer's reputation, training nomination and training reputation on pre-training

Abstract

Purpose

The present study is an attempt to extend previous findings and examine the role of the trainer's reputation, training nomination and training reputation on pre-training motivation and training effectiveness in a business context.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors hypothesized that trainer reputation, training nomination and training reputation would affect pre-training motivation; and that pre-training motivation would act as a mediator between these three variables and training effectiveness. The sample is constituted by 251 managerial-level employees at a large firm in India who completed pre-training and post-training surveys. These data were then analyzed using structural equation modeling and other inferential techniques.

Findings

The results suggested that self-nomination positively influences pre-training motivation. Similarly, positive training and trainer reputations also affect pre-training motivation. Pre-training motivation mediates the relationship between trainer reputation, training nomination, training reputation and training effectiveness.

Research limitations/implications

The method bias and measurement error cannot be ruled out. The data were collected from employees in a single firm via self-reports, and, ceteris paribus, it would be advantageous to broaden the sampling frame to cover multiple organizations with data collected using more than one methodology. However, the temporal lag of 45 days used herein between collecting predictor data and criterion data can reasonably be expected to have mitigated this problem to some extent.

Practical implications

The findings regarding the reputation suggest that what trainees know or what they believe they know about the trainer or the training program they are going to attend will have a significant impact on their pre-training motivation, and subsequently on the training effectiveness. It is also essential to understand how trainees get information about training. Most often, this information travels through various informal channels and passes through many people, and thus trainees may get inadequate or incorrect information about the training program and the trainer.

Originality/value

Previous research indicates that only a small proportion of training actually gets transferred to the job (Mackay, 2007). This study augments the literature by putting forward empirical evidence that could be leveraged by firms' senior management teams pursuant of optimizing investments in the training of employees.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Abdullah Al-Swidi and Mohammed Al Yahya

The purpose of this study is to further the current research on the topic of the intention to transfer training and training effectiveness by examining the gender-related…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to further the current research on the topic of the intention to transfer training and training effectiveness by examining the gender-related training intention and work behaviour differences.

Design/methodology/approach

To assess the gender-related behavioural differences, a quantitative approach using surveys from employees in Saudi universities. Using the structural equation modelling multi-group analysis approach, this study analysed the data collected from 389 individuals, comprising 186 males and 153 females. Group invariance analysis was conducted before the hypotheses were tested.

Findings

The results showed that learning style and supervisor support are critical determinants of training transfer intention and the latter is critical determinant of training effectiveness across samples of males and females. Moreover, the variance explained by the model in the male sample was found to be more than that of the female sample. Interestingly, males are found to be different than females in their perception that the training effectiveness is determined by the learning style.

Practical implications

Findings suggest that both the learning style of employees should be considered when designing a training programme and a proper support to employees should be provided by their supervisors to get the best of training investment. This may guide decision-makers to enhance training effectiveness.

Originality/value

The majority of the studies concerning training effectiveness has overlooked its antecedents and much in-depth scholarly research endeavours are still required. This study attempted to provide valuable insights of the antecedents and consequences of training transfer intention and how this structure differs between males and females in a developing country context.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 26 February 2019

Amitabh Deo Kodwani and Sanjeev Prashar

The purpose of this paper is to decipher the possibility of ensuring the effectiveness of sales training by focusing on selected organization-related variables and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to decipher the possibility of ensuring the effectiveness of sales training by focusing on selected organization-related variables and thereafter aims at making recommendations for enhancing the overall sales training effectiveness. Variables that are under organizations’ control, like training transfer climate, training evaluation and degree of choice (mandatory or by choice) were selected for this study. The study also attempted to understand how these variables influence at pre-training stage and post-training stage.

Design/methodology/approach

This cross-sectional research involved both exploratory and conclusive phases. To test the postulated hypotheses, data were collected in two phases from sales executives of a large oil and gas petrochemical company having the presence across India. A total of 370 sales executives, who were the part of a sales training program, were approached twice, one before the training and once after the eight weeks of training. Data from the respondents who completed both pre- and post-training survey (255) were used for analyses.

Findings

The results indicate that all the three predictor variables – training awareness, perceived transfer climate and the presence of an appropriate training evaluation mechanism, influence trainees’ motivation to learn. The results depict that motivation to learn mediates the association between the predictor variables and the resultant variable. Also, degree of choice was found to moderate the association between motivation to learn and sales training effectiveness. The research reinforces the significance of pre-training factors in designing sales training programs to ensure its better effectiveness.

Research limitations/implications

The present study captures organizational-level variables as they are under the control of the organization and can be managed. The study included both motivation to learn and training effectiveness in the hypothesized model to understand the motivational issues in a holistic perspective. The outcomes of this research strengthen the role of trainees’ motivation to learn as a connecting variable between organizational-level variables and sales training effectiveness. Thus, the outcome of this study contributes to the literature on training motivation as well as training effectiveness.

Practical implications

The findings of this study are significant for sales organizations or the organizations offering sales training aiming to enhance overall training effectiveness. Training managers must focus on these factors and ensure that all the pre-training organizational-level variables are very well-taken care of. This implies that the trainees need to be well informed about the training calendar, training policies, training content, expectations from them and how the program will be evaluated after training, along with appropriate positive transfer climate. Organizations should also include proper training evaluation mechanism to measure training at different levels.

Originality/value

This study is an attempt to decipher the possibility of ensuring the effectiveness of sales training by focusing on select organization-related variables, and thereafter aims at making recommendations for enhancing the overall sales training effectiveness. The study’s uniqueness lies in simultaneous examination of influence of various variables, and that too at two different points of time (before and after the training). These two perspectives are apparently missing in the existing sales training literature.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Tung‐Chun Huang

To determine whether training programs produce real benefits for small and medium‐size enterprises (SMEs), we must investigate the relationships between those programs and…

Abstract

To determine whether training programs produce real benefits for small and medium‐size enterprises (SMEs), we must investigate the relationships between those programs and their effects on the business performance of SMEs. Although a number of previous studies have attempted to accomplish this task, serious inadequacies, such as inconsistent definitions of training and “rough” methods of training classification and measurement, have raised doubts about the validity of their findings. To remedy these inadequacies and more accurately assess the relationships between training and training effectiveness, this study employs a comprehensive measurement of training including training organization, expenditure, duration, process, and delivery methods. Its findings show that firms with sophisticated training systems and strong management support for training are most successful at maximizing the effectiveness of their training programs.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 43 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2013

Azmawani Abd Rahman, Siew Imm Ng, Murali Sambasivan and Florence Wong

Training alone is not sufficient to enhance organizational effectiveness to a greater level because not all knowledge obtained from the training is properly transferred…

Abstract

Purpose

Training alone is not sufficient to enhance organizational effectiveness to a greater level because not all knowledge obtained from the training is properly transferred and applied to the organization. This study aims to investigate whether efforts invested by Malaysian manufacturers in employee training and knowledge transfer affect organizational effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a quantitative research design. The questionnaire developed for this study captured the training related to individual/managerial skills, the knowledge management process in place to capture and apply the knowledge obtained through training, and the organizational effectiveness. A closed‐ended online survey was sent to 1,000 members of the Federation of Malaysian Manufacturers (FMM) throughout Malaysia and 88 manufacturers responded. The unit of analysis was an organization.

Findings

The study found the following: training employees to acquire individual/managerial skills and process skills helps in improving organizational effectiveness; knowledge application and knowledge protection interact with individual/managerial skills training to improve organizational effectiveness; and knowledge acquisition, knowledge application and knowledge protection interact with process skills training to enhance organizational effectiveness.

Practical implications

Organizations are urged to devise training modules depending on the needs of individual employees, create an environment that will encourage the trained employees to apply their skills (knowledge), and develop policies to retain these employees.

Originality/value

This paper addresses an important and not so well researched issue. It analyzes the interactions between the dimensions of knowledge management practices and type of training in improving the organizational effectiveness of manufacturing firms in Malaysia.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1990

Garrett J. Endres and Brian H. Kleiner

Successfully measuring effectiveness in management training anddevelopment can be a difficult task. Design of a valid measurementprogramme should include evaluation in key…

Abstract

Successfully measuring effectiveness in management training and development can be a difficult task. Design of a valid measurement programme should include evaluation in key areas; including emotional reaction and knowledge gain measured after training interventions. Behavioural change and organisational impact measurements should be used on a longer time horizon to evaluate the progress and currency of the management development programme. Finally, research shows that maintaining a balance of the above measurements is the final key to success in measuring the effectiveness of management training and development.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 14 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2012

Tien‐Chen Chien

The purpose of this study is to investigate the influences of system and instructor factors on e‐learning effectiveness under the interactions of computer self‐efficacy…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the influences of system and instructor factors on e‐learning effectiveness under the interactions of computer self‐efficacy. In this study, the factors of the e‐learning system are functionality, interaction, and response. The factors of the e‐learning instructor are attitude, technical skills, and instructional method. The moderating effects of learners' computer self‐efficacy are examined.

Design/methodology/approach

The study surveyed general employees in the financial services industry in Taiwan. A questionnaire was developed to measure participants' perceptions. Four hundred questionnaires were sent out, and 362 were returned. Of these, 314 were valid, leading to a return rate of 78.5 percent.

Findings

The results of data analysis indicate that both system and instructor factors have significant positive influences on e‐learning effectiveness. Learners' computer self‐efficacy has a moderating effect on the relationship between system functionality and training effectiveness. The higher the computer self‐efficacy, the stronger is the relationship between functionality and effectiveness, and vice versa. However, computer self‐efficacy does not have a significant moderating effect on the relationship between other independent variables and training effectiveness.

Originality/value

Since both system and instructor factors have positive influences on e‐learning effectiveness, HRD managers need to pay more attention to issues in both areas. High computer self‐efficacy can result in better training effectiveness; therefore, it is necessary to pay attention to enhancing employee computer skills and their confidence in using e‐learning.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 36 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2020

Saira Saira, Sadia Mansoor, Sadia Ishaque, Sadia Ehtisham and Muhammad Ali

This study aims to investigate whether the impact of effectiveness of diversity training on affective commitment is different for men versus women and whether affective…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate whether the impact of effectiveness of diversity training on affective commitment is different for men versus women and whether affective commitment mediates the relationship between effectiveness of diversity training and employee outcomes of turnover intention and job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from 134 employees working in an Australian manufacturing organization by using an employee survey. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the data using AMOS.

Findings

The results of this study support the proposed hypotheses, demonstrating a significant, indirect effect of effective diversity training on job satisfaction and turnover intention via affective commitment. Moreover, gender moderates the relationship between effective diversity training and affective commitment.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that organizations can enhance affective commitment and job satisfaction and reduce turnover intention by providing effective diversity training to employees. Gender of employees should also be considered when evaluating the effectiveness of training.

Originality/value

This study provides pioneering evidence of the following relationships: diversity training effectiveness and turnover intention via affective commitment; diversity training effectiveness and job satisfaction via affective commitment; and diversity training effectiveness and affective commitment for men versus women.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 45 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Thomas Zwick

Employees older than 55 years of age have a much lower share in training than other employees. The purpose of this paper is to propose that one of the reasons for this…

Abstract

Purpose

Employees older than 55 years of age have a much lower share in training than other employees. The purpose of this paper is to propose that one of the reasons for this phenomenon that has not been taken into account so far is that their training is less effective.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper shows that training of older employees indeed is less effective in the self-assessment of training participants. Training effectiveness is measured with respect to key dimensions such as career development, earnings, adoption of new skills, flexibility or job security. Besides age a broad range of explanatory variables is included as covariates in a large linked employer-employee data set.

Findings

The paper finds that main reason for the differences in training effectiveness during the life cycle is that firms do not take into account differences in training motivation. Older employees get higher returns from informal and directly relevant training and from training contents that can be mainly tackled by crystallised abilities. Training incidence in the more effective training forms is, however, not higher for older employees. Given that other decisive variables on self-assessed effectiveness such as training duration, financing and initiative are not sensitive to age, the wrong allocation of training contents and training forms therefore is the critical explanation for the lower effectiveness of training.

Originality/value

This paper therefore shows to human resource managers why old employees rate training effectiveness lower and indicates what can be done in order to improve training effectiveness of old employees. It uses a large and detailed data set entailing more than 6,000 employees from about 150 establishments.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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