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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1982

RAY THOROGOOD

This overview of current themes in vocational education and training policies and systems is presented in three parts. PART 1 treats the context of vocational education and

Abstract

This overview of current themes in vocational education and training policies and systems is presented in three parts. PART 1 treats the context of vocational education and training and discusses the major issues influencing national Governments to change their role in vocational education and training. PART 2 discusses the common themes in how central Governments are changing their role in vocational education and training, particularly concerning the devolution of training responsibility to local bodies. The ways in which vocational education and training systems controlled by these local bodies are reacting to this increased responsibility are pursued in detail. PART 3 discusses the growing realization by central Governments that their responsibility for economic development and productivity can be discharged by a closer focus on vocational education and training, not at the delivery level, but at a policy level which includes both policies for vocational preparation of all citizens — particularly youth — and policies which promote new and existing enterprises which show high returns on investment and productivity.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 14 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Chien‐Yuan Chen, Kun‐Huang Yu and Mei‐Ying Chen

The aim of this project is to modify and test the executive model of professional teacher training of disaster prevention education.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this project is to modify and test the executive model of professional teacher training of disaster prevention education.

Design/methodology/approach

A three‐level teacher‐training program for disaster prevention education and training curricula is designed for campus disaster mitigation. The designed disaster prevention education in schools focus on the awareness of disasters, attitude toward prevention, preparation beforehand, appropriate countermeasures, scheduled drills, establishment of community‐based prevention units, participation, training programs for teachers, safety warning signs for public buildings, and research on disaster prevention.

Findings

The accomplishment of the project includes: the design of a systematic license procedure for disaster prevention for the leading‐level, county‐level, and campus‐level; the design of a systematic curricula for teacher training of disaster prevention and training campus‐level teachers; and the evaluation of the efficiency and performance of the teacher‐training program for disaster prevention education.

Originality/value

A three‐level teacher‐training program for disaster prevention education and training curricula is designed. Statistics analysis of training and learning efficiency evaluation by trainee shows that the designed courses are efficient and practical. The project cultured 310 campus‐level disaster prevention teachers and more than 1,000 licensed teachers trained that follow the training program in Taiwan.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1970

JT YOUNG

The appearance of a memorandum prepared by the Association of Teachers in Technical Institutions, together with the Association of Principals of Technical Institutions, on…

Abstract

The appearance of a memorandum prepared by the Association of Teachers in Technical Institutions, together with the Association of Principals of Technical Institutions, on relations between colleges and the representatives of Industry Training Boards, gives public recognition, at least by implication if not by direct statement, to difficulties which have for some time existed in the working of the 1964 Industrial Training Act. A year ago, W. M. MacQueen referred to evidence which suggested that … the Industrial Training Act is being misinterpreted to the detriment of our technical education service and consequently of our industry, and more recently, EDUCATION, the official journal of the Association of Education Committees, commented that Resentment against the training officers attached to industry training boards has been steadily hotting up in colleges of further education. Some of them, the technical teachers say privately, are butting in like self‐styled HMIs, and presuming too far to tell the teachers their business. And some local authorities, the teachers allege, instead of defending the teachers, have been turning a blind eye to the interference because of the undeniable financial benefits which accrue to the education service from investment by industry.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 2 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1976

Tom Young

The adoption of a new structure for manpower planning and training (following the Employment and Training Act of 1973) has brought again into prominence national attitudes…

Abstract

The adoption of a new structure for manpower planning and training (following the Employment and Training Act of 1973) has brought again into prominence national attitudes towards training and its relation to education. In particular, the setting‐up of a substantially autonomous Manpower Services Commission, having responsibility for a training Services Agency with wide powers as one of its two executive arms (the other dealing with Employment), introduces into this country a pattern of training differing in a fundamental way from those which have preceded it. What industrial training is believed to be, therefore, and how it relates to the further education which is often associated with it, are questions which have now assumed a new importance.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Ramzi Nasser and Kamal Abouchedid

The study examines the level of satisfaction amongst Lebanese university graduates on their training/education in light of their current occupational level.

Abstract

Purpose

The study examines the level of satisfaction amongst Lebanese university graduates on their training/education in light of their current occupational level.

Design/methodology/approach

Focus groups were interviewed to understand factors that helped graduates in their occupation. These factors were turned into a Likert‐scale questionnaire in which a large sample (n=604) of university graduates from public and private universities in Lebanon were asked to report the utility of their university education and training required for their current job.

Findings

Findings showed that graduates from private universities documented greater satisfaction in their education and training, especially in the fields of engineering, medicine, and information science, than did graduates from the public sector of higher education. Graduates in the low occupational status category perceived university education as important in the performance of their occupation.

Research limitations/implications

The study was intended to find if graduates' were satisfied with their university education. Satisfaction in that sense is used as a proxy for quality. The need to refine the concept of quality in higher education is recommended in any future study to provide a possible measure of value to higher educational training.

Practical implications

Importantly, public higher education in Lebanon need to compete aggressively with private institutions to provide key “soft skills” needed at the work place.

Originality/value

The paper offers some empirical data in an under‐researched field.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

John Millington

Within the context of the decline in the numbers of young peopleentering engineering training in recent years, with the many and complexcauses ranging from demographic…

Abstract

Within the context of the decline in the numbers of young people entering engineering training in recent years, with the many and complex causes ranging from demographic realities to social attitudes, reviews some of the policy (and other) changes which have influenced engineering (and other) training during the period of decline. The hope that better times are now possible, although by default rather than by design, emerges. Statistics are avoided but the context is indicated by the numbers of those at the earliest certificated stage of training in engineering over recent years.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Sherry Jespersen

When I began to consider this topic I was struck by the number of times I wrote the word ‘change’ in my preliminary notes, and change is really the theme or leitmotiv…

Abstract

When I began to consider this topic I was struck by the number of times I wrote the word ‘change’ in my preliminary notes, and change is really the theme or leitmotiv which runs throughout this paper. I shall look first at a number of issues which are changing the use of information and the nature of information work Those changes have implications for the future information workforce and for the education and training of that workforce. Next, I shall briefly describe the way in which the main providers of information education and training are themselves changing to meet the new demands. Specifically, I shall discuss developments within library and information schools, the provision of continuing education against the ever present backcloth of reduced budgets and inadequate funds, and finally I shall touch on the development of the New National Vocational Qualifications in library and information work.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1994

Chris Velde, Tom Cooper and Rod Gerber

Reports on the results of a survey with training officers addressingeducation training needs of Australia’s Adult and Community Educationsector. The responses show that…

Abstract

Reports on the results of a survey with training officers addressing education training needs of Australia’s Adult and Community Education sector. The responses show that training officers believe that this sector is rapidly growing, is important to the economic wellbeing of Australia and will benefit from course provision at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Discusses issues of course content and delivery, stressing the need for maximum flexibility in modes of study, etc.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

Kazuo Hiramatu

In Japanese corporations, the backgrounds of corporate accountants do not necessarily match their university majors. Under the lifetime employment system, accountants are…

Abstract

In Japanese corporations, the backgrounds of corporate accountants do not necessarily match their university majors. Under the lifetime employment system, accountants are rotated to other departments every five to ten years. Those who are rotated to the accounting department do not necessarily arrive with sufficient accounting knowledge. In addition to receiving on‐the‐job training, corporate accountants generally attend training courses offered by outside Institutions and get new knowledge to be used in practice. Some corporations belong to specific study groups, which meet periodically. The latter groups provide opportunities for establishing informal human relations with government officials and accountants of other corporations. Training is offered to newcomers, candidates for promotion, salespersons and management staff in the fields of financial analysis, cost management and accounting in general. Sometimes, the training lasts for several days in a training facility of the corporation. It is thought useful not only for utilizing the knowledge required, but for furthering relationships within the organization, as well as for the evaluation of employees through their attitudes about participation. It reflects the policy of long‐range performance evaluation. Employees are evaluated not only by sales volume, but also by their loyalty to the corporation and their contribution to the team effort.

Details

Asian Review of Accounting, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1321-7348

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Book part
Publication date: 11 July 2019

Tanya Fitzgerald and Sally Knipe

Teacher colleges played a significant role in the preparation of teachers for over 100 years in New Zealand. Teacher training colleges opened in the 1880s and served as…

Abstract

Teacher colleges played a significant role in the preparation of teachers for over 100 years in New Zealand. Teacher training colleges opened in the 1880s and served as the main institutions for teacher preparation. Toward the end of the twentieth century, the plight of teachers’ colleges once again fell victim to the ‘decline and demand cycle’ for teachers. Fueled by discussions regarding the extent teacher training should be “practically based in the classroom”, new government directions and policy priorities for the preparation of the teaching workforce were implemented. All teacher colleges experienced either staged amalgamations or ultimate closure. In the late 1970s and 1980s, the preparation of teachers entered a new phase as the responsibility shifted to the university sector, which included the training of kindergarten teachers. While the policy rhetoric imagined this to be an amalgamation, the reality was a process fraught with a number of anxieties, not the least of which were the intellectual shifts.

Details

Historical Perspectives on Teacher Preparation in Aotearoa New Zealand
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-640-0

Keywords

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